Microsoft: XP-Vista PC businesses should start Windows 8 planning now

It's a big day for Microsoft as the Windows 8 is officially finished. While the OS is not supposed to be made available for general consumers until October 26th, OEM partners and other businesses will be able to download versions of Windows 8 much earlier.

In a new post on the official Windows Business blog, Microsoft talks about how enterprise customers that are running earlier versions of Windows should evaluate Windows 8. As we have reported a number of times over the past year, Microsoft has been urging the many businesses that are still using Windows XP on their PCs to upgrade to the current version, Windows 7, as soon as possible. Microsoft will end its official support of Windows XP on April 8, 2014.

Microsoft's Erwin Visser writes:

While evaluating Windows 8, we recommend enterprise customers in the process of deploying Windows 7 continue with these deployments. There is great compatibility between Windows 7 and Windows 8, and this will make it easier for customers to start adopting Windows 8 side-by-side with Windows 7. For customers running Windows XP or Windows Vista, and still early in your deployment process, we recommend you start your Windows 8 deployment planning.

IT professionals with Microsoft TechNet subscriptions can download the Windows 8 RTM release on August 15th and businesses that have signed up with Microsoft Software Assurance for can download the Windows 8 Enterprise SKU on August 16th. Businesses without Volume License sign ups will be able to buy Windows 8 through Microsoft Volume License Resellers on September 1st.

Source: Windows Business blog

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36 Comments

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Dot Matrix said,

On a tablet they will be.

If anything they will use a ipad. A metro tablet is the equivalence of a Windows Phone.

The only problem with windows 8 in corporations is that as of right now there is no way to skip the metro start screen. No start button is not a problem but no way to have the machine directly boot into desktop mode is.

I still havent found a group policy setting to do it.

majortom1981 said,
The only problem with windows 8 in corporations is that as of right now there is no way to skip the metro start screen. No start button is not a problem but no way to have the machine directly boot into desktop mode is.

I still havent found a group policy setting to do it.


Pity, the MS refuses to recognize this problem and provide an easy fix, i.e., a choice made during installation "Boot to Metro or Desktop?" [Later, a Registry File element could be changed if the choice made during installation needs to be changed.] Same mechanism should have been made with the Start button. However, we know how corporate arrogance blinds them to the wants and needs of their users.

Businesses should be like our household, skip Windows 8, and move to or stick with Windows 7. I've been playing with Windows 8 for a few months now, and though it's kind of cool, we will be staying with Windows 7 until Windows 9! Windows 7 just works!!!!

JHBrown said,
Businesses should be like our household, skip Windows 8, and move to or stick with Windows 7. I've been playing with Windows 8 for a few months now, and though it's kind of cool, we will be staying with Windows 7 until Windows 9! Windows 7 just works!!!!

Win8 works too. I haven't run into any issues.

Its easy for them to say but who pays for it....or who tells those other companies you run software for to control machines and such that is still even run off of Win98 or even 95 machines cause they don't support a higher OS.

sava700 said,
Its easy for them to say but who pays for it....or who tells those other companies you run software for to control machines and such that is still even run off of Win98 or even 95 machines cause they don't support a higher OS.

VM's. a Win98 VM will run on barely any resources. can be easily setup as a shortcut on a desktop. and Win98 can be set to just boot 1 (or more) apps and almost fit seemlessly into a Win7 desktop using what, 128mb RAM and barely any CPU? (just opting a possibility)

Honestly Microsoft needs to produce a business class OS developed alongside of Windows 8 (Metro).

Business' aren't going to pay for the training to move beyond the classic desktop, in addition, most of Metro's features will never be used in a corporate computing environment. It's overall, a waste of time even considering a real windows 8 deployment.

I know I will get flamed for suggesting a "different" OS, but "Pro" versions need to either distinguish themselves, or stop existing. Just because a computer can join a Domain Controller doesn't make it professional.

Corporate users needs a fast, comfortable, and secure environment to get real work done, not eye candy.

king_of_hearts said,
Honestly Microsoft needs to produce a business class OS developed alongside of Windows 8 (Metro).

Business' aren't going to pay for the training to move beyond the classic desktop, in addition, most of Metro's features will never be used in a corporate computing environment. It's overall, a waste of time even considering a real windows 8 deployment.

I know I will get flamed for suggesting a "different" OS, but "Pro" versions need to either distinguish themselves, or stop existing. Just because a computer can join a Domain Controller doesn't make it professional.

Corporate users needs a fast, comfortable, and secure environment to get real work done, not eye candy.


people really close minded. read up. I've worked at several major companies in holland, and considering the average level of a user. Win8 will be great for them (im quite sure that over a 10% of office workers, if they can. have a higher DPI setting, tiny resolution or a giant screen. Which all wont be needed anymore (or wont destroy the windows themes as much). Also easier to lock it down. If you have web based apps (like many companies) or the posibility to use or port to Metro apps, you have a great advantage. Many companies work with Desktops, laptops, tablets, mini computers (yes allot use WinCE or some even Win7 for tablets) and phones. Currently its all practically a different OS with its added limitations. Make an RT app, and it will run on ALL without a hitch, with a total uniform look, feel and usage.
people dont like changes! they dont like different looking applications, they want what they know and what they're used to. Offcourse its going to be a learning curve, one we should've had a decade or so ago IMHO. But its much more fool proof. You see the same on those iphones, android phones, tablets and stuff. its dumbed down, easy clickable squares. lazy, uniform structure around the whole OS etc.

