Mozilla returns the flavor, sends IE team a cake for IE10

Microsoft, back in the day, used to send the Firefox development team cupcakes each time they shipped a new version of the browser. The tradition carried on for several major Firefox releases until the company expedited version control and now seemingly releases a new version of the browser every other month. 

With the release of Windows 8, the IE team is also celebrating the next major release of their browser, IE10. Seeing an opportunity to repay past baked good debts, the Mozilla team delivered a cake to the IE10 team as a way of saying congratulations.

It's always reassuring to see corporate giants do something good for a change. In a world where suing the pants off your competitor is common-place, a pat on the back to a competitor is a remarkable gesture considering that these two entities are competitors. 

Now, how can we get in on this baked-good swapping action? 

Source: IE on Twitter

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Courtesy demands reciprocity. I just installed win8 yesterday,amazing, but I don't know how to use it. More time needed for me to familiar with it. I also installed my favprites Avant browser in it. It works although avant doens't support win8 officially. Haven't tried firefox yet. I will install firefox and chrome tonight.

They could have sent the IE team a canned meat decoration and included the note...

Enjoy the spam that IE 10 will provide the customers.

Now I know the real reason behind Mozilla's accelerated release cycle for Firefox in the last year or so... it's just an excuse to get more cake off the IE team(!) hehe!

"Now, how can we get in on this baked-good swapping action? "

surprise engadget or ars technica with a cake for any old reason, and maybe they'll reciprocate

Yeah.
And come November Microsoft is just going to release another preview version for Win 7.
No indication when the final RTM version will be released.

IE Program Management is f-ed up.

neufuse said,
except, IE10 hasn't launched yet for the Win7 markets... comon MS...
Really not like microsoft. I can't think of another occasion when they have done this. In fact IE7 launched for XP BEFORE Vista launched and IE8 shipped for Vista BEFORE Windows 7. IE9 launched for all platforms simultaneously.
If you are going to have a knee jerk anti-microsoft reaction, it would help if your complaint had some basis in reality.
Wish they would hurry up with IE10 for Win7 though.

figgy said,
Yeah.
And come November Microsoft is just going to release another preview version for Win 7.
No indication when the final RTM version will be released.

IE Program Management is f-ed up.

Or, they could have been a bit busy...

Not only is IE a BROWSER, it is also the engine, and set of runtime framework technologies that is the infrastructure for HTML5 versions of Windows 8 Apps.

So just maybe they have been optimizing and ensuring that developer Apps that recently started getting pushed out were running as expected.

IE was never a 'browser', it started out 'at Microsoft' as an HTML rendering engine. (Which is how and why software was able to use IE to render and parse HTML content.)

This 'concept' is what caused the falling out with Netscape, as they had no intention of creating an 'engine' and were determined to ONLY produce a standalone browser. Which is why AOL years after buying Netscape still HAD to use IE for their software.

With IE9, Microsoft completely restarted the IE and instead of treating Web/HTML content like an application would a document, they move to a model that treats Web/HTML content like code. So instead of obtaining, and displaying content, IE actually obtains and compiles and runs content.

This is where the major divide exists today between how IE operates and how other browsers and browser engine technologies from Mozilla, Google, Opera, etc work.

The non-IE engines/browsers still treat content like a 'document' to be displayed and rendered. Which is why you find heavy graphical and CSS3 content run up to 100 times faster in IE than they do in the other browsers.

This is also why performance of HTML5 content is far more baseline consistent on systems, as a low end Netbook can get 30fps and a high end i7 can get 60fps, where the same tests in Chrome would shift from 1fps to maybe 60fps on the i7, which really hurts web developers that want to produce richer content, but can't because they can't count on a baseline of performance on any browser other than IE9/10. (Chrome and the others are creating Web development fragmentation now, as low end systems have to be detected and given less aggressive alternative HTML5 content.)

Also by treating content like code, it is what Microsoft refers to when they say running closer to the hardware, which is how they can run even basic HTML or CSS content in a compiled form with directly created hardware level routines and even hardware targeted GPU access. IE 9 & 10 does more than just use the GPU for Direct2D for rendering.

So IE has went from an engine technology to a runtime technology or a VM/JIT/etc.

This is MAYBE why the IE team has been busy with Windows 8 and the post RTM timeframe in working out any issues for developers using HTML5 for Windows 8 App creation that is running on their runtime framework.


So maybe the IE team isn't ***ed up, especially if you realize they are a full generation ahead of other technologies, and doing so well that they were getting basic HTML5 content to run as fast as more traditional technologies like WPF/Silverlight and is why Microsoft has been able to fully embrace HTML5.

figgy said,
Yeah.
And come November Microsoft is just going to release another preview version for Win 7.
No indication when the final RTM version will be released.

IE Program Management is f-ed up.


It's f-ed up to attempt to drive users to the latest OS?

If you have a problem with Windows 8, I can understand that. Heck I have too! But this isn't the fault of IE management; they're only doing what's logical here. Focusing on their flagship product, where they want users to be. I guess you wouldn't have had a problem with this strategy if you thought Windows 8 was awesome. So blame the Windows team for building an unattractive OS, if anything.

