Microsoft's next Patch Tuesday to include critical IE and Windows 7 updates

Every second Tuesday of the month, Microsoft releases a number of security software updates. This upcoming Tuesday will be no exception and today, the company posted its summary of its security patch that will be released on April 9th, also known as Patch Tuesday.

Nine security bulletins will be issued on that day, and two of them will be labeled as "Critical". The summary of the security announcements reveals that one of the critical bulletins concerns Internet Explorer and it affects IE6, 7, and 8 in Windows XP, IE7, 8 and 9 in Windows Vista, IE8, 9 and 10 in Windows 7 and IE10 in Windows 8 and RT.

The other critical update to be released on Tuesday is for Windows XP Service Pack 3, along with Windows Vista Service Pack 2, and Windows 7. This critical update does not affect Windows 8 or RT. As usual, Microsoft has not gone into detail on the specifics behind these updates so as to not alert hackers beforehand but will release that information after the patches are launched on Tuesday.

Microsoft will almost certainly issue non-security related software updates for other products on Tuesday, such as software fixes and improvements for its Surface RT and Surface Pro PCs.

Source: Microsoft Security page

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12 Comments

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Patch Tuesday = always critical security vulnerabilities... Where's that MS' funded company that was saying "the most secure browser" ? heh

Meanwhile IE still does not receive new features as all other browsers; which potentially create more security issues. It's simply rubbish code.

Though I believe here none is using IE anyway.

What features mate?
Chrome and Fx don't come with a build in adblocker, IE does.
Whats more to need on the internetwebs...hmmm... not much really.
Oh and IE addons have been completely sandboxed since..forever. Even IE6 addons will often work in IE9+. So if you think addons in IE give a bigger security issue then addons in Chrome or Firefox, then you are highly mistaken my friend. And just talking out of your arse.

And if you think IE is rubbish code, why is it currently the only browser that actively compiles and runs the websites similar to a .exe program. The only browser that properly utilizes GPU acceleration (unlike Fx/Chrome and their webGL mumbojumbo).

Oh and btw, yes Chrome and Firefox are the leaders of found bugs and exploits.
Just imagine how much of those hackers/crackers are black hats and thus never report their findings.

Just a few fun facts
IE8 came with a new sandboxing. The first to break through this sandboxing and was able to access the system directly. Was 1,5years after IE8 was released. IE8 might suck as a browser, but it was the most secure for a long period of time.
IE9, it took people 7 months to break through its sandboxing.
IE10 has not been broken yet. So that's 7 months and counting? (The flash exploit in the beginning did not break through the sandboxing)

But please, show me an example of Chrome or Firefox being unhackable for long periods of time, cause I am unaware.
Remember Google's half-assed job on attempting sandboxing? It was broken on sight lol.

Edited by ShadowMajestic, Apr 5 2013, 4:36pm :

Shadowzz said,
Always fun to see there's still quite some IE6 code left in IE10.

Yea, keeping what works and throwing out what doesn't is considered an intelligent strategy.

Shadowzz said,
Always fun to see there's still quite some IE6 code left in IE10.

Probably part of the compatibility view code.

Shadowzz said,
Always fun to see there's still quite some IE6 code left in IE10.

Yeah, and how much Windows 95 code is still in Windows 8?
Well I can't say there is for sure, but there's definitely an awful lot in Windows 7, and I doubt it was removed for Windows 8.

J_R_G said,

Yea, keeping what works and throwing out what doesn't is considered an intelligent strategy.


Yeah but I figured that they must've rewritten most of it.
Its just as interesting that even today exploits are found in IE6. You would've thought they would've been found by now

It's because there is no end to IE6's awfulness (and that's coming from someone who thinks IE9 & 10 are pretty darn nice).

Shadowzz said,

Yeah but I figured that they must've rewritten most of it.
Its just as interesting that even today exploits are found in IE6. You would've thought they would've been found by now

They might have been found for many years. Doesn't mean they were disclosed to Microsoft or public security boards
It's only with white-hat hackers that we get to know about security issues. There are a lot of black-hat hackers who'll save up a lot of holes they find and sell them on the black-market.

Never thought IE6 was that bad. Now IE7 is totally another story. I don't know how many times that thing crashed the very first time it was opened, on computers I worked on.

Bring on the patches!!

sagum said,

They might have been found for many years. Doesn't mean they were disclosed to Microsoft or public security boards
It's only with white-hat hackers that we get to know about security issues. There are a lot of black-hat hackers who'll save up a lot of holes they find and sell them on the black-market.


I am aware, and MS has its own security teams that actively hunt for these things in their own software too. Even others. (they where the biggest bug reporter for Chrome for a while).
But its still surprising