What if just 1 single OS can do this. Run on all sorta devices, with just 1 version of an application (or webapp). This will be a huge money saver for many companies, who have 'apps' or websites that have to be adjusted to multiple OS's and/or browsers, or force everyone to use iphones/ipads/safari.

Shadowzz said,

people really close minded. read up.

Actually, I think that you mean "people who don't understand how any large IT organization works in the modern world".

king_of_hearts said,
Honestly Microsoft needs to produce a business class OS developed alongside of Windows 8 (Metro).

Business' aren't going to pay for the training to move beyond the classic desktop, in addition, most of Metro's features will never be used in a corporate computing environment. It's overall, a waste of time even considering a real windows 8 deployment.

I know I will get flamed for suggesting a "different" OS, but "Pro" versions need to either distinguish themselves, or stop existing. Just because a computer can join a Domain Controller doesn't make it professional.

Corporate users needs a fast, comfortable, and secure environment to get real work done, not eye candy.

So, 20 years from now, you still think Betty the Secretary will still be pointing and clicking on everything? TIme to start thinking outside the box, man.

Depending on your hardware, maybe Windows-7 might be a more reasonable choice. Buying new touch-screen monitors to fully enjoy Windows-8 is an expense that might better be used for more business-critical needs. Windows-7 will be very "alive and well" until 2020.

TsarNikky said,
Depending on your hardware, maybe Windows-7 might be a more reasonable choice. Buying new touch-screen monitors to fully enjoy Windows-8 is an expense that might better be used for more business-critical needs. Windows-7 will be very "alive and well" until 2020.

actually, i can see a great way for many cooperations, where people just use a few applications, they can be ported to a metro app. Used on desktops, phones and tablets (quite sure next xbox aswell, maybe 360 too, who knows) and used uniform around the work place and at home. Add the benefit of closing down the entire Desktop and Win32API, setup a 'store' on your Win2012 server for any application to install/load from (or just use remote app or something). Easily closing down the entire system like it is NOTHING and more secure with ALLOT less effort then you can get a Win7 environment.
havent gotten a chance to dig through all new GP policies and powershell commands yet. But so far its a great improvement.

Microsoft are right, business should be planning. Unfortunately for them we have already started putting down plans to nest down into Windows 7 and skip Windows 8 for deployment.

We have had IT managers lining up to have their say on this and "no" has been the resounding answer. It basically boils down to not wanting the end-user training costs, not wanting Microsoft accounts floating about and not wanting app stores (yes I know you can these off; it is more a statement of paradigm and a future we aren't 'feeling' than actual features in this release).

From my point of view Microsoft have a lot of work to do to sell this and for industry it means that they have to sell it to people like me and to colleagues, many of whom are not sharing this vision.

Contrary to the view in the above posts, we actually had Windows 7 base deployment avaialble for anyone who wanted it before SP1 was around and had XP almost eradicated not long after SP1 turned up (we still have a couple of lingering boxes to this day mind).

If you are going to be going for broke with Windows 8, that's great! I look forward to reading your write-ups about how it goes for you - but please don't flame me for having my own opinion.

C:Amie said,
Microsoft are right, business should be planning. Unfortunately for them we have already started putting down plans to nest down into Windows 7 and skip Windows 8 for deployment.

We have had IT managers lining up to have their say on this and "no" has been the resounding answer. It basically boils down to not wanting the end-user training costs, not wanting Microsoft accounts floating about and not wanting app stores (yes I know you can these off; it is more a statement of paradigm and a future we aren't 'feeling' than actual features in this release).

From my point of view Microsoft have a lot of work to do to sell this and for industry it means that they have to sell it to people like me and to colleagues, many of whom are not sharing this vision.

Contrary to the view in the above posts, we actually had Windows 7 base deployment avaialble for anyone who wanted it before SP1 was around and had XP almost eradicated not long after SP1 turned up (we still have a couple of lingering boxes to this day mind).

If you are going to be going for broke with Windows 8, that's great! I look forward to reading your write-ups about how it goes for you - but please don't flame me for having my own opinion.


you know AD can act as the microsoft account right?
cooperate clients dont need any connection to MS at all. every single bit of the client will be controlled and passed through servers

Shadowzz said,

you know AD can act as the microsoft account right?
cooperate clients dont need any connection to MS at all. every single bit of the client will be controlled and passed through servers

Maybe you didn't read the rest of the post?

C:Amie said,

If you are going to be going for broke with Windows 8, that's great! I look forward to reading your write-ups about how it goes for you - but please don't flame me for having my own opinion.

I don't know of a single major IT department that hasn't decided to skip Windows 8 entirely.

