Microsoft plans to release another mobile OS

Windows Embedded Handheld

Just to recap, Microsoft already has Windows Mobile 6.5 on the market, Windows Phone 7 nearing launch, and Windows Embedded Compact 7 coming to tablets. Is there anything left in the mobile spectrum for Microsoft to sink their teeth into? Apparently, yes.

According to PCMag, Microsoft is set to launch, yet another mobile operating system by the name of Windows Embedded Handheld. What could this OS possibly be? Aren't there enough versions of mobile Windows in the pipes? According to Ballmer, this is what we can expect:

"In the next six months we will release a new embedded OS called Windows Embedded Handheld, based on Windows Mobile 6.5 technologies ... [and] in the second half of 2011, we will release a version of Windows Embedded Handheld based on Windows Phone 7 technology."

At Microsoft MIX, the Redmond based company made it very clear that Windows Phone 7 was an OS focused on both personal and enterprise use. With SharePoint integration and better Exchange support, it would seem that Microsoft was betting heavily on Windows Phone 7 in the corporate world. However, the news of another embedded OS comes as sort of a shock.

Announced alongside Motorola's ES400 device , Windows Embedded Handheld will be used on EDA (enterprise digital assistant) devices. EDAs are special phones that support line-of-business applications, push-to-scan capabilities, and other heavy enterprise-only features. It doesn't look like Microsoft is aiming for a brand new phone OS with Windows Embedded Handheld. This OS variation seems more like a business deal that will keep Microsoft strongly grounded in companies for years to come.

Image credit: ZDNet

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Just IMO, but many of you don't seem to get it.

This is Microsoft adding options. They're not trying to fragment their market, they're aiming at separate markets here. The key word in the image in this post is "enterprise" -- this is for businesses, not the standard consumer. Obviously we don't know a lot about what will separate this from Windows Phone 7, but Microsoft is aiming it at a different market or they'd simply use Windows Phone 7 (heck, it even says that's what it's based on, so obviously they're changing it for some reason).

This is just offering different versions to different markets. You're not going to use the same technology for a cell phone that you are in, say, a touch-screen medical station (just an example).

Ayepecks said,
Just IMO, but many of you don't seem to get it.

This is Microsoft adding options. They're not trying to fragment their market, they're aiming at separate markets here. The key word in the image in this post is "enterprise" -- this is for businesses, not the standard consumer. Obviously we don't know a lot about what will separate this from Windows Phone 7, but Microsoft is aiming it at a different market or they'd simply use Windows Phone 7 (heck, it even says that's what it's based on, so obviously they're changing it for some reason).

This is just offering different versions to different markets. You're not going to use the same technology for a cell phone that you are in, say, a touch-screen medical station (just an example).

Yeah, well, why not? Look, all that the OS is SUPPOSE to be doing is facilitating a user interface, running software, and driving hardware. An OS can be made so it is well suited for a number of tasks. The corner stone of all these Microsoft Mobile OSes is that they drive touch screen devices. MS is over-complicating the situation for licensing reasons, not for application reasons. Everyone who is siding w/ MS even keep saying "it's all based on the same core". Well, yeah, if it is all the same why not just call it all the same?

Same thing with Windows, really. IMO there does not need to be a Starter Edition, Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7. Apple makes 1 OS, it is called Mac OS X and it targets business and personal market spaces. That must really blow MS fanboy's mind.

Shadrack said,

Yeah, well, why not? Look, all that the OS is SUPPOSE to be doing is facilitating a user interface, running software, and driving hardware. An OS can be made so it is well suited for a number of tasks. The corner stone of all these Microsoft Mobile OSes is that they drive touch screen devices. MS is over-complicating the situation for licensing reasons, not for application reasons. Everyone who is siding w/ MS even keep saying "it's all based on the same core". Well, yeah, if it is all the same why not just call it all the same?

Same thing with Windows, really. IMO there does not need to be a Starter Edition, Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7. Apple makes 1 OS, it is called Mac OS X and it targets business and personal market spaces. That must really blow MS fanboy's mind.


Because enterprise needs and consumer needs are vastly different and require different solutions to meet them?

Shadrack said,

Yeah, well, why not? Look, all that the OS is SUPPOSE to be doing is facilitating a user interface, running software, and driving hardware. An OS can be made so it is well suited for a number of tasks. The corner stone of all these Microsoft Mobile OSes is that they drive touch screen devices. MS is over-complicating the situation for licensing reasons, not for application reasons. Everyone who is siding w/ MS even keep saying "it's all based on the same core". Well, yeah, if it is all the same why not just call it all the same?

