More on Windows 8 and IE 10 Metro revealed

If you are a fan of Internet Explorer 10 in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, you have had a busy day. A few hours ago, the official Internet Explorer developer blog posted an update on the new memory protection features in IE 10. Now the official Windows 8 developer blog has also issued a new update, and this time it's all about the Metro web browsing experience in IE 10.

The blog post, written by Microsoft's Rob Mauceri, goes over several aspects of the Metro user interface as it pertains to IE 10. He states:

The Metro style browser delivers on touch browsing, not just browsing on a touch device. You can feel it in the stick-to-your-finger responsiveness of the touch support for panning and zooming, swiping back and forward for page navigation, and double tapping to zoom in and out of content. Context menus and form controls are optimized for touch, and the browser responds fluidly to device orientation (scaling smoothly to landscape and portrait screen layouts) and “snapping” Windows 8 applications next to it.

Mauceri points out a number of features in the Metro version of IE 10. One is the navigation tiles that are a more graphical representation of your frequently visited web sites. The tiles can also be pinned to show the ones that have been placed on Windows 8's Start screen in the Metro version of bookmarks. If a person searches for a web site in the search bar, the tiles are filtered to show you the best search results based on your web surfing history, web site favorites and more.

The new IE10 Metro tabs interface show up on top of the screen in Windows 8 with the last 10 tabs used and can be cleaned up fast with just one command. The IE 10 navigation bar in Metro appears on the bottom of the screen and only when a user needs it.  It has the traditional commands you see in other web browsers such as back, forward, and refresh. It can also be used to pin favorite web sites on Windows 8's Start screen.

New Metro IE 10 features include Snap, which re-sizes the web browser window in order for the user to access other apps such as email, messaging and more. The Charms user interface design is on the right side of the screen and has Windows 8's Start button along with Search, Share, Settings and other features.

Pinning web sites to the Start screen should be one of the most used features for IE 10 owners. Mauceri states:

The tiles for pinned sites reflect the site's color and icon. With IE10, sites can provide background notifications for new messages and other account activity on the website. The site can also program additional commands that appear in IE’s navigation bar in a touch-friendly way, the same way that sites can program jumplists for IE on the desktop.

IE 10 on Windows 8 is also supposed to be safer to use with Mauceri stating that it adds to a number of safety features that were introduced in IE 9, including SmartScreen, XSS filtering, Application Reputation, InPrivate browsing and more. He adds:

IE10 takes advantage of Windows 8 to provide “Enhanced Protected mode” for better isolation of website content in each tab. InPrivate browsing is also extended to run per-tab, so you can run some pages InPrivate, leaving no history, cookies, or cached data.

Image via Microsoft

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I think Metro interface is a toy for a baby or a dog to touch.
I can't imagine why Micro$oft promotes it as improvement.
It is absolutely an insult on professional people.

ray_bk said,
...

You used the dollar sign in the word Microsoft, and yet imply that you are a professional... :\

Besides, if you don't like Metro, don't use it.

Fish said,
if you don't like Metro, don't use it.

People continue to suggest that. But doesn't MS consider Metro apps their future? So basically if you're interested in recent apps you'll soon have no choice but to use Metro if you want to stay with Windows?! If you want to use Microsoft's PDF reader you already have no choice but to use the Metro version since they didn't even build one for the desktop.

CJEric said,

People continue to suggest that. But doesn't MS consider Metro apps their future? So basically if you're interested in recent apps you'll soon have no choice but to use Metro if you want to stay with Windows?

That's what they say... but in the end, the consumers will decide. And I predict a huge flop for the Metro interface

I find Metro IE very fun. You can hover the mouse up top and drag it on a virtual screen and then place your desktop somewhere. It's pretty cool and fun. I was a hater of Metro before but it's grown on me.

First time i opened Metro IE10 i was like wtf, like someone zoomed by windows phone screen. So after saying wtf i went in there and removed the **** from Metro. Just saying

So is there any particular reason why those pinned website blocks have to be so big? I swear it's like Microsoft designed the whole thing with mentally retarded people who are visually impaired at the same time in mind.

.Neo said,
So is there any particular reason why those pinned website blocks have to be so big? I swear it's like Microsoft designed the whole thing with mentally retarded people who are visually impaired at the same time in mind.


