Microsoft to launch one final update for Visual Studio 2012

Microsoft has already launched a preview version of Visual Studio 2013, the next entry in its software development tool series. However, owners of the current Visual Studio 2012 can look forward to at least one more update for that product.

Microsoft launched a release candidate build for Visual Studio 2012 Update 4 this week. The change notes for the update show that it is being released mostly to fix a number of bugs centered on the software's Team Foundation Server features.

A Microsoft spokesperson told ZDNet that there are no plans to add any more new features for Visual Studio 2012, although it may receive some more security or bug fixes if any more problems pop up. The development of new Visual Studio features has now moved completely towards the upcoming 2013 edition.

Microsoft has already announced Visual Studio 2013 will add 5000 new APIs along with a application power management tool that will allow developers to simulate just how much battery life is being taken up by the app. The final version is expected to be made available later this year, around the time Windows 8.1 should go into its RTM phase.

Source: Microsoft via ZDNet | Image via Microsoft

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Now you are REALLY reaching - VS2012 is NOT a ModernUI application, nor can you even develop MUI applications with it. (That is the province of VS2013, which, as the OP points out, is available in Preview form today.) That is the VS 2012 portal gateway - a standard feature with Visual Studio for years (not just Team Foundation - the version shown).

PGHammer said,
Now you are REALLY reaching - VS2012 is NOT a ModernUI application, nor can you even develop MUI applications with it. (That is the province of VS2013, which, as the OP points out, is available in Preview form today.) That is the VS 2012 portal gateway - a standard feature with Visual Studio for years (not just Team Foundation - the version shown).

wait, what? we've been developing modernUI apps with VS2012 for over a year now.. and VS2012 started to be "modern esc" with a lot of it's UI's sure it's a desktop app, but they started to switch the design in 2012... and yes a lot of the UI's designs leave a lot to be desired...

PGHammer said,
Now you are REALLY reaching - VS2012 is NOT a ModernUI application, nor can you even develop MUI applications with it. (That is the province of VS2013, which, as the OP points out, is available in Preview form today.) That is the VS 2012 portal gateway - a standard feature with Visual Studio for years (not just Team Foundation - the version shown).
Say the color looks ugly, receive nerdout about VS not being able to develop metro apps.

the main problem with these constant releases is that you end up with all of them installed to cover all bases!

i currently have 2005, 8, 10, 12, plus the data tools and BIDS and jsut don't want the hassle of installing the 13 beta

blarghhh!

BGM said,
the main problem with these constant releases is that you end up with all of them installed to cover all bases!

I guess you didn't hear... .NET Targeting Profiles (since VS 2010) allows you to leverage a whole slew of .NET Frameworks without necessarily using a particular IDE. So, with VS2010, you can open pre-.NET4 projects and compile them any which way. VS2012 augmented that support even more by not killing the previous-version project files.

I use VS2010 @ work for all .NET 4-and-below development; VS2012 @ home for all .NET 4.5-plus dev.

SQL SSMS and BIDS are simply toolkits compiled with the previous-gen VS IDE Shell.

Nas said,

stuff...

i do mostly business intelligence projects, and you can't run / open things in other versions of visual studio / bids without upgrading them, at least as far as i know!

having to support multiple clients with projects developed in multiple versions of VS is a pain i nthe ass, and while i agree they can be upgraded.... if the clients are still using Visual Studio 2005 then i'm out of luck and have to continue to use that one. I think cross IDE was only properly available in Visual Studio 2012 tbh

Another massive pain in the bum is that Microsoft keep releasing new version of VS with less features than previous versions!! Then they play 'catch-up' with service packs, which is kinda fine, but again it results in needing to have more than one version installed for when SP have not been released.

I received a project file from a client the other week to do a POC on, with big plans on just opening it up in the latest version, upgrading it and showing off the functionality i wanted to demonstrate.. in the end i needed to install an older version of VS just so that i could read / deploy the Database project that they had sent me, as for unknown reason it couldn't be deployed.. i can't even remember the exact problem now, but the Visual Studio suite is a ****ing mess imo as having the 'latest' version does not afford you complete functionality..

Hell, until recently database schema compare wasn't even part of SSDT 2012, so i had to have SSDT 2010 installed too!! - again, it was added with a Service Pack

M_Lyons10 said,
You develop in a VM?

I've been doing *everything* in VMs for at least a year now. I've maxed out the RAM (32GB) in my fastest machine and run nothing but virtual machines on it. Backing up my important machines simply consists of a batch file calling robocopy. I don't bother backing up the host itself, as there's nothing on it but the base OS and a driver or two.

I use Remote Desktop to connect to those VMs from anywhere--an 8-year old machine with a triple-head card, a laptop, my Surface Pro, whatever. Doesn't matter how the machines I use to connect with are performing; they're not the ones doing the heavy lifting. At any given time, I have at least 6-8 VMs running, each with anywhere between 2 and 8GB of RAM.

First SQL Server ditches the per processor model and goes to per-core and drives our costs up 70%.... then Visual studio goes to a yearly release cycle and we still pay almost $14k a copy (we actually use features in ultimate edition)... of course we never bought SA because we never seemed to make it to a new version in time when we did to justify it... now we are releasing yearly... I sure hope 2013 is a cheap upgrade for those who are on 2012 (thankfully this time we DID buy SA with 2012 for 2yrs) but there are ones who didn't...

Brony said,
MS did it again, "discontinuing" a product in a snap. Sheesh, Visual Studio is not a cheaper product.

Agreed. I hope the price now reflects these yearly releases...

Brony said,
MS did it again, "discontinuing" a product in a snap. Sheesh, Visual Studio is not a cheaper product.

What are you talking about? No more new features doesn't mean discontinued. End of support is in 2020... There's always a new version with a new build of Windows. Typically hobbyists use the free version and professionals are subscribers anyway.

Max Norris said,

What are you talking about? No more new features doesn't mean discontinued. End of support is in 2020... There's always a new version with a new build of Windows. Typically hobbyists use the free version and professionals are subscribers anyway.

It is just MS rhetoric. No updated = no support.

For example. MS supported (and may be still support some Windows-CE platform), however, it is painful hard to work with it, for example, while it is, so called, supported, some part of the software is not supported. Then, it is not strange to find working in a legacy machine just because modern machines / OS does not support the supported-platform.

Brony said,
It is just MS rhetoric. No updated = no support.

For example. MS supported (and may be still support some Windows-CE platform), however, it is painful hard to work with it, for example, while it is, so called, supported, some part of the software is not supported. Then, it is not strange to find working in a legacy machine just because modern machines / OS does not support the supported-platform.


You're reaching here.. yea the old stuff is still be supported... on the platform it was designed for. Visual Studio 2003 is technically still supported until October of this year... doesn't mean it's magically going to be guaranteed to run on an operating system released 10 years after the product was released. Support means just that.. support and security patches, not major rewrites. System requirements still apply.

It's probably because most developers are on a subscription model now.

On a subscription, but I will say this... it's still not cheap!

LegendaryRamzi said,
It's probably because most developers are on a subscription model now.

I don't know that that's really the case...

What would be nice is if MS offered a low cost upgrade option, say $50, if moving from VS2012 to VS2013 while not on a subscription