Brandon Live said,

Actually they were full-sized cakes!
http://www.mozillazine.org/talkback.html?article=24004

But when Firefox started doing minor updates every couple months, they started sending cupcakes instead :-)

As many times as Neowin has reported this news... every cake and every cupcake, you would think they would know better.

Sadly, it seems Neowin seems to have killed the "report a problem" button.

rfirth said,

[. . .]
Sadly, it seems Neowin seems to have killed the "report a problem" button.

Hm, interesting. That must have been removed when the reporter bio box was removed. I'll find out if that link was supposed to be removed

Calum said,

Hm, interesting. That must have been removed when the reporter bio box was removed. I'll find out if that link was supposed to be removed

It's not removed, it's been moved to the drop-down on the reporter name at the top left. Took me a little while to find it a couple of days ago. Not very intuitive.

I like it when Tech companies do nice things for each other. Makes a change from all the peeing contests that go on, and the macho posturing!

ThunderBuddy said,
I wonder if they added any special ingredients to the icing

Ganja cake! Get high and satisfy the munchies at the same time

StepASide said,
Why don't they collaborate & make a new browser.. and end this browser war thing..?

Competition drives innovation One provider for everything is not the best way to do things.

thealexweb said,

Competition drives innovation One provider for everything is not the best way to do things.


Stock disclaimer that is overused beyond measures. Promotes chaos, irresponsibility and incompleteness.

Phouchg said,

Stock disclaimer that is overused beyond measures. Promotes chaos, irresponsibility and incompleteness.

Stock phrase, maybe. Correct? Yes, if you think I'm wrong and you want one provider for every service in your life that's pretty much communism.

StepASide said,
Why don't they collaborate & make a new browser.. and end this browser war thing..?

And he asks "Why War?" HA! age old question if you ask me.

thealexweb said,

Stock phrase, maybe. Correct? Yes, if you think I'm wrong and you want one provider for every service in your life that's pretty much communism.


Regardless of whatever my own opinion may be, I don't like this part:

"Correct? Yes"

You aren't right simply be declaring it to be so. And following up with a challenge made up of loaded words (communism) isn't supporting the claim.

On the topic itself, there's actually *extensive* research into the effects of competition vs. the lack thereof. It isn't a binary thing--competition vs. monopoly. It's much more complicated than that, and competition's effect on the market varies based on the *amount* of competitors.

At some degrees, collusion is more likely. At other degrees, consumer confusion takes over and people can't easily make informed decisions. In many cases, the amount of choice has no impact on the quality of the products or the rate of improvement.

Competition and choice need to be better understood, and TBQH, I don't respect anyone who simply says "more choice = better", because it simply does not reflect reality.

thealexweb said,

Stock phrase, maybe. Correct? Yes, if you think I'm wrong and you want one provider for every service in your life that's pretty much communism.

I would rather have the NHS run the UK's healthcare then dozens of HMO's thank you very much.

Ad Man Gamer said,

I would rather have the NHS run the UK's healthcare then dozens of HMO's thank you very much.

For the NHS I agree but what if there was only one large company developing drugs in the world, innovation and competition on price would collapse.

thealexweb said,

For the NHS I agree but what if there was only one large company developing drugs in the world, innovation and competition on price would collapse.

Competition is driven by a common goal - profit and only (in their case by poisoning peop... I mean, developing drugs). Browser market does not have a common goal. Even more, I'd say that browser vendors don't seem to have any meaningful goals whatsoever. That's where the foremost difference is and why too many promote only chaos, and none of them individually is worth a full rouble.

Phouchg said,

Stock disclaimer that is overused beyond measures. Promotes chaos, irresponsibility and incompleteness.

Looking at your profile, you use StrangeOS. You need to switch to Win8 because your choice to use a different OS promotes chaos, irresponsibility, and incompleteness.

StepASide said,
Why don't they collaborate & make a new browser.. and end this browser war thing..?

As thealexweb mentioned. Competition drives innovation.
Even if they merged and made one browser together, what engine would it run? Trident or Gecko? It's Microsoft and they would want to use their own Trident engine most likely, so it would just end up like a re-branded IE.

Phouchg said,

Stock disclaimer that is overused beyond measures. Promotes chaos, irresponsibility and incompleteness.

Stock? No, but your reply seems more like a stock reply. Consider how many major browsers there are today. Opera isn't a major browser. So there are three. Three browsers. Chaotic? If three big browsers imply "chaos", I can only assume two are "frustrating", and one is "barely OK".

Either your reply hasn't got anything to do with the guy you're replying to, or you have a completely different view of competition than me.

PALMERx64 said,

As thealexweb mentioned. Competition drives innovation.


Stop quoting from Economics for Dummies textbook.

Northgrove said,
No, but your reply seems more like a stock reply.
[..] you have a completely different view of competition than me.

Probably. I'm typing it everytime someone pretends to another Adam Smith or something by spewing their "laws of free market" and the likes.

You were told already - even in proper textbooks it isn't that simple as we were all told in the elementary.

Nothing has changed for the worse or the better for years. There is zero innovation regarding browsers. There is catchup game to vague standards and philosophies. There is no profit (secondary factors like brand recognition are why they are still being released at all)

Please see how competition drives innovation in mobile app stores where there's tens of browsers (among other things) that do the same thing and do it very badly.