Microsoft posts confusing, but official, Surface Pro storage numbers

Now that the Surface Pro is officially on sale (although the 128 GB version seems to be in short supply online) Microsoft has now updated the Surface website with its official storage numbers for the 64 and 128 GB versions of the Windows 8 Pro tablet.

The numbers shown on the Surface website are a tad confusing, however. That's because, as ZDNet's Ed Bott points out, the page uses the binary system to display how much space is available on the tablets. If you go by the page, the 64 GB version has just 59 GB of total space, with a total among of available space listed as just 29 GB if you take away the Windows 8 Pro and included apps and the system recovery tools.

The 128 GB version has just 119 GB of storage, according to the binary system, with 89 GB of space available after the Windows 8 Pro and included apps and the system recovery tools are taken into account.

If you use the decimal system to measure storage space, things look a lot better. Then the 64 GB version has 32 GB of available storage, and the 128 GB version has 96 GB of file space. Owners can free up another 10 GB of space if they move their system recovery tools over to an external flash drive.

Source: Surface website

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

128 GB Surface Pro already sold out on US Microsoft Store site

Next Story

Microsoft working to 'replenish supplies' of 128 GB Surface Pro

29 Comments

View more comments

open surface, pop out ssd, ebay it. pop in new 256GB or 480GB msata ssd. close up, reinstall OS of choise, insert porn.

linsook said,
open surface, pop out ssd, ebay it. pop in new 256GB or 480GB msata ssd. close up, reinstall OS of choise, insert porn.

actually you cant pop up the ssd, at least on surface rt, because the flash is soldered on the board. you can desolder the chips though if you're good with working with solder.

ShareShiz said,
Either way, both seem to have enough storage space.

Unless one can not go a few hours with GB's worth of porn at their fingertips.

1TB WD passport drive is ~$100.

you can just use micro sdxc cards. class 10 kingstons 64GB are only 15 bucks on ebay.

linsook said,
open surface, pop out ssd, ebay it. pop in new 256GB or 480GB msata ssd. close up, reinstall OS of choise, insert porn.

The SSD may not be a standard form factor. Tablets are so dense that layout is a very tricky task.

Samsung supplied a small-form-factor SSD for the MacBook Pro. They could easily supply the same thing to Microsoft.

peacemf said,
yes but the hastle of having an external HDD to carry porn!, thats also the one HDD you wife/gf/family/friends/other people cannot EVER find.........

This is why you use NTFS and why you right click on it, and select 'Encrypt' - then only your account can ever read it.

vcfan said,

actually you cant pop up the ssd, at least on surface rt, because the flash is soldered on the board. you can desolder the chips though if you're good with working with solder.

TomJones said,

The SSD may not be a standard form factor. Tablets are so dense that layout is a very tricky task.

Samsung supplied a small-form-factor SSD for the MacBook Pro. They could easily supply the same thing to Microsoft.

thenetavenger said,

The SSD in the Surface Pro isn't as replaceable as people assume, as they are very high end performing drives.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001...ws-off-its-inner-ultrabook/

Says right there it's a 'full blown ssd' namely the micron c400 msata which you can buy off the shelf, so I'd bet that yes, you can replace it.

shinji257 said,
But then opening it would likely void said warranty.

Ya, that's true, but that hasn't stopped anybody before with their laptops.

True but in most cases upgrading your hard drive and ram on a laptop is considered user upgradable and user serviceable. I doubt that's the case with a tablet.

peacemf said,
yes but the hastle of having an external HDD to carry porn!, thats also the one HDD you wife/gf/family/friends/other people cannot EVER find.........

This is so sad. If a couple can't porn together, they shouldn't BE together.

Not sure how that is "confusing" as it posts exactly how much the file system starts with and what uses it, then what is left. Pretty simple if you ask me.

how is this confusing? have you never seen the amount of available free space after you format a memory card or drive?

drive manufacturers count 1kb as 1000 bytes, whereas OSes like windows count 1kb as 1024 bytes

a 64GB drive has 64 000 000 000 bytes total according to the manufacturer

Hard drive
1kb = 1000 bytes: 1000*1000*1000*64 = 64 000 000 000 bytes = 64GB

Windows
1kb = 1024 bytes: 64 000 000 000 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 = 59.6GB

plus formatting and filesystem have overhead,so the amount reported can be lower.

vcfan said,
how is this confusing? have you never seen the amount of available free space after you format a memory card or drive?

drive manufacturers count 1kb as 1000 bytes, whereas OSes like windows count 1kb as 1024 bytes

a 64GB drive has 64 000 000 000 bytes total according to the manufacturer

Hard drive
1kb = 1000 bytes: 1000*1000*1000*64 = 64 000 000 000 bytes = 64GB

Windows
1kb = 1024 bytes: 64 000 000 000 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 = 59.6GB

plus formatting and filesystem have overhead,so the amount reported can be lower.

the Storage Mfg's are the ones who are wrong thoug..... when you buy storage it's sold in base 10.... when you buy RAM it's in base 2... both are considered "Storage" or "Memory"

RAM Mfgs have it right... Binary is in base 2, computers generally work in base 2, you buy 1024 MB of RAM to get a Gigabyte... you don't get 1000MB of ram ot make a GB... Everything should of been standardized around base 2 from the start

neufuse said,
RAM Mfgs have it right... Binary is in base 2, computers generally work in base 2, you buy 1024 MB of RAM to get a Gigabyte... you don't get 1000MB of ram ot make a GB... Everything should of been standardized around base 2 from the start
To be fair to the hard drive manufacturers, Base 2 lends itself to RAM (as addressing is done with Base 2), but that is far less relevant with hard drives.

Though, if I recall correctly, things were Base 2 originally. Base 10 is just a convenient way to claim extra storage for the manufacturers, and Apple jumped on that bandwagon, possibly because the hardware already had.

_Alexander said,
Who the hell uses decimal system for digital space?

Almost everyone, because they are using SI decimal prefixes like 'kilo' instead of IEC binary prefixes like 'kibi'...

"The numbers shown on the Surface website are a tad confusing, however. That's because, as ZDNet's Ed Bott points out, the page uses the binary system to display how much space is available on the tablets.." oh really? you mean like all computers do? how dare a computer use base 2! Everyone always lists Hard drive and SSD space in base 2, yet they always build the storage space in base 10 for some darn reason... And instead of fixing it, we just pretend its a "math" issue and blame it on base 2.... how about the stroage mfg's start listing the true space on the drive if you write 100GB it should be 100GB in base 2 and show another number for base 10 just to stop the whineing......

So true. Not like MS states space on drives in binary now or anything. Wait, they do.

The misuse of GB vs GiB and TB vs TiB is getting a bit of control by drive manufacturers now that the difference in stated values is much bigger then when the error was smaller due to teh simple low value of GB or MB capacity of drives a few years back. This difference in capacity is horrible on 1TB and larger drives

Commenting is disabled on this article.