Microsoft talks more about Windows 8 Calendar Metro app

The last two entries on the official Windows 8 developer blog have offered more information on how its People and Mail Metro apps were designed. On Friday, the blog was updated yet again, this time with a new article about the Calendar app for Microsoft's next operating system.

Because the Calendar app was designed to be used by touch interfaces, Microsoft wanted to make sure that when someone used their finger to swipe forward or backward, they didn't jump ahead or behind in the calendar too quickly. The blog states:

To avoid these pitfalls, we went with an approach that enables you to consistently move forward one month at a time–by swiping once, hitting page down on the keyboard, or clicking the Forward button. This makes your experience much more predictable, putting you in control. If you’re in June and you want to arrive at August, you simply click or swipe twice. That’s it. You’re guaranteed never to overshoot the intended target.

Bringing up the Windows 8 app bar in the Calendar app lets users switch modes to view the app via Day, Week or Month designs. When viewing the Calendar in Month mode, users can see two events per day. For each event on the calendar, you can set up a notification to remind you when that event is about to begin. You can also put the Calendar app in "snapped" mode to be viable next to another Windows 8 Metro app.

For those people with particularly busy schedules, the Calendar app can also be switched to look at events two days at a time. The blog states:

The two-day view is useful because making good time management decisions today often requires understanding what’s coming up tomorrow. In addition, this view takes advantage of today’s modern wide-screen displays without adding additional chrome or distractions just to fill up the extra space. As with the other views, it’s simply the calendar grid and your events.

Source: Windows 8 blog | Images via Microsoft

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27 Comments

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"enables you to consistently move forward one month at a time-by swiping once"

This feature deserved a blog post of its own... truly revolutionary!

andrewbares said,
"enables you to consistently move forward one month at a time-by swiping once"

This feature deserved a blog post of its own... truly revolutionary!

Yup, find something to hate no matter how small.

FalseAgent said,

No. The calender app in wp7 is excellent. Bloody excellent.

I guess you never used Outlook or........ WM 6.5:

No week view
No weeks number
No Categories
Month view basically useless
Impossible to set an end date for a recurring, for example weekly activity.
If there are multiple appointments the all day ones do not appear in Day view

To each his own but to me Calendar is one of worst apps of WP7.

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

You get used to it after a while. The thing that annoys me most though is the fact the window is magnetic toward the top.

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

You can close it through the task switcher, though you have to right click first and then pick close. I think though, if a dev wanted to, they could add a close button to their metro app unless the guidelines specifically say you can't and thus your app won't pass.

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

Just middle click the thumbnail in task switcher...

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

I could not agree more.........

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

I'm not complaining much about Metro, but I do see the lack of X buttons to close as being somewhat silly. A big FAT X button is way more intuitive then dragging the mouse across the entire screen to close an app. And the fact that they don't' think we NEED to close apps is even more silly. I'd like to be there when Sinofsky leaves his Facebook page open sometime so I can post his status for him.

jimmyfal said,

I'm not complaining much about Metro, but I do see the lack of X buttons to close as being somewhat silly. A big FAT X button is way more intuitive then dragging the mouse across the entire screen to close an app. And the fact that they don't' think we NEED to close apps is even more silly. I'd like to be there when Sinofsky leaves his Facebook page open sometime so I can post his status for him.


Why do you feel you *need* to close Metro apps, considering Metro apps use no RAM when not in use? Just wondering I tend to close Metro apps, but I'm not sure why; maybe it's because I like my task switcher to be clean and tidy. Still, I don't need to, and I will probably stop closing them at some point. Closing them by dragging them down hasn't been an issue for me. Personally, I feel a big, fat Close button on Metro apps would ruin the look and feel of them all.

M_Lyons10 said,
I still wish we had close buttons. I hate dragging to close with a mouse...

I, personally, feel that a Close button on the user interface of Metro apps would ruin the look and feel of them all, especially if it was a standard for them all to be in the same place and of the same style. There are no standard UI elements on the canvas of a Metro app; the standard UI element that has controls is the app bar. If the Close button was on the app bar, I wouldn't mind. Or, it could maybe be an option in the PC Settings: See Close buttons on all apps or not.

jimmyfal said,

I'm not complaining much about Metro, but I do see the lack of X buttons to close as being somewhat silly. A big FAT X button is way more intuitive then dragging the mouse across the entire screen to close an app. And the fact that they don't' think we NEED to close apps is even more silly. I'd like to be there when Sinofsky leaves his Facebook page open sometime so I can post his status for him.


you really don't need to close metro apps - the system automatically unloads programs that you no longer are using from memory.