Wow that's offensive.
Thank you for being so rude and abrasive.

And so what if those individuals you mentioned were considered as a part of the design?
Are you saying MS should make a separate OS for them?

Choose your words more carefully this time.

(BTW the Metro Zoom tool is EXCELLENT for those with vision problems).

dotf said,
And so what if those individuals you mentioned were considered as a part of the design?
Are you saying MS should make a separate OS for them?

Apparently you never heard of a thing called Universal Access settings.

Didn't mean any disrespect, however the whole thing wastes away screen estate like crazy. You're not going to convince me the average computer user needs a 200 x 600 pixel (or whatever) bright colored block to represent a single website.

Edited by .Neo, Mar 14 2012, 3:59pm :

dotf said,


Wow that's offensive.
Thank you for being so rude and abrasive.

And so what if those individuals you mentioned were considered as a part of the design?
Are you saying MS should make a separate OS for them?

Choose your words more carefully this time.

(BTW the Metro Zoom tool is EXCELLENT for those with vision problems).

No it is not offensive. I could say that is having huge blocks also offensive you know! Just saying.

dotf said,

a man with giant sausage fingers on a small tablet will appreciate it.

Yeah except Windows 8 is also supposed to run on desktops and notebooks...

One thing that I don't like about IE10 Metro, and I don't know if it's a bug in the CP, but if I'm on Bing (the Betta fish version) and simply click anywhere on the page, the whole Bing page turns blank and there's no way to go back to Bing. I have to close IE10 Metro and then click on the Bing tile to open the page again, otherwise if I click on the IE10 Metro tile it opens to the blank page.

Aside from that, IE10 Metro is a cool version of the browser.

>It took me a while to figure where to find any windows/tabs I had opened in the Metro IE.

Right-clicking also works.

He said the magic word, "touch"... I supporting adding the dictionary definition of "touch" to include "screw you, desktop users"

Zagadka said,
He said the magic word, "touch"... I supporting adding the dictionary definition of "touch" to include "screw you, desktop users"

Right click works, I use it often.
Love Metro browser, just need websites that rely on users browser to just give it up and build full screen content.

Shane Ekanayake said,
waiting for firefox and Chrome metro browsers

Same look/feel (because that's metro), different rendering engine.
It will be nice to see Chrome finally using DirectWrite fonts.

dotf said,

Same look/feel (because that's metro), different rendering engine.
It will be nice to see Chrome finally using DirectWrite fonts.

im fine with metro look and feel
but i dont like how IE used it

Good if anyone finds it useful , it's built for non-tech savvy people, I hope Microsoft doesn't dumb down the desktop IE to that level too.

xpclient said,
Good if anyone finds it useful , it's built for non-tech savvy people, I hope Microsoft doesn't dumb down the desktop IE to that level too.

could imagine them just removing the desktop variant in the next windows (WMP,IE....etc)

they gonna tell you it is redundant haha

after that they would say "oh look explorer tile useage is low, let use our right to remove metro applet to disable desktop tile " !!!

It took me a while to figure where to find any windows/tabs I had opened in the Metro IE. Clicking the address bar to bring them up wasn't very obvious at all though it might be a good way to do it once you learn the functionality. MS is really trying their luck by bringing in new concepts without giving any hint how they might work.

I'm sorry, but am I the only one who thinks Metro was designed entirely in MS Paint? :\ It looks absolutely horrible. :\

I get that Microsoft are trying to replicate the simplicity of iOS, but that doesn't mean draw a few squares and circles and then let rip with the Paint Bucket tool. :\

Everyone keeps saying how wonderful it is and makes me think one of us must be taking crazy pills. I'm kinda praying for a "haha gotcha!" from MS and then they introduce a brilliant new interface. :\

Pc_Madness said,
I the only one who thinks Metro was designed entirely in MS Paint?

No, but you're all wrong.
Metro was designed after more than a decade of human computer interaction study.
If your comments had 10 years of thought behind them instead of kneejerk reaction basis, maybe just maybe I'd be inclined to agree with you.