Same thing with Windows, really. IMO there does not need to be a Starter Edition, Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7. Apple makes 1 OS, it is called Mac OS X and it targets business and personal market spaces. That must really blow MS fanboy's mind.


Why would you call it the same and confuse your market? Why would you imply that what works for one will work for all? Why would you neuter one version to make it appropriate for all? Being based on the same core does not make them the same! Apple's mobile iOS may be BASED off of OS X, but is NOT OS X. Did that just blow your little Mac fanboy mind?


Get off your freaking high horse. I own Mac products, use Mac OS X where I work and love it as well as Mac products. Apple makes one OS core (two OSes, iOS and OS X), and that OS core is not used by anywhere near as many people and for as many tasks as Microsoft's. When you see OS X powering a touch-based solution in an emergency room, you let me know.

Shadrack said,

Yeah, well, why not? Look, all that the OS is SUPPOSE to be doing is facilitating a user interface, running software, and driving hardware. An OS can be made so it is well suited for a number of tasks. The corner stone of all these Microsoft Mobile OSes is that they drive touch screen devices. MS is over-complicating the situation for licensing reasons, not for application reasons. Everyone who is siding w/ MS even keep saying "it's all based on the same core". Well, yeah, if it is all the same why not just call it all the same?

Same thing with Windows, really. IMO there does not need to be a Starter Edition, Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7. Apple makes 1 OS, it is called Mac OS X and it targets business and personal market spaces. That must really blow MS fanboy's mind.

Really don't see the need for a consumer based phone to have realtime scheduling. Android or iOS don't have that and probably never will nor do they need it because they are "PHONES NOT ANYTHING ELSE BUT PHONES AND THATS WHY THEY DON'T NEED ALL OF THE OTHER THINGS THAT MAKE REAL DEVICES THAT DON'T FIT IN YOUR LITTLE WORLD WORK". And that's why microsoft has 89% market share on sales of industrial devices last year and apple/android made up and continue to make about 0%.

Personally I think they should have just stuck with Windows 7 on their tablets and just made some modifications to the shell. That was the one thing the Slate used to have over iPad, functionality.

The biggest problem that I see with this is that they are releasing so many mobile and embedded OSs with similar names, but different functionality, that it might even confuse OEMs about which one they should use for which products.

roadwarrior said,
The biggest problem that I see with this is that they are releasing so many mobile and embedded OSs with similar names, but different functionality, that it might even confuse OEMs about which one they should use for which products.

Not really.

Consumer Phones = WP7
Enterprise handhelds = Embeded Handhelds
Everything else = Compact Embeded

and they are all based on the same core. For the people complaining about zune, it uses an older version of CE and the KIN phones use a stripped down version of WP7.

For developers for any of the above they are moving everyone towards Silverlight.

That would be nice if everything could be lumped in nice little categories like that, but there are likely plenty of things that cross over between different categories. The same kind of problem happens with Windows. Certain SKUs have some features, other SKUs have other features. If you want features of both, you have not choice but to go with Ultimate. The same kinds of problems are bound to crop up for some OEMs when trying to decide which version to put on their devices.

Respawn said,
I am looking forward to the release of this new OS from microsoft, I think they are moving in the direction.

I don't think they are moving in "the direction" (I'm assuming you meant to say "the right direction", which would imply one direction), but many different directions at once.

release over 9000 different embedded/tablet/mobile OS's = profit ... ?

seriously just make ONE good one Microsoft that isn't a specific niche orientation and one that can be adapted across many uses and you'll be sorted.

Another phone OS? Really? Why don't they just do one killer mobile phone OS? Just one and make it perfect, concentrate on one thing. I think this is a problem with MS, too many fingers in too many pies.

this just has fail all over it. "If we cant beat em well saturate the market with mediocre mobile OS'" How about you work on making WP7 a success then go hatch all these lil spin-off's

Osiris said,
this just has fail all over it. "If we cant beat em well saturate the market with mediocre mobile OS'" How about you work on making WP7 a success then go hatch all these lil spin-off's

You haven't grasped what this is. It is NOT software for consumer phones. You will not be able to walk into a store and buy a phone running this software. These are for devices like barcode scanners, stuff the industry uses.

