Mozilla's 2005 Revenue: $52.9 million

Mozilla Foundation chairman Mitchell Baker disclosed the revenue earned in 2005: $52.9 million.

"The revenue is from the easy 'search' capabilities built into Firefox and the related revenue relationships with the search providers," she said. Big deal you say? Well it's quite a big deal considering the foundation's 2003 revenue was $2.4 million and the 2004 revenue was $5.8 million.

Granted, 2006 figures were not released, but the figures from the three consecutive years that were released are enough to emphasize how far Mozilla has come from its original 10 employees. With expenses of $8.2 million in 2005, it doesn't take a math major to realize that profit in 2005 was huge.

News source: C|Net

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"it doesn’t take a math major to realize that profit in 2005 was huge."

And people thought Mozilla was not-for profit. Fools.

C_Guy said,
"it doesn’t take a math major to realize that profit in 2005 was huge."

And people thought Mozilla was not-for profit. Fools.


You really have no clue what a non-profit organization is, do you? The Mozilla Foundation is a California non-profit corporation exempt from Federal income taxation under IRC 501c(3). Just because an organization is non-profit, it doesn't mean that it can't raise funds. Why do you think churches pass around the collection plate and how about PBS & NPR pledge drives?

From the Mozilla website:

"The Mozilla Foundation exists to provide organizational, legal, and financial support for the Mozilla open-source software project and its mission to preserve choice and promote innovation on the Internet. The Mozilla Foundation was incorporated as a California not-for-profit corporation to ensure that the Mozilla project continues to exist beyond the participation of individual volunteers, to enable contributions of intellectual property and funds and to provide a vehicle for limiting legal exposure while participating in open-source software projects."

"The Mozilla Foundation was established in July 2003 with start-up support from America Online's Netscape division. The Mozilla Corporation was subsequently established in August 2005 as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Foundation to coordinate the development and marketing of Mozilla technologies and products."


The Mozilla Corporation is a taxable subsidiary that serves the non-profit, public benefit goals of its parent, the Mozilla Foundation, and the Mozilla community.

The exemption does not apply to other Federal taxes such as employment taxes. Additionally, a tax-exempt organization must pay federal tax on income that is unrelated to their exempt purpose. Failure to maintain operations in conformity to the laws may result in an organization losing its tax exempt status.

Also in the United States, individual states and localities offer nonprofits exemptions from other taxes such as sales tax or property tax. Federal tax-exempt status does not guarantee exemption from state and local taxes. These exemptions generally have separate application processes and their requirements may differ from the IRS requirements. Furthermore, even a tax exempt organization may be required to file annual financial reports at the state and federal level.

You didn't like the mozzerella/open sauce references? lol.

I can't beleive they made this much money from 'free' software... It's almost disturbing...

mrmckeb said,
You didn't like the mozzerella/open sauce references? lol.

I can't beleive they made this much money from 'free' software... It's almost disturbing...


In this case, we are just listening to our membership

mrmckeb said,
I can't beleive they made this much money from 'free' software... It's almost disturbing...

Would you rather pay for it, then?

The open source business model isn't all that bad, it can, and does, make money. The real way to kill off the income, though, is to cease work on the project. Mozilla obviously hasn't, and the money has came in. There's nothing wrong with donations and ad supported revenue (NOT adware) -- and very few (if they had a company like Mozilla's) would disagree.

Thank you for caring enough to change this story to a more reliable source. That is why I love neowin. (BTW I am talking about moving from INQ not c|net as slimy mentioned above)