Pc_Madness said,
I'm sorry, but am I the only one who thinks Metro was designed entirely in MS Paint? :\ It looks absolutely horrible. :\

I get that Microsoft are trying to replicate the simplicity of iOS, but that doesn't mean draw a few squares and circles and then let rip with the Paint Bucket tool. :\

Everyone keeps saying how wonderful it is and makes me think one of us must be taking crazy pills. I'm kinda praying for a "haha gotcha!" from MS and then they introduce a brilliant new interface. :\

Metro goes back over 100 years of what works for human readability, and is why magazines and newspapers essentially follow the same rules and have for long time.

Microsoft started a project in the early 80s, that was a part of Windows 1.0, but tiny in scale, that was about making computers easily usable and 'readable', and this is why even Windows 1.0 had some Metro concepts as they could be implemented, with low resolution graphics.

The Microsoft usability studies moved on in the 80s and 90s (Even Word and Excel that made the Mac business capable, used these usability and design concepts, and standardized and changed aspects that affect ALL GUIs today, from Linux to OS X. (Select and modify, flow, and a lot things we just assume were always around or somehow conflate coming from Xerox or Apple.)

In the 1990s they did a lot of research studies, and out of this a few products were released that look very much like Metro does today. Go find screen-shots of MS Encrata or MS Streets from the mid 90s. People didn't complain about them then, in fact they were applauded for usability and readability.

The Metro design focuses on standard rule of thirds, whitespace, typography rules, and a ton of other things that graphic designer and layout artists can recite or just know.

If you look at IE4 back in 1998, and hit the Full-Screen mode it offered for browsing, you will find it looks a LOT like the IE10 Metro in Windows 8. This stuff has been around and used. (IE 5,6,7,8,9 all also do the Metro style full screen mode, just hit Alt-Enter or the Fullscreen option from the menu.)

So after more money than most people will ever see, the concepts of readibility and combining what the printing world knew with computer technology of usability, Microsoft has been slipping in pieces of this on going research into products for the last 15 years.

Notice in Vista/Win7 that the Menu Bars are gone unless you hit the Alt key? This is moving to Metro, as Menus are non-Graphical UI metaphors that are text based word lists, that other GUI 'leaders' like Apple doesn't seem to realize.

So now Microsoft is going full in, and moving faster than what people would like, but it is time to put on our big girl panties and adapt. Metro is easier to read, easier to find information, easier to use and it applies not matter if it is a phone, desktop or a tablet.

WP7 has shown that the UI model can be efficient, and effective. WP7 may not be the biggest seller,but it gets the 'design' 'ease of use' awards, and it also gets the highest customer satisfaction ratings, that even beat the amazing iPhone.

WP7 and Metro concepts of 'integration' is why they can do the "$100 if your phone can beat Windows Phone" that started at CES and is still going on around the world.

(Think Metro is ugly and stupid, go find one of the $100 events, and see if you can find things, do things, or navigate your phone faster than WP7. Heck even take it up a notch, and see if you can do beat WP7 with your computer in the same tasks. Your computer will lose too.)

Just like WP7, users will find they can do things faster and find and see information faster with Metro on Windows 8.

Having the option to pin sites is great, but people save URLs that they may or may not want to view at a later date--it's not just for sites that they frequent. With no favorites list, the metro user will have no choice but to fill the start page with potentially useless tiles instead of simply using a list that lives inside IE. Beyond that, there are some pretty good features so far.

I find it pretty bad that you can't pin (bookmark) a site without it being pinned on the home screen. As said above, having 50+ sites on your home screen is going to be pretty naff.

Also once again, things are so un-obvious that most people couldn't even find the pinned sites from the browser.

Mazhar said,
Here we go. Improvement in Windows 8 starts. Where are haters?

If there is room for improvement then I expect there is room for 'hate' of what needs improving.

lt8480 said,

The emoticons need metro-ing like on WP7

There are literally HUNDREDS of Metro emoticons in Windows 8. However, you need the touch keyboard to see them - they don't show up on the standard onscreen keyboard :[

IE 10 in its metro form is simply non usable for me. Good effort by Microsoft PR in trying to demonstrate useless features.

sanke1 said,
IE 10 in its metro form is simply non usable for me. Good effort by Microsoft PR in trying to demonstrate useless features.

Well it was pretty good when I tried it in the consumer preview, but there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of settings, couldn't even find a way to change default search engine so yea...