The graphic says that WH7 is going to be based on WEC7, but the article states that it will be based on WP7. I think that's an important distinction and that MS may be looking to replace WEC with this Windows handheld platform and kind of merge WP7 and WEC7 into one OS for iPad-like or tablet devices. It sounds like a good idea, especially if they phased out the WEC platform after this is released.

There's a reason Apple uses the same OS on all its mobile devices. Shame Microsoft will never seem to understand that. Even HP knows the benefits of a uniting devices with a single OS.

Xero said,
There's a reason Apple uses the same OS on all its mobile devices. Shame Microsoft will never seem to understand that. Even HP knows the benefits of a uniting devices with a single OS.

It IS one single OS - Windows Compact 7. Just different tools and features to go with it to package it differently for different platforms. You wouldn't want the tools that make up your mobile phone in your car, would you? Nor would car-specific toolsets make sense in your handheld inventory tracker. Using these variants instead of the base CE7 OS means you will have to do a lot less work molding the platform for your needs.

When platform-specific flavors aren't available - such as in a DSLR, STB, MID Theatre Projectors etc etc - you can take the base CE7 OS and customize it for your needs.

as long as windows, people are bored of it. microsoft should invent something that is not windows. wtf can you intrigue people with that granddaddy windows!

warr said,
as long as windows, people are bored of it. microsoft should invent something that is not windows. wtf can you intrigue people with that granddaddy windows!

Show some respect young-un! your mommy and daddy probably started out cybering using Procomm Plus and surfing multi-line BBS's all behind Win 3.1.

Why is everyone assuming this is a mobile phone OS? Upto WM6.5, the OS could be used for devices like handheld bill-printers or inventory tracker, specialized GPS-devices, and stuff - handheld devices which are not mobile phones. With WP7, the platform is too phone-focussed to be used on such devices. This platform is a specialized CE7-based platform for the same.

This has absolutely nothing to do with regular end-users. If you walk into a Sprint store in 2012, you will see Windows Phone 7 devices, not all sorts of phones running different Microsoft operating systems. This isn't targeted at any of us. One operating system matters, just one, Windows Phone 7. Kin will merge will Windows Phone 7 in time, maybe in Windows Phone 7's second release. Nothing else matters, especially the fact that you can't really develop for Kin, only Windows Phone 7. Even if Kin doesn't merge, it's a stupid kid's phone, only the concept matters.

Electric Jolt said,
This has absolutely nothing to do with regular end-users. If you walk into a Sprint store in 2012, you will see Windows Phone 7 devices, not all sorts of phones running different Microsoft operating systems. This isn't targeted at any of us. One operating system matters, just one, Windows Phone 7. Kin will merge will Windows Phone 7 in time, maybe in Windows Phone 7's second release. Nothing else matters, especially the fact that you can't really develop for Kin, only Windows Phone 7. Even if Kin doesn't merge, it's a stupid kid's phone, only the concept matters.

The way I read it was: If you don't like our restrictions we put on Windows Phone 7, you can use Windows Embedded Handheld 7 and make whatever Phone you want. MS is responding to the outcry on the limitations Win Pho 7 has, which kind of makes sense. For instance National Instruments has a module for their LabVIEW development software that lets you compile applications for Windows Mobile 6.5 for use out in the field.

But what is stopping HTC from going with Win EH 7 for a device and putting it into a Sprint store? If MS limits them so that they cannot do that, then doesn't that defeat the purpose of what Win EH is suppose to be about (no limitations on what manufacturers do with it)?

Shadrack said,

The way I read it was: If you don't like our restrictions we put on Windows Phone 7, you can use Windows Embedded Handheld 7 and make whatever Phone you want. MS is responding to the outcry on the limitations Win Pho 7 has, which kind of makes sense. For instance National Instruments has a module for their LabVIEW development software that lets you compile applications for Windows Mobile 6.5 for use out in the field.

But what is stopping HTC from going with Win EH 7 for a device and putting it into a Sprint store? If MS limits them so that they cannot do that, then doesn't that defeat the purpose of what Win EH is suppose to be about (no limitations on what manufacturers do with it)?

It was never about limitations, it was about different lines of business for different use. To a developer in the enterprise sector this move has been known for some time and the only thing new is the name. It's not a response, but an increment in the original plan that was designed from day one of the new mobile strategy. Originally it was called WP7 for business use or something like that and was only 10% complete when WP7 consumer use was at 80%.

