Microsoft Research reveals Holograph, brings 'Star Wars' Leia hologram to life

All those cool 3D holographic interactive user interfaces that people see in sci-fi movies and TV shows are finally getting closer to reality. Microsoft Research recently showed off a new project called Holograph that was made to render large data, not just in 3D, but in a way that it looks like it is being projected above a display.

In a blog post, Holograph's team leader Curtis Wong talks about how the project can help with creating visuals with data that is put inside, for example, Excel. He states:

That enables anybody with any kind of data, like location or time, to easily plot that data onto a map or globe. If you select ‘date,’ and you have date or time information, you’ll be able to watch that data play out over time.

The fun part of putting all of that data in a 3D projection is shown in the blog post's video, which has Wong using a big Perspective Pixel touchscreen display. Wong views a version of the Earth above or below the plane of that display but still manipulate it. The video also shows how data for a city can be rendered in 3D with graphs and charts created in a view of a city to better show how those numbers relate to things in the real world.

The video also has some fun in showing off how Holograph can make the dreams of sci-fi fans come true, such as one scene where an interactive Viper fighter in "Battlestar Galactica" is created in 3D. The final part of the video shows the famous Princess Leia hologram in "Star Wars" ("You're my only hope.') recreated in 3D via Holograph. Perhaps the whole 3D chess game in that same movie could be the next project for Microsoft Research.

Source: Microsoft

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1) It doesn't look like it is 'above' the screen to me at sll. It just looks like any 3D image on monitor, but with the monitor lying on it's back.

2) It only works from the exact position the camera is in, if you view it from any other angle it won't work as an illusion (assuming you can see it at all).

It's faked and way over hyped. There is good chance that there will never be true holographic displays as it just isn't feasabile.

werdwerdus said,
"above/below" the screen...
I don't think that word means what you think it means...

It's where it looks like it is in relation to the screen. It's an illusion which is fine so long as it works. :)

I love Microsoft . They start everything..But Every time they ####ed up by some company.. and some developers are genius the whole Microsoft development process is slow.. Microsoft has been working on voice recognition technology over a decade ..but they ####ed up by Siri (originally it is not developed by Apple)..after 2 years later they release Cortana.. I don't where this Holography technology goes with Microsoft but i hope it better be Okay..

Tanzim31 said,
I love Microsoft . They start everything..But Every time they ####ed up by some company.. and some developers are genius the whole Microsoft development process is slow.. Microsoft has been working on voice recognition technology over a decade ..but they ####ed up by Siri (originally it is not developed by Apple)..after 2 years later they release Cortana.. I don't where this Holography technology goes with Microsoft but i hope it better be Okay..

Cortana is more than voice, Microsoft had good voice in the 90s but it was mainly used by enterprise for phone systems.

Also in comparison to Siri, Cortana is considerably faster, used both local and speech over IP at the same time.

As for 3d display work, Microsoft has been doing this for many years, the trick is getting the hardware technologies fast and cheap enough to be business or consumer viable.

Even with touch and tablets, Apple didn't invent anything, they just hit the market when the technology became cheap enough to offer to general consumers.

I too understand your frustration, but it takes a lot of work and hardware push to get products to consumers and Microsoft has not been a consumer device company until recently. So this means they have to push hardware companies or create new software requirements, and both trend to po the entire industry, so they drag their feet.

This is amazing. It's just like what you see in movies in spy or FBI scenes in movies. I can see this one day being implemented into Kinect/Xbox one day but also integrated into Office as a new data presentation model. Epicness.