Microsoft's HTML5 showcase continues with Contre Jour

Microsoft has been working hard over the past few months to showcase the true power behind HTML5. We have seen everything from an interactive music video to the Atari Arcade. Clearly, Microsoft is a big believer in HTML 5 and here we are again as Microsoft is pushing the envelope by showcasing how Contre Jour can be run using the platform.

Clarity worked with Microsoft and Mokus (the creators of Contre Jour) to bring Petit to life in HTML5 and Javascript. The end result is the game that has previously been locked to the app world being delivered in the browser. 

While Microsoft has previously shown the power of HTML5 with many different demos, this particular demo highlights the touch experience. Rather than a single point of input, the game can work with multiple contact points (multi-touch) to bring the native experience of Contre Jour, directly to the browser.

You can read all about the behind the scenes details here or watch the video below.

Microsoft has been throwing its massive weight behind the platform as it recognizes that HTML5 is the future of web development and it wants to lead the industry down that path. Contre Jour requires a "modern browser" and naturally Microsoft highlights IE10, which, ironically, 99% of the consumer base does not have access too. 

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Intel's McAfee to lay off employees

Next Story

Windows Phone 8 getting a London launch as well

18 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

eddman said,

Turn off tracking protection for game's website.


Ah ha, thank you!
That's funny - does ie10 have the same issue with Tracking Protection enabled!?

cleverclogs said,

Ah ha, thank you!
That's funny - does ie10 have the same issue with Tracking Protection enabled!?

You're welcome. Yeah, it is funny. There I was repeatedly clicking play and the game just refused to run. Then I saw the blue tracking icon in the top right side and thought "hey, that's not right. What's it blocking?". Disabled it and problem solved.

Maybe it depends on what protection list one is using. I'm using EasyPrivacy and Fanboy lists.
Don't have windows 8 to test IE10.

cool game but it's really dark and sullen. i perfer bright and happy games like angry birds (not that angry birds is that awesome...)

meanwhile most new development is app based and FB just quit HTML5 completely and went native.

HTML5 is ok for sites. for apps, it is more pain than it is worth and it does nothing better than native development.

it's the lowest commond denominator and it shows.

Sas Center said,
i just don't understand how websites like facebook fail on html5, while games like this are built and work well.

Incompetence?

neonspark said,
meanwhile most new development is app based and FB just quit HTML5 completely and went native.

HTML5 is ok for sites. for apps, it is more pain than it is worth and it does nothing better than native development.

it's the lowest commond denominator and it shows.

That's what we're judging new web technologies by, facebook? Might have a lot of users, but it's still not much of a site. Anyways, just because facebook dumped html5 doesn't necessarily mean anything, anybody can need something not in html5 doesn't mean html5 is bad. I'm not a web developer, but it's gotta be better than html4, no?

neonspark said,

HTML5 is ok for sites. for apps, it is more pain than it is worth and it does nothing better than native development.

1) We are still recovering from Apple's insane push for Apps that went from 'Applications' to optimized ways to 'browse' websites. (Look at any leading website, they have an App, and considering they don't offer anymore functionality than even Safari can handle, why?)

2) Until Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, etc change their model of how to deal with HTML5 content, it will continue to suffer. The main reason IE9/10 STILL outperforms ALL of these browsers in graphics intense HTML5 demonstrations is because they abandoned the Document Viewer concept for a browser, and moved forward to be a compile and run model. Until the other browser treat content like 'code' and shoves it through a runtime library instead of a document viewer model, their performance will keep HTML5 inaccessible for users on Tablets and lower end hardware.

3) As hinted in #2, it is about performance, and how to get performance out of HTML5. IE is doing this and in a way that on WP7/8, Windows RT, and Windows 8 on anything ALL run very complex HTML5 sites at reasonable FPS.

One way to showcase a WP7 device to friends is to have them load a few HTML5 sites on their iPad 2, or iPhone 4S, or Quad Core Android device, or even their netbook and notebook.

And then load the same sties side by side on WP7 which in the 1st generation has far LESS HARDWARE. Let them see for themselves the WP7 devcie running rich HTML5 graphical content at 20-30fps, and seeing 1-2fps on Android and maybe 10-15fps on iOS and 1-10fps on Chrome or Firefox on a low end notebook/netbook.

Chrome, Safari, Firefox, etc have trouble on low end systems when dealing with HTML5. Even on mid to high end systems, they get into problems as well, which is why Google's 'response' to IE9's Fish was a WebGL site. (Which is NOT HTML5, is not secure, and is NOT a standard.)

So HTML5 has growing pains, and people not pushing Google, Apple, etc to redesign their browser to 'run' web content instead of 'display' content like a document, HTML5 will never do well, especially when you have tablets and phones.


4) HTML5 vs Native App development. True there aren't direct advantages in build only an App. However, if you are developing a Web Site and would like to make it a pay for App or expand its functionality moving it to an App on Windows 8 frameworks is effortless and you can continue to develop in HTML5 and javascript.

This is the main advantage, is the portability. Which ironically Microsoft is the ONLY major player that is embracing STANDARDS and even allowing HTML5 content to run near native on Windows 8. (The IE10 engine is a compile and run model, so it is treating HTML5 content even at the basic level, like code and running it. This same engine is a framework available alongside the WinRT framework on Windows 8.)


5) There is one other aspect of HTML5 that nobody talks about. HTML5 is as much about new development paradigms as it is rich functionality. Using the MVVM that came out of Microsoft and is popular in WPF and Silverlight, HTML5 can carry forward the new development concepts and implement them. This is where programming moves from coder to designer, and is at the heart of Expression Blend where a Graphic Designer can literally draw and create a full App without writing a line of code. HTML5 is not as rich as WPF or Silverlight, but it can be, and will be.

This promotes the newer development concepts and makes them available to Web Site and App developers that would normally never learn or touch anything from Microsoft. It is also Microsoft's way of throwing the MVVM and other concepts out for EVERYONE not just Windows developers.