MySQL reserves features for paying customers

Open-source darling MySQL is facing a new uprising within its customer base over plans disclosed this week to reserve some key upcoming features, and their source code, for paying users of its namesake database.

Officials at Sun Microsystems Inc., which acquired MySQL in February, confirmed that new online backup capabilities now under development will be offered only to MySQL Enterprise customers — not to the much larger number of users of the free MySQL Community edition.

The plan was detailed during meetings at MySQL's annual user conference in Santa Clara, Calif., during which Sun also delayed until late June the release of a MySQL 5.1 upgrade in order to iron out some remaining bugs.

This is the second dust-up between MySQL and its users in the past eight months. Last August, an earlier decision to stop making the MySQL Enterprise source code openly available to users without paid subscriptions drew criticism from some members of the MySQL community.

View: Full Article @ Computer World

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13 Comments

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so what does this mean if you use mysql for amarok library management? nothing right? or will you now not be able to fetch online stuff for your library?

Nothing. They are not removing features, just not adding some of the new ones to the community version.
And the online stuff is being fetched by amarok anyway, not mysql.

(GreyWolfSC said @ #2)
What license is MySQL under? Can they legally close it?

If all the code was written by Sun or obtained from other people not under the GPL and not under any licenses that stop them from closing the source, they can close it forever if they wanted to

It doesn't look like they are closing anything, just making some features available for paying customers only. As long as those customers get the full source code Sun would be complying with the GPL.

(ichi said @ #2.2)
It doesn't look like they are closing anything, just making some features available for paying customers only. As long as those customers get the full source code Sun would be complying with the GPL.

maybe, but wouldn't the paying user that buys the source have the right to distribute the source himself with or without modification?

(XerXis said @ #2.3)
maybe, but wouldn't the paying user that buys the source have the right to distribute the source himself with or without modification?

Sure, as long as it's distributed under the GPL.

(Express said @ #1)
PostgreSQL supports has online backup and its free.

But postgresql S*CK!. It's way unstable, slow and lack of many tools needing to a correct use. Postgresql a poorly oracle imitation.


(Magallanes said @ #1.2)

But postgresql S*CK!. It's way unstable, slow and lack of many tools needing to a correct use. Postgresql a poorly oracle imitation.


+1
I don't know much about databases, but when a standard user that has been given access to view data in one database has the ability to view data in every table in the whole of PgSQL, you know you have a severly screwed-up security-wise program installed

(Magallanes said @ #1.2)


But postgresql S*CK!. It's way unstable, slow and lack of many tools needing to a correct use. Postgresql a poorly oracle imitation.


Eh? How long has it been since you've used PG? I have used it almost every single day for an application that I helped develop for about two years now, and it is nothing like what you are describing. I have yet to encounter a time where a tool was needed that PG didn't have. Perhaps this will motivate MySQL developers to move to PG and make it a better system. The only thing that I did have a complaint about with PG was that the backup and restore proceedures were not as smooth as MySQL, but when I performed a migration to that latest version (a few months ago) I encountered no such problems, which meant I no longer had that issue since it worked flawlessly.

At first I didn't see the problem, but a friend of mine brought up some great points that have made me think otherwise.