Morrowind Overhaul 3.0: A monument to modding

Even though it’s 10 years old now, The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind is one of those things that just gets better and better with age. Out of the box, it’s as good a game as it was the day it was released, but now you can improve it even more, thanks to the monument to PC gaming modding that is Morrowind Overhaul 3.0.

The enterprising modders over at Ornitocopter have taken it into their own hands to bring this gaming classic up to speed with the modern world, giving it a much needed graphical overhaul that lets it stand beside, if not quite demolish, the likes of Skyrim and Oblivion. It's the biggest, baddest edition of one of the best mods we've ever seen, and it's easier to use than ever before. Would you believe that this amazing mod was all convieniently tucked away in a hassle free installer? Yeah, it is.

Alright, so it’s a little hard to describe the graphical improvements to be had here, so we’ll just share a few screenshots with you. But the bottom line is that this package highlights everything that’s great about PC gaming – the customization, and the community spirit that drives it along. How many console games still have an active community playing them after 10 years, let alone improving them? That’s right: none! And needless to say, if you haven't played Morrowind, go get it. Now.

Source: Ornitocopter | Via PC Gamer

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13 Comments

How many console games still have an active community playing them after 10 years, let alone improving them? That's right: none!

This isn't a very fair comment. For all intents and purposes, the entire console emulation community is a better answer than that "none" you so cheerfully offered. It's an active, difficult-to-measure class of gamers that still play games *much* older than 10 years. As far as improving them, I can give two very obvious examples:

1. Emulators themselves, which do so much to make old console games look great on displays far more advanced than the old TVs they were designed for. They've given us internet multiplayer and on-demand state saving, as well.

2. The ROM hackers, who bring us translations for games that were never brought to our shores, or graphical enhancements, new/modified levels, difficulty hacks, and total game overhauls.

I realize you're excited about the Morrowind Overhaul, but your little cheerful "none" comment about an active community enhancing 10+ year old console games is so completely, provably false, it hurts my soul a little just to explain it. Way to write off a long time corner of Internet culture.

Anyway, thanks for the screen shots. *thumbs up*

Joshie said,

...

Hey, believe me, I've emulated and played far older console games on the original hardware. I was just trying to make a point about modding - there's really nothing comprehensive to compare it to, and I think it's one of the great things about PC gaming.

THolman said,

Hey, believe me, I've emulated and played far older console games on the original hardware. I was just trying to make a point about modding - there's really nothing comprehensive to compare it to, and I think it's one of the great things about PC gaming.

to be honest custom made content and modding communities are the ONLY great things about PC gaming, the one and only thing i was sad to leave behind (remembering kotor, morrowind, oblivion, freespace, deus ex... still playing ottd )

THolman said,

Hey, believe me, I've emulated and played far older console games on the original hardware. I was just trying to make a point about modding - there's really nothing comprehensive to compare it to, and I think it's one of the great things about PC gaming.


There have literally been projects to bring the visuals and content of sequels to predecessors in console gaming. The original NES Mario ROMs have seen updates to use later 16-bit remake visuals. Entire levels have seen backports. RPGs have had original towns, monsters, characters, and overworld maps completely redrawn and redesigned. It is point-for-point the exact same sort of modding that you see in TES games.

I understand what you're saying, but it still feels like you're writing off a whole community because of particular fuzzy feelings you get when you see the same activities on one particular platform.

THolman said,

Hey, believe me, I've emulated and played far older console games on the original hardware. I was just trying to make a point about modding - there's really nothing comprehensive to compare it to, and I think it's one of the great things about PC gaming.


http://www.smwcentral.net/

Alladaskill17 said,
The fact that zero screenshots have NPC's in them is interesting, cool nonetheless.

Umm, the 4th screenshot above (the one of the house) has a NPC in the back.

The TES games are terrible RPGs with generic storylines, terrible writing, no actual dialogue, no memorable characters, combat void of tactical depth, uninteresting player character development, immense worlds filled with nothing and random encounters. The complete lack of context and purpose to everything you do in these games is an experience in nihilism and depression.

The only thing they have going for them is really nice-looking environments and excellent modding tools. So basically all TES games have become playgrounds for amateur 3d artists to show off their work. It's a thriving community but it hasn't much to do with role-playing. The trailer for this mod is a good illustration of this phenomenon.

Edited by Andre S., Oct 5 2012, 2:39am :

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