New bridge chip to bring GeForce 8 series to AGP

Due to continued demand, particularly from Internet cafe and emerging markets, for AGP-based products, Nvidia is scheduled to launch an updated bridge chip which supports the company's newer GPUs in October, according to sources at graphics card makers. Nvidia's BR02 chip was designed to convert the company's PCI Express-based GeForce 7600 (G73) GPU to support AGP, however, this chip is not compatible with GeForce 8 series GPUs. A new version, A05, will work with current GeForce 8600 (G86) and 8400 (G84) GPUs and well as the upcoming G92 and G98, noted the sources.

View: The full story
News source: DigiTimes

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Apple to announce HDD-less iPods tomorrow?

Next Story

ISO votes to reject Microsoft's OOXML as standard

36 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Again and again, I've been hearing all this about AGP being a bottleneck when it comes to performance, and the 8800GTS specifically is cited as an example. Let me remind you of exactly *why* the 8800GTS demands full PCIe X16 compliance; there is *one* chipset manufacturer supplying full-bandwidth PCIe X16 chipsets (and it isn't Intel, VIA, or AMD). In short, the 8800GTS was designed specifically around the nForce 5xx and 6xx PCIe specification, which includes all 16 PCIe lanes. Since nVidia designed both products, this is perfectly understandable. However, because neither AMD (or more telling, Intel) has not seen fit to add dual PCIe X16 compliancy to their chipsets, the PCIe X16 dual-slot specification (though present) has become proprietary-by-default, as only nVidia is actually using it.

If you stick with AGP, you better get used to never being able to play the latest games at the best resolutions and with anything but the bare-minimum options turned on (and eventually you won't be able to play any new games at all).
AGP means no SLI, no Crossfire, no high-end cards.
Enjoy your cheap little system, my friend.
All the 8800 series and X2900 series cards need 16 lanes of PCIe or they are farked. There's a reason they don't make AGP versions of those cards: Not enough bus bandwidth.

Now look sad and say "duh'oh"

I am used to the fact that I can't play these games because I simply dont. My intentions for my computer never included gaming and never will. I have consoles for that and I am much comfortable with them. My system may be cheap now but I've put over $2000 in the past couple years. Pretty good for someone who doesn't even have a job, don't you think? I'll stick to AGP and keep my Athlon Xp2800 until I need to upgrade. Not just to have the latest and best to show off my crapload of money and lack of brains. Or maybe that's the other way around?

I'm glad .... For your info there are a lot of high-quality mobos AGP8X compliant ...It will fit perfect with my Abit Fatal1ty AN8 with S939 Opteron...So, with a cheap upgrade I will still have a kick-ass rig ... ( ...still is ...!!! )...AGP is not gone and not forgoten ...! Bravo ...!

If you stick with AGP, you better get used to never being able to play the latest games at the best resolutions and with anything but the bare-minimum options turned on (and eventually you won't be able to play any new games at all).
AGP means no SLI, no Crossfire, no high-end cards.
Enjoy your cheap little system, my friend.
All the 8800 series and X2900 series cards need 16 lanes of PCIe or they are farked. There's a reason they don't make AGP versions of those cards: Not enough bus bandwidth.

Now look sad and say "duh'oh"

Croquant said,
If you stick with AGP, you better get used to never being able to play the latest games at the best resolutions and with anything but the bare-minimum options turned on (and eventually you won't be able to play any new games at all).
AGP means no SLI, no Crossfire, no high-end cards.
Enjoy your cheap little system, my friend.
All the 8800 series and X2900 series cards need 16 lanes of PCIe or they are farked. There's a reason they don't make AGP versions of those cards: Not enough bus bandwidth.

Now look sad and say "duh'oh"

But the 8600 isn't a real gamer's card to begin with, it's basically a 7600 with DX10 and HD video decoding - not the best by any stretch, but nothing that AGP can't handle.

Casual gamers don't care about the 8800 or SLI, and like wise, serious gamers will scoff at AGP and the 8600, hence the two different segments.

8600 PCIX cards will probably be cheaper than the AGP ones, not sure if it would make economic sense to stick with AGP when it comes down to it though.

Croquant said,
If you stick with AGP, you better get used to never being able to play the latest games at the best resolutions and with anything but the bare-minimum options turned on (and eventually you won't be able to play any new games at all).
AGP means no SLI, no Crossfire, no high-end cards.
Enjoy your cheap little system, my friend.
All the 8800 series and X2900 series cards need 16 lanes of PCIe or they are farked. There's a reason they don't make AGP versions of those cards: Not enough bus bandwidth.

Now look sad and say "duh'oh"

you mean he'd have to play the game for the game play and not teh purdy piktures? ohh the humanity.

