Microsoft rumored to be creating a replacement for the tracking cookies

Soon after the World Wide Web and web browsers came out, websites started installing what later were termed "cookies" when a user visited a site so he or she could be tracked. According to a new report, Microsoft is trying to come up with a more advanced way to track a person's online activities beyond the web browser to products such as its Xbox console and mobile phones, which cannot use cookies.

Ad Age reported, via unnamed sources, that Microsoft's efforts in this project are in an early stage, As such, there's no word on when this cookie replacement might be launched, although the article does hint that it will be put in place last for Xbox consoles. In a statement sent to Ad Age, Microsoft did not confirm or deny that such a project was in place but did say, "We agree that going beyond the cookie is important. Our priority will be to find ways to do this that respect the interests of consumers."

Ironically, Microsoft has been one of the leaders behind the "Do Not Track" trend in web browsers. The company made that setting the default on Internet Explorer 10 and has done so again with IE11. This week, Microsoft's chief privacy officer Brendon Lynch wrote a blog post affirming the company's pledge to support "Do Not Track," even as the World Wide Web Consortium's Tracking Protection Working Group still works to create a standard that will apply to all web browsers. He stated:

Microsoft supports continuing work toward a DNT standard and we hope the representatives of all the other parties that make up the Working Group will do the same. A final, meaningful DNT standard will help build greater trust across the Internet ecosystem, and we look forward to continue working together to achieve this goal.

The W3C posted an online poll which asked its Tracking Protection Working Group members how they should proceed with their discussions. However, the final results of the poll, at least on the surface, do not indicate a huge preference for one course of action. It remains to be seen if the working group will continue in their efforts.

Source: Ad Age | Image via Microsoft

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This article is ********* and doesn't even attempt to relay any of the information from the original linked article. It's as if all the author did was look at the name of Ad Age, and the title of the article. But what else can you expect from a John Callaham article?

next one will be called "Crumbs" and have a scary Hansel and Gretle feel to them. Don't follow the crumbs too deep or you will run into an odd site shaped like a gingerbread house...

Cookies were not created as a method to track users. They was designed to design create persistent preferences that were retained across launches of a web browser.

Advertising agencies then started using them to track users. But when cross-site scripting and other cross-site (cross-domain) security features were implemented, this secondary use of cookies stop working (cookies still worked according to their original design). Ad agencies now need a new way to track users across domains. This is what the article discusses. This is what Google is also creating.

Cookies are not bad. Advertising companies (Google/Microsoft) are bad.

Rosyna said,
Cookies were not created as a method to track users. They was designed to design create persistent preferences that were retained across launches of a web browser.

Advertising agencies then started using them to track users. But when cross-site scripting and other cross-site (cross-domain) security features were implemented, this secondary use of cookies stop working (cookies still worked according to their original design). Ad agencies now need a new way to track users across domains. This is what the article discusses. This is what Google is also creating.

Cookies are not bad. Advertising companies (Google/Microsoft) are bad.

Totally agree, but where exactly does this state Microsoft is building this for ad tracking and not improved user preference tracking? This seemed to me like Microsoft was trying to create a way for Cookies to track user preferences across all of your devices.

NastySasquatch said,
...where exactly does this state Microsoft is building this for ad tracking and not improved user preference tracking?

The entire linked article, which happens to also be reported on a website called "Advertising Age".

Rosyna said,

The entire linked article, which happens to also be reported on a website called "Advertising Age".

What is your point? Did you read the article? AdAge is an industry site and covers more than just things specifically used to target advertising. I don't know if it's the same company that used to do the print edition, but they used to cover a lot of commercial print industry news as well, not just advertisements.

It makes sense that an advertising trade zine would be covering news on something like this even if it wasn't directly used for targeting advertising. Not everything is black and white. Try having a bit of reading comprehension.

The author of this article wrote it to be click bait and fluffed up the advertising potential.

Not much different than Google then. Microsoft want more revenue streams. Taking ads and tracking to the next level is their target to profit more and outdo Google in the next round.

Nah, they'll never be as bad as Google when it comes to tracking. These sound more like better cookies that allow better integration experience across devices when it comes to interacting with the web, not for a revenue stream.