Motorola reveals plans for $50 smartphone, more device customization

Motorola raised quite a few eyebrows last year with the launch of its affordable Moto G handset, but the company is planning an even bigger push at the very lowest end of the market. While rivals such as Nokia aggressively pursue the entry level of the market with low-cost-high-value handsets, Motorola has revealed that it is keen to deliver even more affordable smartphones. 

Despite a price tag of just $179, the Moto G offers some pretty decent specs, including a 1.2GHz quad-core processor and a 4.5-inch HD (1280x720px) display. But Motorola CEO Dennis Woodside sees significant potential in targeting buyers with even more modest budgets. 

Speaking with Trusted Reviews, Woodside explained: "In much of the world, $179 is a lot of money, so there's a big market at a price point of less than $179." He added: "We're going to look at that, and just delivering on that value promise is super important. I mean, why can't these devices be $50? There's no reason that can't happen, so we're going to push that." 

Motorola's plans for the future do not lie solely at the entry level of the market though. The company launched its high-end Moto X handset with a range of user customization options, including various colour choices and combinations, rear covers with a wood finish, and custom engraving. But Woodside revealed that this is just the beginning. 

"On the premium side, we're pushing more customization," he said. "Today, you have colours and beginning of materials, but you don't have screen size and you don't have functionality, and we're going to bring all that in the next year or so." 

Earlier this month, Motorola reduced the price of the Moto X by $100, to $399 for the 16GB model.

Source: Trusted Reviews | image via Android Central

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14 Comments

Will be interesting. The Moto G is an amazing phone for it's price. The speaker is better than the Nexus 5's!

SK[ said,]Will be interesting. The Moto G is an amazing phone for it's price. The speaker is better than the Nexus 5's!


All side notes to the article...

I find it strange that so many phones have really poor speakers. Even with high end phones, this is one feature that haven't been consistently pushed with better technology.

I know a lot of users use headphones or Bluetooth, but there are times when watching Netflix or playing some music for friends it is nice to have a speaker everyone doesn't have to huddle around.

I haven't tried the speaker on the Moto yet, but will give it a try.

When Nokia launched the 928 last year, they billed it as having the loudest speaker in a smartphone. However as the 925/1020 took center stage the speaker quality took a small hit and was no longer something Nokia emphasized. (The Nokia 928 is still the loudest/clearest smartphone I have tested.)

Going back to the iPhones over the years, their speakers have not only been poor, but sometimes just unusable even as a speakerphone.

People piercing the protective membranes just to get the sound to a usable level on the iPhone 4/4s should have been a wakeup call to Apple.

The iPhone 5/5s is better, but for a 'premium' device pales in comparison to even older cheaper devices like the HTC Trophy.

I would like to see the cell phone industry take speakers seriously. Some OEMs already take microphones seriously, now it is time for a speakers to be as important as the display or other feature discussions.

I don't play movies or music aloud from my smartphone however I do watch the odd YouTube video, video call, play games that all use the speaker. Even the message and ring tones sound lackluster on the Nexus 5.
The speaker is an important piece of hardware and like you said its always overlooked.

SK[ said,]I don't play movies or music aloud from my smartphone however I do watch the odd YouTube video, video call, play games that all use the speaker. Even the message and ring tones sound lackluster on the Nexus 5.
The speaker is an important piece of hardware and like you said its always overlooked.

I find myself using the built in speaker when listening to audiobooks or podcasts. It seems like I am usually doing something that I need to be somewhat mobile, and don't want to have a connected headset or risk dropping off a Bluetooth headset.

So podcasts/audiobooks while cleaning or working outside and having a phone I don't have to throw in a dock to hear is rather nice.

Here is the specs of the upcoming Jiayu F1 $50 phone (China price), so this is the kind of specs that is possible for $50:

Android 4.2.2
4" 480x800 screen Sony TFT
dual core 1.3ghz cortex a7 mediatek MTK6572
mali 400 gpu with 720p h264 support
512mb ram
4GB Rom
5mp camera with autofocus
0.3mp front camera
LED flash
micro sd slot (upto 64GB)
2400mah battery
Sensor - Distance/light/gravity
Additional - WIFI/Bluetooth/FM/GPS
Networks - GSM/WCDMA dual-sim
WCDMA - 2100Mhz
TD - 1900/2100mHz
GSM - 850/900/1800/1900MHz
Dimensions 62.5 x 124 x 10.5mm

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