Enterprise development is a multi-billion dollar market and microsoft owns probably 85% of the OS marketshare in that space. Even companies that appear to have ditched windows mobile like motorola and hp still invest heavily into microsoft's enterprise OS line. It just so happens to be windows mobile 6.1, 6.5, and soon to be embedded handheld.

The best thing about it all is that the code bases are still getting better and the development environments are mostly the same across the platforms. So, if you can develop for one aspect of windows, you can almost develop for them all and your job outlook is very nice. Many of the other platforms like Iphone OS, mac, linux, android, and chrome OS have their good points, but the development fragmentation is a lot higher.

Shadrack said,

The way I read it was: If you don't like our restrictions we put on Windows Phone 7, you can use Windows Embedded Handheld 7 and make whatever Phone you want. MS is responding to the outcry on the limitations Win Pho 7 has, which kind of makes sense. For instance National Instruments has a module for their LabVIEW development software that lets you compile applications for Windows Mobile 6.5 for use out in the field.

But what is stopping HTC from going with Win EH 7 for a device and putting it into a Sprint store? If MS limits them so that they cannot do that, then doesn't that defeat the purpose of what Win EH is suppose to be about (no limitations on what manufacturers do with it)?

What stops Dell or HP to sell PCs with Windows Server 2008 to their customers?

Oh wait-

MS needs Zune OS, KIN, WinMo 6.5, Win Ph 7, Win CE 6.5, and Win CE 7 all to compete against Google Android. I'm betting on MS because they seem to REALLY know what they are doing in the mobile market!

Don't forget the KIN and Zune mobile OSes as well - although some of them may merge eventually that's still a lot of different products...

Northgrove said,
Just watch out for fragmenting your developers too much, Microsoft!

Signed, a developer

I don't think so, these are still based off of the same code, CE, one with the WinMo 6.5 bits and a later one with the WP7 bits (which are neweer). The key here is that a OEM can take these Embedded OS's and do whatever they want with them, for specific devices more than any wide range consumer device.

Northgrove said,
Just watch out for fragmenting your developers too much, Microsoft!

Signed, a developer

Actually, they are defragmenting the mobile platform. Notice they are moving away from Windows Embedded Classic? And what will prevail is Windows Phone 7 OS.

Northgrove said,
Just watch out for fragmenting your developers too much, Microsoft!

Signed, a developer

If you're developing a fart app, you're going to release it on ONE platform, WP7. You're never even going to know about Windows Embedded Handheld, since it's for industires to use, like for manufacturing inventory. They don't need "apps" in that market.

Think harder.

Northgrove said,
Just watch out for fragmenting your developers too much, Microsoft!

Signed, a developer

I'm not sure that's going to be an issue. I mean, if it's all based on WP7, then Silverlight apps developed for WP7 should run on these other versions of the OS as well... Unless Microsoft has good reason to disallow this (As it would really require work for them to do this as far as I can gather). Plus, they said that they plan on releasing updates for their Kin platform which will allow apps to be installed similar to WP7, so it seems like they're trying to make things simpler...

GP007 said,

I don't think so, these are still based off of the same code, CE, one with the WinMo 6.5 bits and a later one with the WP7 bits (which are neweer). The key here is that a OEM can take these Embedded OS's and do whatever they want with them, for specific devices more than any wide range consumer device.


Yes, but will the API's remain the same? Can a developer assume devices from different manufacturers support a common set of functionality? If a developer have to start using two different API's, Microsoft have lost.

That an OEM can take those OS and do whatever they want with them sound more like a disadvantage than anything else, to me as a developer and not an OEM.

The Windows Embedded brand is targeted towards constructors that want an OS but don't have a phone that satisfies WinPho7 requirements. It means that Microsoft won't have a control over what the constructor wants to put on top of the OS, you can see that there is a demand for that from constructors that don't want anything to do with the WinPho brand but still want a good OS with support.

WinMo6.5 is here for people that rely heavily on "legacy" applications in their business environment and still want to have an "fresh" phone, they'll certainly discontinue the 6.5 brand when WinPho7 has grabbed enough market.

Finally WinPho7 is the main consumer-oriented OS that's marketed under the Microsoft brand, with strict requirements.

I don't think it's confusing if you think about it. As an end-user you'll only care about WinPho7, or WinMo6.5 if you rely on legacy businness applications. As a constructor you'll be more interested by WE if you want complete freedom over what to do with the OS.