It's a complete usability nightmare from the end user perspective. And it's the first time MS is releasing an OS that is LESS productive on the desktop, HARDER to grok at a glance, and a huge step BACKWARDS in legacy compatibility. What a mess.

Windows 8 is the New Coke of operating systems.


Our company is considering to start a Win 7 migration now (from XP), to be done by the end of next year. Let's hope this time it's for real...

Odom said,

Our company is considering to start a Win 7 migration now (from XP), to be done by the end of next year. Let's hope this time it's for real...

Very wise move. Let those who enjoy being on the "(b)leeding edge of technology" enjoy Windows-8, and its stabilization period.

abysal said,
"Microsoft will end its official support of Windows XP on April 8, 2014."
For real this time

Will never apply to companies. You can always get an extended maintenance contract. As long as companies pay, they'll support you.

Odom said,

Will never apply to companies. You can always get an extended maintenance contract. As long as companies pay, they'll support you.

What are you talking about? The end of official support in 2014 for XP signals the end of Microsoft releasing *any* kind of updates for it. If critical security bugs are detected, too damn bad. No updates. Certificates breached? XP isn't getting updated revocations. Microsoft will no longer support XP as in they will after that date no longer put out ANY kind of update.

I'm sure some crappy IT company will very happily sell you some nonsense IT support contract for XP, but they don't have the power to patch stuff in the operating system. The April 8th 2014 date frankly really only applies to companies - realistic mainstream consumer support was killed off in 2009 (EIGHT years after the product was first released).

MS Pandya said,

What are you talking about? The end of official support in 2014 for XP signals the end of Microsoft releasing *any* kind of updates for it. If critical security bugs are detected, too damn bad. No updates. Certificates breached? XP isn't getting updated revocations. Microsoft will no longer support XP as in they will after that date no longer put out ANY kind of update.

I'm sure some crappy IT company will very happily sell you some nonsense IT support contract for XP, but they don't have the power to patch stuff in the operating system. The April 8th 2014 date frankly really only applies to companies - realistic mainstream consumer support was killed off in 2009 (EIGHT years after the product was first released).


your silly arent ya. the last Windows 98 update was on 10th of december 2008. Official support should've ended in 2003, extended support to 2006.
WinXP will receive updates if deemed nessesary. Knowing Microsoft, they will not drop the entire support for old software. They will not develop it anymore, improve stability or pretty much anything else. however, they will continue to release security updates as long as the userbase is even still a few %

dont trust me, check here
http://www.msfn.org/board/topi...s-updates-for-windows-98se/
and see HOW MUCH updates they released untill the usage was below 1,5% iirc

Odom said,

Will never apply to companies. You can always get an extended maintenance contract. As long as companies pay, they'll support you.

Who actually calls MS for support anyway?

abysal said,
"Microsoft will end its official support of Windows XP on April 8, 2014."

For real this time


I wouldn't bet the ranch on that one. When one looks at the financial institutions running XP, I can't imagine Microsoft forsaking them. In the unlikely event MS does that, MS can kiss any hope of businesses embracing Windows-8 good bye.

Shadowzz said,

your silly arent ya. the last Windows 98 update was on 10th of december 2008. Official support should've ended in 2003, extended support to 2006.
WinXP will receive updates if deemed nessesary. Knowing Microsoft, they will not drop the entire support for old software. They will not develop it anymore, improve stability or pretty much anything else. however, they will continue to release security updates as long as the userbase is even still a few %

dont trust me, check here
http://www.msfn.org/board/topi...s-updates-for-windows-98se/
and see HOW MUCH updates they released untill the usage was below 1,5% iirc

nah

they would ignore it by apirl '14 , since they already give XP 5 more years of support (it is supposed to expire by nov 2011 which is about two year ago)

too many windows to support in the mean time

XP , Vista ,Win 7 ,Win 8

No business I know would ever jump straight to a brand new release, especially before it's commerically released.
You're talking _at least_ 2 years after RTM

akav0id said,
No business I know would ever jump straight to a brand new release, especially before it's commerically released.
You're talking _at least_ 2 years after RTM

That's true but this article talks about evaluation of Windows 8 rather than going for a quick adoption. If you're in a large company you might start looking at the server offerings and consider getting your tech guys familiar with it.

imachip said,

That's true but this article talks about evaluation of Windows 8 rather than going for a quick adoption. If you're in a large company you might start looking at the server offerings and consider getting your tech guys familiar with it.

windows server 2012 is different. it has features that are a must if you use hyper-v. Windows 8 does not really have any must have features.

Xilo said,
I can see businesses skipping Windows 8 just like they skipped Windows Vista.

+1
half of the enterprise are in 7(most wont upgrade to 8) and many are planning to move to 7 in coming years...
8 would be the new vista

I just released the last version of my software that supports Windows XP and Windows Vista on Sunday. Only supporting Windows 7/8 going forward.

Computers my software is activated on:

Windows 7/2008 R2 - 90%
Windows Vista/2008 - 4%
Windows XP - 6%

It doesn't make sense to keep supporting (especially Vista) since I have to test each release on all supported operating systems. Not worth it anymore.