Leonick said,

Well it was pretty good when I tried it in the consumer preview, but there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of settings, couldn't even find a way to change default search engine so yea...

There are no IE specific settings when you access Settings from the charm bar?

The Charm bar is context sensitive to whatever Metro app you're running.

Why has Metro IE have no add-ons support? I get why they don't want to support plugins but Firefox is popular because of its add-ons so its not a radical idea to include add-on support

thealexweb said,
Why has Metro IE have no add-ons support? I get why they don't want to support plugins but Firefox is popular because of its add-ons so its not a radical idea to include add-on support

Because of security. Add-ons have to access OS/system level parts that open it up, no add-ons in Metro (still there on the desktop) lowers the target size. Something that's pretty important when we're talking mobile devices like tablets which people look at as less of a PC and more of a individual device itself.

Performance is another key I'm sure, so that probably played into it. Still, how do we know metro FF will support plugins?

GP007 said,

Because of security. Add-ons have to access OS/system level parts that open it up, no add-ons in Metro (still there on the desktop) lowers the target size. Something that's pretty important when we're talking mobile devices like tablets which people look at as less of a PC and more of a individual device itself.

Performance is another key I'm sure, so that probably played into it. Still, how do we know metro FF will support plugins?

not even extensions?(u know different things)

Ci7 said,

not even extensions?(u know different things)

Extensions, add-ons, plug-ins, they're all the same thing with different names. It's all code running on the side of the browser that needs access to the OS in some form to do what it does. Like a ff extension that lets you save youtube videos or w/e. It's just another security target when you open up the sandbox to that sort of stuff.

Besides, Not everyone is extension/add-on crazy, the only thing I have is flash and SL on my system. People who use lots are in the minority, and if you really want all that then just use the desktop version (which you'll be using anyways because most of those same people are raging at Metro anyways).

GP007 said,

Extensions, add-ons, plug-ins, they're all the same thing with different names. It's all code running on the side of the browser that needs access to the OS in some form to do what it does. Like a ff extension that lets you save youtube videos or w/e. It's just another security target when you open up the sandbox to that sort of stuff.

Besides, Not everyone is extension/add-on crazy, the only thing I have is flash and SL on my system. People who use lots are in the minority, and if you really want all that then just use the desktop version (which you'll be using anyways because most of those same people are raging at Metro anyways).

understandable.

Thanks

through hardly use that much

had Flash installed for 'just in case' + ADP (for those Ad infested sites ,green listed Neowin )

i believe by not supporting extension , they would actually drive us to use metro apps more at least we are safer

thealexweb said,
Why has Metro IE have no add-ons support? I get why they don't want to support plugins but Firefox is popular because of its add-ons so its not a radical idea to include add-on support

Yes let us support Adobe Flash and Java plugins, while at it lets throw in Real Player.

_Heracles said,

Yes let us support Adobe Flash and Java plugins, while at it lets throw in Real Player.

REALPLAYER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

_Heracles said,

Yes let us support Adobe Flash and Java plugins, while at it lets throw in Real Player.

I made it quite clear that I understand their decision to scrap plugin support, be gone troll. My question was only about the lack of add-on support.

thealexweb said,

I made it quite clear that I understand their decision to scrap plugin support, be gone troll. My question was only about the lack of add-on support.

plugins are things like realplayer, flash, and adobe reader...

addons are things like adblock plus, screen capture elite, stylish, imgur,showip, etc...

remixedcat said,

plugins are things like realplayer, flash, and adobe reader...

addons are things like adblock plus, screen capture elite, stylish, imgur,showip, etc...

I know that -.^

im not a fan of how the bookmarks work. my mother loves using them and has around 50 saved.. with this interface it just doesnt work out well. for me its not so much a problem because i dont use them but i can see it being a problem for others

but then again thats why we have choice of other browsers or the desktop version of IE

Only thing I can think of while looking at this interface is that it is the baby internet.

I think I'd much prefer using my big boy browser.

Vice said,
Only thing I can think of while looking at this interface is that it is the baby internet.

I think I'd much prefer using my big boy browser.


bravo

Vice said,
Only thing I can think of while looking at this interface is that it is the baby internet.

I think I'd much prefer using my big boy browser.

hehe

Although i don't know what you mean by "baby internet", you did make me chuckle!