And just like most Metro apps it's horrifically oversized with limited functionality. They should rename Metro to 'Mobile Apps' just to make it clear that they're not designed for desktop use.

theyarecomingforyou said,
And just like most Metro apps it's horrifically oversized with limited functionality. They should rename Metro to 'Mobile Apps' just to make it clear that they're not designed for desktop use.

You're right they should make it smaller and not use the available space so it's harder to see. It's a calendar, do you want it to stream movies?

theyarecomingforyou said,
And just like most Metro apps it's horrifically oversized with limited functionality. They should rename Metro to 'Mobile Apps' just to make it clear that they're not designed for desktop use.

I like the metro apps and I'm using a desktop. They maybe lack some functionality but they are simple and give me what I need. I can quickly see if I have anything coming up, I get reminders, and I can easily add stuff.

theyarecomingforyou said,
And just like most Metro apps it's horrifically oversized with limited functionality. They should rename Metro to 'Mobile Apps' just to make it clear that they're not designed for desktop use.

It's a calendar.. So what if it uses a lot of space. If it didn't it would just be white space. And if it was whitespace you'd just say "OMFG METRO HAS TOO MUCH WHITE SPACES LULZ".

TheArgonaut said,
You're right they should make it smaller and not use the available space so it's harder to see. It's a calendar, do you want it to stream movies?

It's not "using" the available space - it's wasting it. With desktop programs you can simply resize them and run two side-by-side, yet with Metro you either run them fullscreen or in a very limited side-snap mode.

I'm sure Metro apps are great on a tablet but they are too restrictive on the desktop, especially on larger monitors.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It's not "using" the available space - it's wasting it. With desktop programs you can simply resize them and run two side-by-side, yet with Metro you either run them fullscreen or in a very limited side-snap mode.

I'm sure Metro apps are great on a tablet but they are too restrictive on the desktop, especially on larger monitors.

Metro apps in full screen are only limited by what the developer decides to do with them. They can fill it up with more "options" or w/e if they want or they can just scale the elements bigger on bigger screens to keep them simple. This has very little to do with metro and the APIs really. Once we start to see more advanced apps this will become apparent to more people though. Also, though I didn't read the blog post yet, the one before this for the email app does state flat out that they're still going to be adding more features and so on, so I think by RTM we'll see the apps become more "full" so they're not "wasting space" like everyone says.

GP007 said,

Metro apps in full screen are only limited by what the developer decides to do with them. They can fill it up with more "options" or w/e if they want or they can just scale the elements bigger on bigger screens to keep them simple. This has very little to do with metro and the APIs really. Once we start to see more advanced apps this will become apparent to more people though. Also, though I didn't read the blog post yet, the one before this for the email app does state flat out that they're still going to be adding more features and so on, so I think by RTM we'll see the apps become more "full" so they're not "wasting space" like everyone says.

Well I do not see why in the moth view you cannot see more than two appointments; not that I particularly care because I use Outlook still these kind of decisions puzzle me.

Fritzly said,

Well I do not see why in the moth view you cannot see more than two appointments; not that I particularly care because I use Outlook still these kind of decisions puzzle me.

Is it for a fact limited to just 2 or is that all we see in the example screenshot? I haven't used the calendar app because I also use Outlook 2k7, but even for that, in full screen, in month view, I think I can see like, hmm, maybe 4 or 5 appointments in the square. When I keep it windowed and a bit smaller though it's often 2 or 3 max from what I've seen.

GP007 said,

Is it for a fact limited to just 2 or is that all we see in the example screenshot? I haven't used the calendar app because I also use Outlook 2k7, but even for that, in full screen, in month view, I think I can see like, hmm, maybe 4 or 5 appointments in the square. When I keep it windowed and a bit smaller though it's often 2 or 3 max from what I've seen.

It is mentioned in the article, so I guess it is correct.
Looking at the picture of the month view I would say that at least a third appointment could be easily added.

Fritzly said,

It is mentioned in the article, so I guess it is correct.
Looking at the picture of the month view I would say that at least a third appointment could be easily added.

I agree, 3 should be possible, it should just scale depending on the screen res/size. If the squares have the room they should show more.

GP007 said,

I agree, 3 should be possible, it should just scale depending on the screen res/size. If the squares have the room they should show more.


Umm pretty sure you can have more than 2 appointments on a block. I've got one day on my calendar that has 3 different listings on it. Unless I'm totally misunderstanding what it is you're talking about.

SharpGreen said,

Umm pretty sure you can have more than 2 appointments on a block. I've got one day on my calendar that has 3 different listings on it. Unless I'm totally misunderstanding what it is you're talking about.

We are talking about this passage in the article:
"When viewing the Calendar in Month mode, users can see two events per day."