NASA photo, video collection to be digitized

In the next five years, NASA's archives of manned and unmanned space missions, a 50-year collection of photos, videos, films and other material, is about to be put online into a central searchable archive by the non-profit, San Francisco-based Internet Archive. The effort will be paid for solely through grants, foundations and individual contributions received by the Internet Archive. NASA already has much of its collection online, but the material is divided up into more than 20 different imagery categories, making it hard to find specific images or archives unless a user knows exactly where it is.

Paul Hickman, office manager for the Internet Archive, said the group will house the digitized collection on its high-capacity redundant servers in San Francisco, Europe and Egypt. Presently, the group handles an estimated 5 petabytes of storage, but more capacity can be added. The images and other data will likely be provided to the Internet Archive on hard drives so that it can be transferred to the group's archives for storage, Hickman said. Other materials, including printed documents, microfilm, books, computer presentations, audio files and VHS video, will be scanned or copied and then digitized for the online archive.

News source: ComputerWorld

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In the next five years (...) is about to be put online into a central searchable archive

[...]

NASA already has much of its collection online, but the material is divided up into more than 20 different imagery categories, making it hard to find specific images or archives unless a user knows exactly where it is.

So...most of this stuff's already online, only hard to find. The real news is that it's gonna be re-indexed and more easily searched.

Where's this NASA photo, video collection to be digitized headline coming from then? Sounds to me like if it's already online, then the digitization (for lack of better word) has already taken place...doesn't sounds like the digitization of whatever material left that hasn't been digitized isn't really the point of the actual article.

?!?

so does this mean that NASA is going to find the original footage of the men on earth but claim it to be the moon and re-do it using more recent effects, hell make it High-Def and get lucasarts to make an entire film out of it... hah

Great news -- it's not that easy as I have wished to search their archives right now. Like the article says, it's in so many different databases, using so many different search forms, and so on. Not to mention the trouble to even *get* to the proper search engines for the material you wish to find. The NASA web network can be a bit of a maze at times.

So I hope this new service will have a friendly UI in addition to a central location. It can be surprisingly hard to find something random like a high res image of a Saturnian moon right now, although NASA sure *has* the images online, somewhere.