New anti-social app 'Cloak' helps you hide from friends

A new app has hit the iOS app store, with a unique anti-social selling point.

The app, called 'Cloak', scrapes social media sites such as Foursquare and Instagram so you can figure out where your friends are - and effectively avoid them. Cloak displays a map with the last known location of your friends (or enemies) so you can dodge any awkward run-ins; the app also has the option to send push notifications when someone you know is nearby.

According to its app store page, Cloak describes itself as "the antisocial network"; a welcome avoidance to social interaction in the hypersocial world. It even makes a nod to Google's famed private browsing setting, referring to itself as "Incognito Mode for real life".

Some have dismissed the app as a simple gimmick, but Cloak's creators maintain that it has a purpose. In an interview with the Washington Post, Cloak developer and former Buzzfeed creative director Chris Baker defended its use.

Personally, I think we've seen the crest of the big social network. Things like Twitter and Facebook are packed elevators where we're all crammed in together. I think anti-social stuff is on the rise. You'll be seeing more and more of these types of projects.

Cloak is currently free in the iOS app store, and while it isn't currently available for Android, its developers claim they will "expand the idea" if it proves to be a hit with users.

Source: BBCImage via Apple app store

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18 Comments

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Romero said,
Or perhaps don't accumulate all those fake "friends" in the first place?

While I agree with you, sometimes it is not just possible.

ZipZapRap said,
no, it's always possible
This. If you feel compelled somehow to make fake friends then there's something wrong. You shouldn't feel obligated to accept every friend request or hand out your social media contact details to even casual acquaintances.

Romero said,
Or perhaps don't accumulate all those fake "friends" in the first place?

There are many reasons for making someone friend and being social friend to them. Again, it's not mandatory to enclose myself to him for being "friend"

I've got a better solution; delete your "social" account(s), like I did, not that I even wanted it in the first place. Good riddance; for me 90-95% of requests were from not real friends anyway.

nitins60 said,
There are many reasons for making someone friend and being social friend to them. Again, it's not mandatory to enclose myself to him for being "friend"
I don't know what you mean by "enclose", but if you want to avoid all these fake friends IRL and are trying so hard not to run into them then surely there's something amiss. Nope, personally I can't think of why I'd want to accept anyone like this as a friend online who I'd want to hide from IRL.

ZipZapRap said,

no, it's always possible


It is very much possible when someone lives under a rock.

There are people who have to handle communities, organize events or anything that involves communicating/coordinating with lots of people. Not just go to school/office and sit in the house all day.

I had (yes Had to) to add everyone from work, not that I like any one of them (maybe 3 or 4) but everyone apparantly needs to know everything about everyone at my workplace.

Geranium_Z__NL said,
I had (yes Had to) to add everyone from work, not that I like any one of them (maybe 3 or 4) but everyone apparantly needs to know everything about everyone at my workplace.

There are two words for such workmates; "piss off". You know the american version.

Shiranui said,
The definition of "friend" has become far to broad these days, so I can see why you might want this.

"acquaintance" is far more accurate definition