Microsoft warns corporate users of auto-update to IE7

Microsoft Corp. has warned corporate administrators that it will push a new version of Internet Explorer 7 their way next month, and has posted guidelines on how to ward off the automatic update if they want to keep the older IE6 browser on their companies' machines.

The IE7 upgrade scheduled to roll out via WSUS (Windows Server Update Services) on Feb. 12 was announced last October, when Microsoft said it would no longer require users to prove they owned a legitimate copy of Windows XP before they were allowed to download the newer browser. Microsoft explained that the move was prompted by security concerns.

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I've actually felt the past few weeks that it is ok to deploy IE7.

We had been staying away from it, because of issues that supposedly may happen. Well, I haven't read about any issues, and the few who have been using IE7 haven't mentioned any issues, so it seems safe enough.

The "our company's web apps are not compatible" argument always comes up. You'd think that for those companies it would be highly beneficial to upgrade to IE7 and also to either upgrade or overhaul their web applications for more security and better standards support. No, it won't happen overnight and it'll most likely cost something but IMO it's worth the effort.

If you ask me, IE6 needs to go away. The faster the better. It's a terrible piece of crap.

"You'd think that for those companies it would be highly beneficial to upgrade to IE7 and also to either upgrade or overhaul their web applications for more security and better standards support."

Unfortunately, companies don't see it that (at least managers don't). It's easier to do nothing (my company is in the same boat...entire roll out of IE7 stalled because of one app).

Take a look at my comment above. It is NOT just web apps that are in danger of this upgrade. The app that broke in our case was a standalone engineering drawing management tool and it's viewer. Believe me, it was really hard to diagnose why it was suddenly not working. Took quite a while to determine that it was the freaking BROWSER update that caused this problem. If you have not worked in a corporate environment before and think it's no big deal, you are wrong. Period.

Since MultipleIE can be installed on XP, couldn't corporations simply update IE to IE7 and install MultipleIE's IE6 for those pesky webapps etc that don't work? Of course knowing how ignorant the average office worker often is, it would probably blow their mind if they had to use two versions of a program.

...it'll most likely cost something but IMO it's worth the effort.

Except corporates couldn't care less about your opinion. What they see is:
Browser is used to run required application. It works fine. Tech guys come along and say that there is a new "better" version of browser that breaks application and it'll take X man days costing Y thousands to fix it. Management doesn't see this new version as better as it costs to implement it and remain in the same state, whereas not implementing it costs nothing.
Where money and productivity is concerned $0 far outweighs $20,000 for no real difference.

Sure are a lot of people resistant to change. Spend 5 minutes to adjust to the new interface and then enjoy the new features and security. Sheesh.

I would think that corporate IT users would see the security benefits alone from upgrading to IE7. Its been out for what, just under 2 years now and still people can't upgrade their networks? Maybe thats why we have so many breaches in security from big companies these days. They are too lazy or cheap to stay up to date with the most secure software. And if your software is not compatible with IE7, thats really the sign of poor software, especially after almost 2 years. As far as users complaining, its basically the same, I assume you would have complaints, but then people would learn to use it and like it.

Is it by chance EMatrix? We use that here in my office. Limited here in the States, but many of our European offices are using it quite heavily. But the Java version can't be higher than 1.2.2(ish) or it may not work and they certainly won't support it. I hate this freaking program. Or, I should say, I hate out implementation of it.

But, on topic, we use a different drawing management tool here for our projects and the IE7 update killed the built in viewer for it. Fortunately, we were able to find out the problem and fixed it with a couple of renamed dll files. We were lucky that is all IE7 broke.

Obviously you've never worked in a corporate IT environment. Look at it like this: we have over 65,000 users, and double the applications. Most of the web applications were developed for IE6. Do you think it would be a realistic goal to have every single application upgraded to support IE7? No, considering we are a Government serving the Province of Ontario, which has to serve the public, and any disruption in service disrupts the public. I don't think I need to tell you how badly that would go over, especially if someone was trying to renew their health card, drivers license, etc.

As with some of the other people here, companies or corporations have web applications that have not been updated to use IE 7.