Drunken Beard said,

I don't think it's confusing if you think about it. As an end-user you'll only care about WinPho7, or WinMo6.5 if you rely on legacy businness applications. As a constructor you'll be more interested by WE if you want complete freedom over what to do with the OS.

Not only are you only going to care about one or the other, most people are only ever going to SEE one or the other. If you're a consumer going into a Verizon store to buy a phone, you'll only see the WP7 stuff. Not the Handheld stuff.

I was wondering what enterprise devices would get when WM7 took over.... almost every major store uses one for inventory with their barcode scanners and wifi / cell connections.... but all their apps run in a Win CE type UI... wonder what will change UI wise

neufuse said,
I was wondering what enterprise devices would get when WM7 took over.... almost every major store uses one for inventory with their barcode scanners and wifi / cell connections.... but all their apps run in a Win CE type UI... wonder what will change UI wise

Yeah, I was wondering that as well. I'm still a bit curious what this will be aside from stripping social networking from the OS and other non essential things like music and games... I guess the apps will still be Silverlight based?

Byron_Hinson said,
and they moaned that no one understood why Google did android and Chrome OS's?

Android & Chrome OS are completely based on different technologies..For the above Windows Mobile OS, all are still based on the CE version...WP7 is more for consumer..and for business still they wanted there customized release (for RF devices, embedded machines etc)

guruparan said,

Android & Chrome OS are completely based on different technologies..For the above Windows Mobile OS, all are still based on the CE version...WP7 is more for consumer..and for business still they wanted there customized release (for RF devices, embedded machines etc)
You mean those radically different technologies of "Linux" and... errr... "Linux"?

Byron_Hinson said,
and they moaned that no one understood why Google did android and Chrome OS's?

Completely different. This isn't for consumer phones.

Conjor said,
Sounds... Interesting? What will this OS do that Mobile 7 wont? Or any other mobile OS?

It lets device makers do whatever they want with the OS, unlike WP7 which is controlled by MS from top to bottom.

Why do you have to be a pushover and explain it! This isn't Twitter, if you are going to comment you need to RTFA and not post after reading the title!

It says everything you need to know in the article and if Conjor doesn't want to read it then he misses out, plain and simple.

I'm already irritated the Like This feature was moved right next to the title of news article as if you are supposed to use it right after reading the title.

Electric Jolt said,
Why do you have to be a pushover and explain it! This isn't Twitter, if you are going to comment you need to RTFA and not post after reading the title!

It says everything you need to know in the article and if Conjor doesn't want to read it then he misses out, plain and simple.

I'm already irritated the Like This feature was moved right next to the title of news article as if you are supposed to use it right after reading the title.

How about YOU read the article and tell me where it specifies the actual FEATURES that will be different. All I see a vague reference to "line-of-business applications, push-to-scan capabilities, and other heavy enterprise-only features"

Conjor said,

How about YOU read the article and tell me where it specifies the actual FEATURES that will be different. All I see a vague reference to "line-of-business applications, push-to-scan capabilities, and other heavy enterprise-only features"

Here's the difference:

CONSUMER: "I want to buy a phone so I can call my family, text my friends, view my Facebook newsfeed, find resturants on Bing Maps, stream Slacker Radio, and play some games on Xbox Live"

INDUSTRY USER: "I need to take inventory on this 1,000 item shipment, and then view the schedule for our next week's shipment, and tap into our database to see which products we need to order"

Why would Microsoft give an industry that takes inventory or other specific tasks a consumer orientated operating system like Windows Phone 7? That's why they created Windows Embedded Handheld, so that industries could create their own software for their specific tasks. They don't need Facebook or Xbox Live.

warwagon said,
When they release mobile OS's they don't dick around.

Some might say releasing 4 mobile OS's is dicking around Have to wait and see the quality.

Minimoose said,

Some might say releasing 4 mobile OS's is dicking around Have to wait and see the quality.

The thing is, only 2 of those are aimed at consumer phones (Kin and WP7).

Windows Embedded Compact 7 is for tablets, which tablets SHOULD have a different operating system than phones, anyways.

