Microsoft to release an updated malicious software removal tool with Patch Tuesday

On the second Tuesday of every month, Microsoft releases patches for all of its software platforms. The day, commonly referred to as 'Patch Tuesday,' arrives next week and this time around there will be 9 updates in total with two of them being rated critical.

The critical bugs affect Windows and Internet Explorer; the Windows bugs are limited to Windows 7 and Windows 8 Professional and Business editions. Internet Explorer, on the other hand, affects all versions on all supported platforms. The other, non-critical updates, affect Office, SQL Server, .Net Framework, SharePoint Server 2013 and Windows.

Along with the patches, Microsoft will push out an updated version of the Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool tool; nothing else was said about what the update to the tool will include.

Microsoft has always been open about patching its software and for those of you who were concerned about the company ending the practice of sending out email alerts about the updates, the practice has been resumed. The initial issue causing the patches to be stopped was believed to be related to a Canadian anti-spam law being passed but that concern has been remediated. 

And of course, Microsoft will be pushing out its August Update as well on Tuesday that will include enhancements to Windows 8.1

Source: Microsoft

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I don't mind having multiple reboots. The real annoyance is when one selects multiple updates, and one or more don't install because it conflicts with one or more other updates also selected. One would think that, if updates have to installed in a certain order, MS would recognize the updates selected and then proceed to install the updates in their correct order. Or, if that can't happen, then alert one to "please install updates X, Y, and Z after final reboot."

Yes,
That's the part that ticks me off the most!

To the people who complain about having to reboot after updates.
Who gives a crap about having to reboot once a month anyway. Are your computers really that messed up or slow, that you feel as if your life will come to an end if a reboot is required? Or, are you afraid you might miss some stupid Facebook profile update, or something! ;)

The removal tool news aside one thing they still haven't somehow managed to work on is the need o reboot/restart so much after installing patches. I think they need to try harder to do away with more of the times you need to do so, heck I remember when making network changes or installing a video driver needed a restart, those are long gone, time to cut down on that more IMO.

George P said,
The removal tool news aside one thing they still haven't somehow managed to work on is the need o reboot/restart so much after installing patches. I think they need to try harder to do away with more of the times you need to do so, heck I remember when making network changes or installing a video driver needed a restart, those are long gone, time to cut down on that more IMO.

I worked on my Sisters PC over last weekend to get it up to date and to remove Malware and Viruses. The thing that really stood out for me was all the endless reboots! I use a Mac and I never have to reboot it that much.

George P said,
The removal tool news aside one thing they still haven't somehow managed to work on is the need o reboot/restart so much after installing patches. I think they need to try harder to do away with more of the times you need to do so, heck I remember when making network changes or installing a video driver needed a restart, those are long gone, time to cut down on that more IMO.

Windows can't update system level components while they are being used.

Well, actually MS can hotpatch components, but that would be dangerous as most software are not designed to deal with changes in the component they are using while they are being run. Since a lot of 3rd party apps use some of IE components (winhttp, mshtml, ...) it's safer to force a reboot rather than arbitrary change the components and make 3rd party apps crash. Same thing for kernel and core APIs.

(funny fact, IE9 was able to be installed without rebooting the system. But that required to close every app having a dependency on IE, including explorer.exe. So it's actually easier to explain the user that the systems needs to be rebooted after an IE update rather that forcing him to close apps individually)

Don't forget, a reboot isn't required to install any patch. The reboot is required for that patch to take effect. If you can deal with the patch changes not taking effect, you can just do your reboot the next time you normally would. They don't force you to reboot, you can postpone indefinitely.

link8506 said,

Windows can't update system level components while they are being used.

Well, actually MS can hotpatch components, but that would be dangerous as most software are not designed to deal with changes in the component they are using while they are being run. Since a lot of 3rd party apps use some of IE components (winhttp, mshtml, ...) it's safer to force a reboot rather than arbitrary change the components and make 3rd party apps crash. Same thing for kernel and core APIs.

(funny fact, IE9 was able to be installed without rebooting the system. But that required to close every app having a dependency on IE, including explorer.exe. So it's actually easier to explain the user that the systems needs to be rebooted after an IE update rather that forcing him to close apps individually)

I'm aware of the whys and so on, just saying they should work on cutting down the need more and more, not too much to ask for.

Someday we'll get there! We should eventually get to a point in the future where every single aspect of a system can be updated or changed on the fly. Someday. lol