Microsoft's secret 128 page illustrated book for new Nokia employees revealed

Microsoft acquired Nokia's smartphone division a few weeks ago, and with that move it also added 25,000 new employees to its work force. Today, a new report reveals Microsoft gave all those new team members a very cool, and until now secret, gift in the form of a 128 page book titled simply "One".

The Verge reports that Microsoft and Nokia got UK-based TCOLondon to create the book, which was designed to show all those new employees that the two companies actually share a history of technological innovation. Beyond that, the book itself is beautiful, with the article showing that TCOLondon spared no expense in making a product with some impressive production values and illustrations. In other word, this publication was not some dull worker's manual but a true celebration of Nokia and Microsoft's histories.

There's no word on just how much money was budgeted for the production of the book, but since it has a limited print run, we can imagine that it's already a collector's item. Indeed, The Verge's report claims Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella gave a copy of the book to Finland president, Sauli Niinisto, during a recent visit to that country.

Source: The Verge | Image via The Verge

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15 Comments

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This is actually a very nice gesture to staff who may have felt threatened at being absorbed into the world's largest software company.
They are saying welcome. You're like us and we're like you.

I think its one of the best change initiatives I've seen for an acquisition.

You obviously havent been working for any large multinational company. The bigger (richer / stronger / etc.) company buying the smaller, will swallow it, and rules will be coming from the buyer, not the bought one. Usually the employees are transferred to the bigger company for a fix amount of time as agreeded ( 1 year most cases), after that usually the bigger company fire some / most of the employees, as the buying of the smaller company generates lot of duplicated positions.

soder said,
You obviously havent been working for any large multinational company. The bigger (richer / stronger / etc.) company buying the smaller, will swallow it, and rules will be coming from the buyer, not the bought one. Usually the employees are transferred to the bigger company for a fix amount of time as agreeded ( 1 year most cases), after that usually the bigger company fire some / most of the employees, as the buying of the smaller company generates lot of duplicated positions.

I don't know. Microsoft was far too lax when they bought Skype. I don't even know if they have straightened those folks out yet, because the desktop app still sucks.

Amen. Just opening anything Skype related feels like an acid trip.
Just need a leprechaun to come out of the rainbows and flowers!

Secret != limited print run.
If this was secret, it wouldn't have been posted, but nevermind eh john?

Another case of the unprofessional journalism not looking better. It's a clickbait title that was copy-pasted, nothing more.
Shame there isn't a PDF of that book though. Looks nice.

Thief000 said,
Another case of the unprofessional journalism not looking better. It's a clickbait title that was copy-pasted, nothing more.
Shame there isn't a PDF of that book though. Looks nice.
68k said,
Fixed.
You guys are hecka stupid lol.

If this were 1995 and Gates decided to buy Nokia, I can guarantee printing a book like this would be the LAST thing on his mind. Are you sure someone hasn't got the message mixed up: that this was a book actually targeted at primary school children?