This new, Windows Embedded Handheld is for corporations and industries, not for consumer use, which also makes sense to create a seperate OS for them. Do they need Facebook contacts syncing to their handheld while playing Xbox Live? NO. Those handhelds are used for monitoring inventory/etc.

andrewbares said,

Windows Embedded Compact 7 is for tablets, which tablets SHOULD have a different operating system than phones, anyways.
I honestly don't see why you cant use a mobile OS as a tablet OS

andrewbares said,

The thing is, only 2 of those are aimed at consumer phones (Kin and WP7).

Windows Embedded Compact 7 is for tablets, which tablets SHOULD have a different operating system than phones, anyways.

This new, Windows Embedded Handheld is for corporations and industries, not for consumer use, which also makes sense to create a seperate OS for them. Do they need Facebook contacts syncing to their handheld while playing Xbox Live? NO. Those handhelds are used for monitoring inventory/etc.

Ahhh yes I figured this might be for a tablet.

@Smigit: If you worked in an environment where mobility of a computer was necessary and a laptop was to clunky, you would see the reason for a tablet with a powerful OS.

Conjor said,
@Smigit: If you worked in an environment where mobility of a computer was necessary and a laptop was to clunky, you would see the reason for a tablet with a powerful OS.
It depends who you are marketing to. The way he worded it with the emphasis on SHOULD it made it seem to me that he is implying that is always the case. I think its case specific and a mobile OS can be fantastic for a tablet, depending what you want to do with it.


For multimedia and home use something like the iOS for instance isnt bad. I wouldn't give someone an iPad to do CAD work but (hell I wouldn't use one for document authoring). So yes, theres a place for a full blown OS but you certainly don't HAVE to have one if the task doesn't ask for it.

Smigit said,
It depends who you are marketing to. The way he worded it with the emphasis on SHOULD it made it seem to me that he is implying that is always the case. I think its case specific and a mobile OS can be fantastic for a tablet, depending what you want to do with it.


For multimedia and home use something like the iOS for instance isnt bad. I wouldn't give someone an iPad to do CAD work but (hell I wouldn't use one for document authoring). So yes, theres a place for a full blown OS but you certainly don't HAVE to have one if the task doesn't ask for it.

The problem with expanding a mobile OS onto a larger tablet screen is that usually, they're just going to expand the interface, similar to what they did with the iPad. The only mobile OS I see becoming actually functional for a tablet is the Android OS, since (1) the homescreen can contain widgets AND applications, (2) there's a notification manager at the top, (3) there's true multitasking, and when you're using a device that size, it should actually multitask.

The iPhone OS and WP7 are great for less than 4.3" screens, but larger than that, it's time to get something customized for a bigger experience. Android has the scalability to expand to any of those screen sizes. I'm buying a WP7 though!

andrewbares said,

The problem with expanding a mobile OS onto a larger tablet screen is that usually, they're just going to expand the interface, similar to what they did with the iPad...

It wouldn't make sense for them to just expand the Win7 Phone interface when they already have other interfaces such as the Cosmopolitan (Zune Desktop Software) interface.

andrewbares said,

The problem with expanding a mobile OS onto a larger tablet screen is that usually, they're just going to expand the interface, similar to what they did with the iPad. The only mobile OS I see becoming actually functional for a tablet is the Android OS, since (1) the homescreen can contain widgets AND applications, (2) there's a notification manager at the top, (3) there's true multitasking, and when you're using a device that size, it should actually multitask.
Is that a problem with it being a mobile OS but or just iOS in general? Widgets or some notifications on the home screen has been something people have wanted for a very long time, as is a better way to handle notifications. Multitasking...yeah well maybe, but the other issues are more design issues with iOS that do carry back to the mobile phone too and could easily be addressed in a future update.


I'm going to guess the multitasking implementation for iOS will be fine too for the market the iPad is aimed at in most cases (not all). We'll see on that I guess but when the time comes and what issues developers have around it.

warwagon said,
When they release mobile OS's they don't dick around.
This is a very bad move my MS, unless both OSes are based off Silverlight and the apps work on both the OSes. Otherwise, this is going to cost them dearly in the long run. Managing multiple OSes and their apps isn't an easy task, especially at a time when smart phone OSes are gaining ground over desktop OSes.

Jebadiah said,
This is a very bad move my MS, unless both OSes are based off Silverlight and the apps work on both the OSes. Otherwise, this is going to cost them dearly in the long run. Managing multiple OSes and their apps isn't an easy task, especially at a time when smart phone OSes are gaining ground over desktop OSes.

This isn't for consumer phones. This is for specific industry handheld devices. Think of those inventory scanners you see at box stores.