Microsoft will now tell you if you are a jerk on Xbox Live

The launch of the Xbox One console in November also introduced the idea of online player reputations for Microsoft's game console. Today, the company announced that it will begin to send out notifications to players who need to boost their reputation scores.

As we have previously reported, Microsoft uses colors to represent Xbox One player reputation levels, with "Green" linked with "Good Player," "Yellow" meaning the score "Needs Work" and "Red" standing for "Avoid Me." In a post on Xbox Wire, Microsoft stated, "Beginning this month, some players will start receiving reputation warnings as their reputations drop due to feedback from the community."

If a player sees his or her online reputation fall into the Red level, they may experience limitations on playing games on the Xbox One until they can boost their score up. That may also include not being able to broadcast games via the Twitch app. On the other side of  the equation, Microsoft says it has plans to offer rewards for players who are in the green and have been rated as having a good online reputation. Details about those plans should be released in the future. Microsoft insists that their algorithm will adjust if some people attempt to make false reports against Xbox One players.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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D. FiB3R said,
It pisses me off (far more than it should) that the green bar for "good", doesn't completely fill the meter.

Amen Brother!
Obviously no one is that good. haha

D. FiB3R said,
It pisses me off (far more than it should) that the green bar for "good", doesn't completely fill the meter.

It's a meter based on community votes. It probably starts at full, and then decreases a little as people down vote you (to prevent people from abusing the system).

j2006 said,

It's a meter based on community votes. It probably starts at full, and then decreases a little as people down vote you (to prevent people from abusing the system).

But their downvotes only count if they've actually been in a game with you.

And a handful of downvotes indicating isolated incidents wouldn't count either.

You really only lose reputation if a lot of people who engaged you in-game downvoted you within a short period of time....and then your reputation would gradually improve again as long as no new downvotes came.

Joshie said,

But their downvotes only count if they've actually been in a game with you.

And a handful of downvotes indicating isolated incidents wouldn't count either.

You really only lose reputation if a lot of people who engaged you in-game downvoted you within a short period of time....and then your reputation would gradually improve again as long as no new downvotes came.

Pretty much. Negative votes are pretty damaging to your reputation, but Microsoft counts each null vote as a positive one. E.g if you join a battlefield 4 server and nobody avoided your gamertag, it would count as 63 positive votes.

McKay said,

Pretty much. Negative votes are pretty damaging to your reputation, but Microsoft counts each null vote as a positive one. E.g if you join a battlefield 4 server and nobody avoided your gamertag, it would count as 63 positive votes.

Yup. I really can't imagine why someone would be upset with this system unless they (a) don't understand how it works, (b) have found a serious flaw that could be exploited in a believable scenario, or (c) are one of the jerks.

Would be interested to know what would stop people from marking people bad just out of spite.

Good move since I avoid playing with random people since people like to act tough and say things while hiding behind the screen. When the first elections with Obama, the racists really crawled out of the woodwork.

Smart models with enough data can recognize and ignore that kind of vindictive activity.

(whether their model is sufficiently smart is a different question, but it can be done)

techbeck said,
Would be interested to know what would stop people from marking people bad just out of spite.

Good move since I avoid playing with random people since people like to act tough and say things while hiding behind the screen. When the first elections with Obama, the racists really crawled out of the woodwork.

You'd have to campaign against a single person and even then it'd be obvious. If you get a few bad apples that are just dinging you out of spite it won't affect you. The dings start when you go into a game lobby and start insulting people, bad mouthing people, berating people, etc. Trends will set in and your rep will go down.

It's a good thing. I say put all the @sshats into games with themselves and let them have at it. It's one reason I don't play online much anymore - so many idiots. I just want to play a g'damn game. :p

techbeck said,
Would be interested to know what would stop people from marking people bad just out of spite.

Good move since I avoid playing with random people since people like to act tough and say things while hiding behind the screen. When the first elections with Obama, the racists really crawled out of the woodwork.


The system would detect people who regularly give down votes and they'd probably be tagged for review in the system. Trolls are easy to detect with such a system if you look for them.

Oh and here I was thinking there was a level above Good.

So does your reputation go down when you ram people off the track intentionally on Forza?

PurpleHaze420 said,

Nothing wrong with a good tea-bagging. Lol..


that depends on who's getting tea bagged. I would not enjoy being on the receiving end

Why does the article say Microsoft will tell you if you're a jerk? It's not Microsoft, it's other users, "as their reputations drop due to feedback from the community" So many of your articles seem to have this negative vibe toward Microsoft John, or at least in the title of the article.

Correct, it's based on user ratings and the system auto-generates the message. Microsoft isn't monitoring this and picking and choosing who's good. I don't know if John actually plays Xbox Live games (and even Playstation games), but he'd know there are some pretty bad jerks who ruin the experience for everyone, so this system sounds great to me.

Yeah way to many asshats online nowadays. Don't know for sure as I was in my early teens when I actively started using the internet for more than downloading a song or 2.
But the general internetting community USED to be quite nice and friendly 15 years ago. There where trolls but it was different, it was just for fun. Not to actually be a total troll or that your one pleasure in life is trolling others to be "cool".
We werent cool for using the internet, we were the opposite.

Nowadays so many people think its so cool to be an online ######, giving them some kind of e-penis.
Plus the For The Win gameplay attitude, if you're playing public matches in BF4 for example... those 110-120 levels always _HAVE_ to show their dominance. The games that are "just for fun" attitude are rare. I used to have that all the time in UT/RA etc. People played "Just For Fun" and not "For The Win".

Go Microsoft, wish Steam and Sony implemented a similar feature. MS has already had something like this, you could report individuals for rtard behavior and XBL matching would in the future not match you up with the same rtards you reported.
I absolutely loved this feature on XBL when I had a 360, most used feature.

Unfortunately, the reporting system is all bark and no bite. One person can send another person a message saying " I will rape u" and even if they are reported no action will be taken. Even if the threat was followed through, I doubt their xbl account would get banned.

Offering rewards is sadly the only way to improve online actions. Even then, the entitlement-ers wouldn't be persuaded by a reward system and would carry on with their asshattery.

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