Microsoft releases 20,000 lines of code to Linux community

Hell has not frozen over and pigs aren't flying in the sky, Microsoft has just released 20,000 lines of device driver code to the Linux community.

Company officials admitted the move was "a break from the ordinary" but were quick to note this is the first time Microsoft has released code directly to the Linux community. The code will be available to the Linux community and customers and is expected to enhance the performance of the Linux operating system when virtualized on Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V or Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V.

Sam Ramji, senior director of Platform Strategy in Microsoft's Server and Tools organization said in a statement, "Our initial goal in developing the code was to enable Linux to run as a virtual machine on top of Hyper-V, Microsoft's hypervisor and implementation of virtualization.

The Linux device drivers we are releasing are designed so Linux can run in enlightened mode, giving it the same optimized synthetic devices as a Windows virtual machine running on top of Hyper-V."

Due to the economy and consolidation, big enterprises are looking to standardize their virtualization platform, and according to Microsoft "the Linux device drivers will help customers who are running Linux to consolidate their Linux and Windows servers on a single virtualization platform".

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38 Comments

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Driver code huh? When I saw the title about 20,000 lines of code, I thought they were releasing the welcome screen code LOL.

ir0nw0lf said,
Driver code huh? When I saw the title about 20,000 lines of code, I thought they were releasing the welcome screen code LOL.


i thought it was 20,000 packages needed to run a single program in linux that had more then half with broken dependencies thats linux for ya.

I guess that as long as the code submitted follow the principles of Linux, that is a step forward for enhanced interoperability.

Good one Microsoft, good one.

This is a good move. I would definately run say a linux os as a web server on a windows server using hyper-v. I do not see how this could be a bad move at all.

This is a great move. Hyper-V has no potential in the market without supporting most *nix guests, so hopefully this will allow w/e Microsoft's equivalent of VMware Tools to be developed for various *nix OSs. Now Hyper-V just needs to be tweaked to allow the guests to be installed easily to begin with... Haven't used Hyper-V much, but I remember hearing something about having to do a workaround just to install Ubuntu.

toki said,
What a waist... linux dudes will spend years to understand the sources in their "vi" editor...

< snipped > it isn't a waste at all... Looks like you just don't understand anything about Linux/Microsoft/etc.

toki said,
What a waist... linux dudes will spend years to understand the sources in their "vi" editor...

VIM is more commonly used to manage large source products then Visual Studio (or probably arguably, any other IDE). VIM and Emacs are both very full featured IDEs with a steep learning curve but any developer worth their salt should pick them up in hours.

omni said,
VIM is more commonly used to manage large source products then Visual Studio (or probably arguably, any other IDE).

lol
Or should I say Ctrl+Meta+X Alt+Meta+****+lol ? 8)

d3v said,
lol
Or should I say Ctrl+Meta+X Alt+Meta+****+lol ? 8)

I think even if that was a hotkey it would still be more efficient then diving in to 4 deep menus. If you're writing thousands of lines a code a month typing /'whatever youre searching for' is faster then CTRL+F waiting for it to load then diving through a 40mb intellisense database -- same goes for anything else VIM gives you with a funky keystroke.

toki said,
What a waist... linux dudes will spend years to understand the sources in their "vi" editor...

Did you use vi to edit your post?

Stfu, not every body on Linux uses Vim. There are plenty of modern editors available for Linux. And in any case, Vim is better than Visual Studio.

Wow, Microsoft has been making quite a few smart moves lately: Windows 7, Bing, MSE, the new Office suite and now this.

They really have. Don't forget the Zune HD or the Zune Software either ;)

I've started to really love this company again now.

Calum said,
They really have. Don't forget the Zune HD or the Zune Software either ;)

I've started to really love this company again now.


Have you hated it before?

Whoa! Good move! We all know MS is behind in the virtualization game but they're catching up fast. Too bad it'll still be another year or two but you got to give them props for making the right decision.

BTW - I use HyperV and I love it. Especially when combined with SCVMM.

EEE doesn't apply here, they aren't extending Linux with proprietary standards, they're making it compatible with their product so that Linux can operate efficiently virtualized atop Hyper-V.

Yes they are, they are Extending Linux to support their Virtualisation platform. Moving an all-Linux server to have Microsoft components is a small step closer to the next major step.

IMHO it's the only move they could make if they want to compete in virtualization properly! If they didn't do it, it'd make them look stupid!

Chicane-UK said,
IMHO it's the only move they could make if they want to compete in virtualization properly! If they didn't do it, it'd make them look stupid!

Absolutely. I'm glad they decided to do this though. It's definitely a good move.