Microsoft's channel 9 gives a tour of some Microsoft buildings, lots of Windows 2000 nostalgia

Microsoft’s Channel 9 has released its 100th episode of the Defrag Tools series and in this episode, they go on a tour of some of the Microsoft offices. This week’s edition has them visit the offices of Chad Beeder and Andrew Richards, and talk about some of the history of Buildings 22 and 26.

The tour takes in patio views of the main campus, Andrews office, the Microsoft Build Lab’s and has the crew showing off some of the Windows NT 3.1, 4.0 and 2000 plaques and team photos.

If you are a fan of Microsoft, or just interested in some of the history surrounding the company then the video is well worth a watch.

Recently, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella praised the community of Channel 9 for supporting Microsoft's efforts by not only giving developers more detailed information about their products and other services but also taking feedback via their forums and on the "Channel 9 Live" show. Nadella stated, "It is you, the 9ers, who truly make the community a vibrant and dynamic place."

Source: Channel 9

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I remeber Win7 had come out for a year or so and the official Vodafone dealer shops (not their partners), were still using 2K Workstations. I think some Post Office locations around here still do run a dos type program under 2000 or XP, depending on the machine.

I remeber Win7 had come out for a year or so and the official Vodafone dealer shops (not their partners), were still using 2K Workstations. I think some Post Office locations around here still do run a dos type program under 2000 or XP, depending on the machine.

warwagon said,
Windows 2000 is still one of my favorite Microsoft OS. I loved the login screen, so minimal.

Minimal? Secure log on - Ctrl + Alt + Del (although you could disable it). I would say Windows 8 Welcome Screen is the most minimal.

warwagon said,
Windows 2000 is still one of my favorite Microsoft OS. I loved the login screen, so minimal.

Well, it was great because it paved the way for the NT based kernel coming to the mainstream desktop and was the first real chance to move away from Windows 98. Obviously XP improved on that and became the first 'home' NT kernel based version of Windows, but Windows 2000 did really feel properly next generation compared to Windows NT4 or Windows 98 :)

Perhaps they could commemorate Windows 2000 by reinstating some of its features in more modern versions of Windows?

Ian William said,
Perhaps they could commemorate Windows 2000 by reinstating some of its features in more modern versions of Windows?

Yeah, not sure what they would include. Win2K was a pretty bare bones OS, and it's features have since been superseded.

Skwerl said,
What's been left out? Old icons are the only things that I can think of. :(

Isnt that the only thing left? Old icons? ;)

HTML folder templates maybe. (Meh.) Oh that and the "vomit icons everywhere" appearance that was prevalent in those old versions of Explorer, glad to see that one fixed/gone. Other than that, can't think of anything that any of the current versions are lacking that 2K had. Aside from frequent blue screens that is.

Dot Matrix said,

Yeah, not sure what they would include. Win2K was a pretty bare bones OS, and it's features have since been superseded.

Barebones OS?

USB support, DirectX support, stability of the NT Kernel, drop shadow below menus and mouse pointers, personalized menus, self healing applications, nicer ad/remove programs, ACL, CD Player, Windows Installer, improved setup and deployment experience. Windows 2000 was the Windows 7 of 2000.

Mr. Dee said,

Barebones OS?

USB support, DirectX support, stability of the NT Kernel, drop shadow below menus and mouse pointers, personalized menus, self healing applications, nicer ad/remove programs, ACL, CD Player, Windows Installer, improved setup and deployment experience. Windows 2000 was the Windows 7 of 2000.

Aside from the menus, where do you not have that in Windows 8?

Mr. Dee said,

Barebones OS?

USB support, DirectX support, stability of the NT Kernel, drop shadow below menus and mouse pointers, personalized menus, self healing applications, nicer ad/remove programs, ACL, CD Player, Windows Installer, improved setup and deployment experience. Windows 2000 was the Windows 7 of 2000.

Besides, I think you misunderstood me when I said "barebones". Win2K didn't feature upgrades or the sort. You installed it, and ran.

But many of the features in Win2k have since been replaced and superseded (in the case CD Player, Windows Installer, etc.) or deprecated and removed (menus).

Dot Matrix said,

Besides, I think you misunderstood me when I said "barebones". Win2K didn't feature upgrades or the sort. You installed it, and ran.

But many of the features in Win2k have since been replaced and superseded (in the case CD Player, Windows Installer, etc.) or deprecated and removed (menus).

I don't know what you mean by installed it and ran? I upgraded to it from Windows 98 SE, it was initially FAT32 by I used the convert command through Command prompt to move to NTFS. Also, in place upgrades were naturally smooth when upgrading from NT 4 Workstation.

Windows 2000 did include Media Player, drop shadow menus are still in Windows apps such as Wordpad and you can still find the shadow under mouse pointer in Windows 7. Windows Installer 5 is in Windows 7 and 8.