Microsoft's Socl social network getting a facelift

Over a year ago, it was revealed that Microsoft was working on its own social network, geared for college students, with the code name Tulip. In December 2011, Microsoft officially announced the network, with the name Socl, and allowed a limited number of students at a few colleges in the US to sign up.

In May, Microsoft allowed anyone to check out the Socl network. Today, the Microsoft Research Fuse Labs blog revealed that Socl is getting some major new features as part of an overall facelift for the network.

The blog states that as far as news posts on Socl:

Viewing the rapid feed on Socl is faster and, well, just better. The home screen is all about the beautiful posts you create (often in just seconds, using the new post creator!). You can choose to see the posts two-columned or three, so it’s less likely you’ll miss out on anything. And now you can see the posts even if you are not signed in or are new to Socl.

All members of Socl now have an updated profile page which shows a person's information, posts, interests and more on just one page. You can also create a page with your favorite playlists on the network along with the ability to watch videos with other Socl friends.

So far, Microsoft has not given any indication of how many people have signed up to use Socl since its beta launch a year ago.

Source: Fuse Labs | Image via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft hands out $325,000 to student entrepreneurs

Next Story

Yet another big update for RetroUI for Windows 8

12 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Awesome social network, use it more then Facebook, easy, since I don't use Facebook, anyway, awesome! Like the new look.

Nazmus Shakib Khandaker said,

Yup! First person I followed was Cheri. She is apparently the community manager...I think.

Well, that must mean they have at least two members.

Tyler R. said,
Microsoft has a social network?!?

For a long time, really, even just as Windows Live. The People hub in Windows 8 reminds me a lot of the old Live social experience: it would integrate data from other social networks you'd link it to (Facebook et al) while allowing local posts, friends, statuses, and image hosting.

I think AIM did something similar, and that sort of instant messaging service-based social network was common place (Yahoo followed suit). From a purely functional perspective, they all did everything most people used Facebook for, but none of them ever got anywhere near Facebook's level of traffic.

TBH, I think a study of this phenomenon would make for a really interesting article. Hopefully it doesn't all simply boil down to the hive mind and using what everyone else is using.

Joshie said,

For a long time, really, even just as Windows Live. The People hub in Windows 8 reminds me a lot of the old Live social experience: it would integrate data from other social networks you'd link it to (Facebook et al) while allowing local posts, friends, statuses, and image hosting.

I think AIM did something similar, and that sort of instant messaging service-based social network was common place (Yahoo followed suit). From a purely functional perspective, they all did everything most people used Facebook for, but none of them ever got anywhere near Facebook's level of traffic.

TBH, I think a study of this phenomenon would make for a really interesting article. Hopefully it doesn't all simply boil down to the hive mind and using what everyone else is using.

Maybe Microsoft has used all of these services as research and finally put them to work on the People Hub for Windows RT/WP8?