Microsoft still hopeful about being successful with Bing

Microsoft launched its Bing Internet search business in 2009. Now a new and extensive New York Times article takes a detailed look at the Bing side of Microsoft's business. According to the article, industry analysts estimate that developing and supporting Bing costs Microsoft a whopping $5 billion a year. However, the company has yet to put much of a dent in the market share of the search business of its biggest rival Google, which not only has far more users, but can use its huge user base to attract more advertising money. By contrast, Microsoft's online services division, which includes the Bing business, lost $2.53 billion in its last fiscal year that ended in June.

Despite the huge losses, the article says that Microsoft is making some progress. It points out that it has a new agreement with the social networking service Facebook that lets Bing search the "Like" tags of a Facebook user's friends. Microsoft sees a time where people will speak into a smartphone to find a restaurant and a movie for Friday night and Bing software will come up with suggestions based on a user's previous preferences.

Microsoft is still working on Bing application prototypes. The article describes one of them, the Bing Deskbar, that's designed to store search info by different categories. The article states, "It presents information in those categories in large on-screen icons, or tiles, and sorts data by what is most "recent, relevant and frequently used,' as one designer says."

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Cash Money Billionaire said,
bing, zune, wp7....stick to os's Microsoft, while yours still has a majority share

Exactly no company should ever try anything new.

KingCrimson said,

Exactly no company should ever try anything new.

Rather companies should now when to walk away and refocus on what they do best while their brand image is still somewhat intact...microsoft is becoming synonymous with, "out of touch", "old", "boring"..."fail"

I'm not surprised one bit. I've posted links to a Wall Street article on how much money Bing spends to get to where its market share is at today and how much it gets in return

To sum up Microsoft Spends a lot of Money and gets less in return for Bing. It's kind of how the U.S. government does business. And the U.S. is in great shape right now <sarcasm>

Travis Alexander Brown said,

What sucks about it?

Cant you see? a troll said it sucks then it must suck.

/case closed

I don't see how Bing is losing money, I mean I was a Google freak once, but once I heard of Bing, I tried it out and I never turned back, it's just an amazing search engine.

Is Bings market share any reflection on how good they do search? or simply the convoluted process to remove Bing from IE? I mean, I can do it but most non technical people I know wouldn't be able to work it out... so in my mind, Bings audience is most non technical people who use Internet Explorer

kowcop said,
Is Bings market share any reflection on how good they do search? or simply the convoluted process to remove Bing from IE? I mean, I can do it but most non technical people I know wouldn't be able to work it out... so in my mind, Bings audience is most non technical people who use Internet Explorer

That's not entirely true. Most non-technical people are more likely to have some crap search engine as their default because they installed something that changed it. Most of them, who I see, just go straight to Google.com or Bing.com for a few.

Microsoft doesn't need to have a majority of the search market to beat google. To date most of google's revenue still comes from search based advertisement sales. It's their bread and butter. Android is changing that, but today it still the case. Once Microsoft reaches about 25% of the market, marketing companies will have to split their ad dollars between Bing and Google search. This wil hurt Google significantly as right now it is still subsidizing their investment in Android. Despite what google and the market may have some believing Android's marketshare in mobile is tenuous at best. The mobile market is now and always will be highly volatile. A majority of smartphone buyers change their phones every two years. If the market changes and a competitor innovates in an unforeseen way that pulls mobile marketshare away from google, and their "bread and butter" revenues are reduced due to increased competition from Bing, Google might have a troubled future. Their current lead is tenuous at best.

I do very much like Bing search, but the biggest hurdle they face is that Google is now a verb. Much like Skype, but they did alright by that by buying the company!
They do very much need to increase their offerings for the rest of the world, without having all the features, no one will stick to using it.

They surely should be hopeful. Bing doubled it's market share in the US from last year. From 7% to 15% today. And combined with Yahoo it amounts to +30%. That's an incredible pace. But they really need to focus on other countries too.

FMH said,
They surely should be hopeful. Bing doubled it's market share in the US from last year. From 7% to 15% today. And combined with Yahoo it amounts to +30%. That's an incredible pace. But they really need to focus on other countries too.

The lack of worldwide focus is probably why Bing share has been flat for ages and Google has stayed above it's 90% area, source: statcounter

Panda X said,
I believe Bing is miles better than Google (In the US).

Bings problem Number 1...
Still in Beta here for example (AUS)

The biggest benefit of Bing will come from Microsoft getting a better handle on natural search. Even if this doesn't help them claw anything away from Google in the web search market it will lead to a better search in Windows and other Microsoft products.

Frazell Thomas said,
The biggest benefit of Bing will come from Microsoft getting a better handle on natural search. Even if this doesn't help them claw anything away from Google in the web search market it will lead to a better search in Windows and other Microsoft products.

Ok, I'm not sure if you are talking about 'natural search' that returns results in a smarter index of listings. If you are, this would have nothing to do with search in Windows and other Microsoft products. (Google doesn't use Natural Search either, as they are advertising based results.)


If you are refering to 'Natural Language Search Queries', which I think you probably are, then there are some things you are missing that Microsoft already has a handle on.

Bing is a 'bit' behind, as you have noticed, but Microsoft is fully aware.

Bing is a bit more 'aware' than people give it credit. For example, in Bing if you want more 'technical/concise' results, you load the search box with specifics, this basically tells Bing you know what the heck you are doing, and to just spit out results based on what you want. If you use 'average joe' type of searches, it tries to understand what the average joe would be wanting based on the terms entered, and thus it can offer 'Images' or 'Shopping' or 'Directions' that are beyond just web results. Bing does also has the instant answers like Google, so you can do simplistic questions and input 3 +3 = and get a direct result.


As for true and structured search technologies, Microsoft is pretty much the world leader on these technologies, and you can use and find them in MSSQL, Vista, and Windows 7, and beyond them exist what Microsoft Research is working on.


Strangely, because users are still getting use to the concept of using searches to find and aggregate information, Natural Language Search(NQS) is turned off by default in Windows 7.

Here is how to turn it on:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/ee851676.aspx

(For most people, stop reading here, as turning this on will make Searching in Windows become magical.)


As for structured searching, even in Windows 7, you can literally use SQL-Like expressions form anywhere, and from the API set, applications can truly use SQL/AQS/NQS expressions on NTFS and file contents.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...rary/bb231256(v=VS.85).aspx
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...rary/ff684395(v=VS.85).aspx

http://windows.microsoft.com/e...ps-for-searching-in-Windows
http://www.microsoft.com/windo...icalresources/advquery.mspx

And there are other good guides on using some of the advanced 'structured' search terminology, as well as the Help system to explain them.


Windows Serach in Vista and Windows 7 are fairly advanced technologies, which is why when comparisons to OS X's search or other Google Desktop are made, you can literally hear the gasping sounds of any developer that knows the difference and vast contrast in the technologies. Heck, Windows Search on Vista and Windows 7 are even their own development platforms.

Sadly a lot of people don't realize the power that is available to them, and even developers 'recreate' concepts that the Search Engine is already doing for them. Other technologies like Federated Serach haven't been promoted much, and is an amazing integration tool when you can yank images or other content from the web from within Explorer or any application dialog box.

As for Bing, Microsoft does need to add more of what they know, and also add in more structured features as well. They have the technology, and are still fighting what 'users expect' from a search engine, which currently limits some of what they could already be offering.

If you want to see what Microsoft 'knows' on NLQ/NQS technologies, just do a search for natural language microsoft research - they are ahead of the conceptual curve, as what you find is just the public released information, and it is beyond star-trek impressive.