Microsoft: Windows 7 RTM support ends April 9, 2013

Microsoft may have just launched Windows 8 a few months ago, but there are still plenty of people who are using Windows 7 inside their PC. In fact, there may be some of you reading this that are using the same version of Windows 7 that was first released in 2009 but have yet to download the first (and apparently only) service pack released for the OS.

If you happen to be one of those Windows 7 users, you might want to consider downloading and installing SP1 as soon as possible. Microsoft updated the official Windows blog with word that official support for Windows 7 RTM will end in just a couple months. The support will stop on April 9, 2013, about 24 months after the launch of the Windows 7 service pack.

If you have a PC with Windows 7 SP1 installed, don't worry; official mainstream support for Windows 7 won't end until January 13, 2015. Extended support for the OS (meaning security patches but no new features) won't end until January 14, 2020. In any case, it is in your best interest to download and install that service pack, if only to keep your system up to date with the most recent version of the OS.

Source: Windows blog

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24 Comments

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NO SP1?? I thought that was already considered a misdemeanor by now
But seriously, the service packs and updates are here for a reason. But in defense of those people who have no updates, many don't know how to update, or even how to activate windows update etc.

At the company I work for, we had to test SP1 for compatibility issues with software before deploying it. And while our current corporate image has SP1 built in, there's still a number of devices that have not been updated to SP1, likely due to the software being used not working right under SP1. There's also the systems that are in closed areas (read: restricted access) that probably have never been updated with ANY patches, upgrades or updates.

There's only so much you can do to try and mitigate the issues. We have divisions that won't migrate to Office 2010 (issues with software such as CATIA), and even groups that can't migrate even to Windows 7 as it breaks the software they use to support functions and programs for customers (commercial and government).

Patched up family PC recently, had outdated Java, Flash, Adobe Reader, and such, but thankfully no viruses or any other infections

and thankfully was running Windows 7 Sp1, so that was good for that machine.

For the average user, Windows 7 is pretty safe if the user uses a bit of common sense. First, remote exploit vulnerabilities does not work for computer that are not exposing the real ip (wifi user for example). Second, other exploits are about to open a malicious file. The solution is to avoid to do that. And the third one is Internet Explorer, using and keeping an updated version of chrome or firefox (and disabling Java) is more than enough.

In my case, i am sticking with windows 7 because windows 7 sp1 is a bit slow.

The big problem now is the fact that a lot of people are still using the RTM version of Windows 7. Anyway, it's a good thing that support ends, keeps the world awake to update.

Studio384 said,
The big problem now is the fact that a lot of people are still using the RTM version of Windows 7. Anyway, it's a good thing that support ends, keeps the world awake to update.

I've long wondered why the Action Center wasn't being used to alert users in extreme situations (RTM support ending and not a single update has been installed, for one). Is the knee-jerk hatred of "phoning home" really so powerful that this would freak people out?

A few days ago this customer called me to help connect her laptop to the wifi because she was going to take it on a trip with them.

Well when I get her connected and remote in I see this..

Vista Service pack 1
Out of date version of
Java
flash
sliverlight
quicktime
adobe reader.

After I installed sp2 she had an additional 85 updates. I just had to patch her up before she went. Then she tells me (at 11:30am) we are leaving on our vacation at 3pm. Well I got the laptop finished at 2:30.

Vista SP1? At that point I back up the persons data and do a fresh install with my Vista SP2 disc, I'm not gonna wait over an hour on the service pack to tell me it fails. Nope.

Computers that are missing SP1 on Windows 7 are the ones with the most difficult viruses/malware to remove. It can be a nightmare.

You have to understand. Grandma's computer is clearly a mission critical production environment and every update needs to be thoroughly tested before her IT department can have it deployed.

Joshie said,
You have to understand. Grandma's computer is clearly a mission critical production environment and every update needs to be thoroughly tested before her IT department can have it deployed.

The grandma argument is old, stale and invalid. I'm talking about the online shopper that's always plugging in their credit card info, the collage kid that's always plugging in his SSN, and the annoying average joe that's always bitching because their computer is "acting stupid". I do IT for a living--I see it and hear it every day.

Tyler R. said,

The grandma argument is old, stale and invalid. I'm talking about the online shopper that's always plugging in their credit card info, the collage kid that's always plugging in his SSN, and the annoying average joe that's always bitching because their computer is "acting stupid". I do IT for a living--I see it and hear it every day.


In all fairness, saying you do IT makes it sound like you're telling stories from an office environment where you could be enforcing these updates yourself.