Microsoft wants Windows XP's market share to be below 10 percent by support cut off

On April 8th, 2014, Microsoft will officially cut off support for Windows XP, over 12 years since it officially launched.  Despite its age, the OS is still used by a ton of people around the world. The latest figures from Net Applications shows that Windows XP is currently installed on over 37 percent of all PCs worldwide.

Microsoft has been warning about the support cut off date for Windows XP for well over a year. During a session held at Microsoft's Worldwide Partners Conference this week, ZDNet reports that Erwin Visser, the General Manager of Windows Commercial, stated that Microsoft is making the push to get businesses to stop using Windows XP a priority before April 8th.

Needless to say, this will be a pretty major task. Visser stated that to beat the deadline, 586,000 Windows XP PCs will need to be upgraded to at least Windows 7 per day. In reality, Microsoft's goal is to get the market share for Windows XP below 10 percent before April 8th arrives.

Microsoft is offering a variety of programs to help businsses update to either Windows 7 or 8. It's also working with other PC OEMs to reach its goal. One of them is HP, which has launched a program that includes an offer for HP ElitePad notebooks at special prices for businesses that make the move to ditch Windows XP for Windows 8.

Source: ZDNet | Image via HP

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Dot Matrix said,

There was a reason Microsoft dumped the XP codebase for the Server codebase during development).

Thank you for really showing how much you know about computers in that comment. You might want to do a little more research on the progression from NT > 2k > 2K3 > 2K8 and 98 > Me > XP > Vista.

Release dates say nothing about codebase.

Win98-ME are 9x, not even NT kernel, not even related to his post.

XP comes from Windows 2000, a desktop NT version.

Vista comes from Win2003, at least that what wasn't rewritten since a lot has been.

And Win7 and Win8 appear to have parts based on Midori as well. (not comfirmed by MS though)

Bogdan Calapod said,
Don't get me wrong - I love Linux and I'd use it daily.

But try doing serious media work on it. (read: advertising/video). You can't.


In his defense. If more people would use Linux, those programs would also be available on Linux, like many are for OSX.

Sad but true, although Win7 is still more upto date now, 4 years after release then XP was doing 4 years after its release. If we would ignore the change in hardware in those 4 years after XP and the little changes hardware has undergone the last 4 years.

It's about the apps, not the OS. Apps (Office/web/email) get the work done/bring in the money (not WordPad/Paint/Windows 8 Start screen).

But x64 helps a lot with media tasks...

68k said,
It's about the apps, not the OS. Apps (Office/web/email) get the work done/bring in the money (not WordPad/Paint/Windows 8 Start screen).

But x64 helps a lot with media tasks...

Are you saying all you can do on Windows 8 is Paint and Wordpad? Because I recall being able to do Office/Web/Email on my Win8 machines, with the Start Screen making many tasks easier than without it.

Hell, I'm replying to this on Windows 8 with an employer owned device!

I bet you didn't know Paint was so robust in Win8, did you?

/s

Office/web/email apps that run on XP are still fully compatible with the latest standards.

I would never use IE on XP - it always was the slowest browser.

68k said,
Office/web/email apps that run on XP are still fully compatible with the latest standards.

I would never use IE on XP - it always was the slowest browser.


You must've never tried Netscape or the Mozilla browser on XP in IE6's release time.

It might happen. The people still using XP are large educational institutions and large businesses. Only a tiny fraction of people still run XP for home usage. Love it or hate it, schools and businesses are going to choose Windows 7 because of its proven stability and because they don't have to retrain staff--which cost money. As for home users, they'll get off it eventually.

I actually still encounter XP plenty in home use. If I'd use it as statistics I'm guessing close to 10% of the people.

I upgraded my sister to Win8 from XP just a few days ago.

The problem is the home user has no comprehension of security updates, all they will see is after April 2014 their computer is still working just fine.

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