I work for a Toyota dealer, and I see this everyday. Toyota is using an outdated JRE ( 1.2.2 ) while the rest of the world is on either 5 or 6. This is because a major web application that they use isn't supported by the newer safer JRE. It sucks because it causes problems with HP printers and you can't use Firefox.

Hello,

I think it should be optional, most of the corporate companys here dont have software they run supporting ie7

Tight Line's

What a f***ing stupid move. Why on earth should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure browser? Any computer that supports it should be forced to update to IE7 - and really, Microsoft should of added support for Windows 2000 as well.

Matt T said,
What a f***ing stupid move. Why on earth should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure browser? Any computer that supports it should be forced to update to IE7 - and really, Microsoft should of added support for Windows 2000 as well.

so you are saying that they should force ie7 on companies? whether or not their intraweb is compatible with it? good thinking, sherlock

I for one, will be trying to block this at work. We have an issue with ie7 that causes computers to not log users off. We do want ie7 but until we figure out how to fix this problem we have to wait...

Matt T said,
What a f***ing stupid move. Why on earth should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure browser? Any computer that supports it should be forced to update to IE7 - and really, Microsoft should of added support for Windows 2000 as well.

Where I work, we have a lot of computer users that are forced to use a web application that we develop, and although we (the dev team) use IE7, a lot of the users are completely computer illiterate. We get at least one phone call a day from a user of our App telling us that the fact that there is a new feature has completely shattered their ability to use the system, and we can't even begin to imagine what would happen if we forced a new interface to their 'internet' on them, so until we can convince everyone that IE7 is a good thing, we will be sticking with IE6.

Matt T said,
What a f***ing stupid move. Why on earth should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure browser? Any computer that supports it should be forced to update to IE7 - and really, Microsoft should of added support for Windows 2000 as well.

That's the dumbest thing i've heard so far today.. And you've obviously never worked in a corporate network.

compass4 said,
That's the dumbest thing i've heard so far today.. And you've obviously never worked in a corporate network.

Its not so much dumb as it is unrealistic. And it is unrealistic because the average corporate network is filled with the stupidest people you'll hope you ever have the misfortune of interacting with.

people flipping burgers at Mcdonalds don't need to worry about IE 7, they only need to interact with that 'spatula'

Relativity_17 said,

Its not so much dumb as it is unrealistic. And it is unrealistic because the average corporate network is filled with the stupidest people you'll hope you ever have the misfortune of interacting with.

All of the above. Dumb, unrealistic, stupid people, etc......

WILL NOT be installing it here. In fact, just recently removed it from all 7 machines after checking it out again and remembering why I didn't like it the first time!

Matt T said,
What a f***ing stupid move. Why on earth should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure browser? Any computer that supports it should be forced to update to IE7 - and really, Microsoft should of added support for Windows 2000 as well.

You do understand there are companies where a lot of applications are dependent on certain revisions of browsers right? Migrating those applications is not simple, it's time consuming and a lot of testing has to be done.

compass4 said,

That's the dumbest thing i've heard so far today.. And you've obviously never worked in a corporate network.

I'll give you a simple example - When I upgrade my home pc's to IE7 my dad got ****ed off the first day why this "new" program is here and his old trusted browser was gone! He had a big trouble in the first day finding his favorites and surfing to the sites he is used to. Without me going with him step by step and explaining everything all over again that nothing is changed and IE7 is just an upgrade and even the new features are useful (he was lost using tabs and always kept opening new window instead). and explaining how to reach his favorites again.

So take this single case and multiply it by hundreds and good luck explaining to every single person how to get used to using the new version.

So IE6 is "outdated and less secure" but Windows 2000 is not? With that reasoning, why "should Microsoft allow anybody, whether they're a corporate user or not, stick with an outdated and less secure" operating system? That reasoning isn't very logical.

Relativity_17 said,

Its not so much dumb as it is unrealistic. And it is unrealistic because the average corporate network is filled with the stupidest people you'll hope you ever have the misfortune of interacting with.

lol...You're spot on.

hmm....maybe Matt T is one of them people.