Croquant said,
If you stick with AGP, you better get used to never being able to play the latest games at the best resolutions and with anything but the bare-minimum options turned on (and eventually you won't be able to play any new games at all).
AGP means no SLI, no Crossfire, no high-end cards.
Enjoy your cheap little system, my friend.
All the 8800 series and X2900 series cards need 16 lanes of PCIe or they are farked. There's a reason they don't make AGP versions of those cards: Not enough bus bandwidth.

Now look sad and say "duh'oh"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I know the tech issues you point on.... but I don´t send to garbage a fine mobo ...As You said I will enjoy my cheap litle system...take for sure...

Well you know all the buzz lately about the Internet cafe scene and AGP.. it's been madness, and frankly I for one am glad to see some support for this...

That is insane. Internet cafe machines should be running with on-board video at best. They're not gaming machines. Heck, if I was making an internet cafe I'd just put out a lot of locked-down thin-client boxes and some nicely secured WiFi nodes. Nobody in a internet cafe needs AGP cards. It's not a freaking LAN party. You wanna fragfest with your coffee? Bring your gaming rig and we'll supply the bandwidth (for a price).

There are Internet cafes for gamers you know...maybe not in the US, but certainly throughout Asia. And they don't want to buy a whole new computer just to support a new graphics card, anymore than most PC gamers do.

Is there really a point? Won't the AGP bandwidth constrict these cards like crazy? And what about the CPU bottleneck? The only advantage I can see for sure here is the DirectX 10 support, but you may not be able to play the DirectX 10 games well, due to the other hardware you'll have in the system if the motherboard is still of the AGP kind.

I for one am glad to see nVIDIA creating AGP compatible cards. Why should I buy a new computer when the only upgrade I need is a new video card and I have an AGP 8x slot?

My new GeForce 7800 will save me from having to buy a whole new computer for a few more years at least.

I have been quite happy with my 7800GS AGP card. Despite having few pipelines, it holds it own against the 7800 GTX GO PCIe installed in my laptop.

Budious said,
I have been quite happy with my 7800GS AGP card. Despite having few pipelines, it holds it own against the 7800 GTX GO PCIe installed in my laptop.

Why isn't it? 7800GS has 16 pipes, the GTX GO has 20 pipes. Both have 1200MHz 256MB DDR3 at stock speeds. The GTX only has 4 extra pipes enabled.

The reason is that laptop cards are VERY underpowered compared to desktop cards. So you're basically saying your desktop card is doing a very good job of holding up like crap.

Yes, please let AGP die.

To really take advantage of the current generation of video cards, one needs a current-gen CPU. Which means a current-gen motherboard. Which means no AGP slot, because nobody makes motherboards with AGP slots anymore.

Nvidia is doing this simply because there's demand from the low-end of the market. You can't really blame them; it's a sound business decision. I'm just concerned that continuing to support the AGP interface with new bridge chips is not in the best interests of the PC industry as a whole. I think we want to move towards PCIe 2.0 now and let AGP die already.

Meh, I'd rather just get a new computer altogether. Don't see the point to waste money on outdated technology.

Hell, my PC used to be top of the line.. Now.. reading the BioShock computer requirements... my PC is on the "minimal to play" list. D:

Dakkaroth said,
Meh, I'd rather just get a new computer altogether. Don't see the point to waste money on outdated technology.

Hell, my PC used to be top of the line.. Now.. reading the BioShock computer requirements... my PC is on the "minimal to play" list. D:

Same here! Same exact minimum requirements list, too! haha

raskren said,
They need to support the ISA bus. My 33Mhz 486 SX needs an upgrade!

pfff, where is the Amiga version??? My A500 needs a new graphics card.

If this is true and it's worth it performance wise against my AGP 7600GT then i'll see about buying one - Saves me from having to upgrade for a little while longer.

Agreed. I'm not buying an entirely new computer (PCIx, new CPU, new RAM, etc.) just because the gf8 series is only on PCIx. Heck, the drivers for those cards are only now starting to actually work, lol. I would much rather buy a cheap AGP series 8 card (losing a whopping 5% performance, tops) and save all the rest of the money.

Computer parts drop in price constantly now, I am flabbergasted at how cheap a *much better* video card than my 6800GS is now.
Anyone demanding newer cards to work with aging technology can't put down their 2 packs of cancer sticks and 3 gallons of Tim Horton's coffee a day to actually SAVE say... $25-50 a month to save up for a freakin' NICE card and then feel like they truly earned it when they bought it.
Hell, or just make friends with a rich guy who upgrades every 6 months and sells the other 6-month old card (which is still brand new and wicked) for half the price. A $800 card half price is $400. Save for half a year and get yourself that card.
Anyone who doesn't think they can do that is just making excuses.

You think I'm making awesome money? I wanna get a $150 card but can't because we have a baby coming in Feb and my wife is going on maternity leave.

No, but I think you're someone that can't read an article past the title.

Due to continued demand, particularly from Internet cafe and emerging markets

I appreciate the tirade against smoking and coffee drinking (?), but at least try to be relevant.

Isn't there a cutoff when the AGP bottleneck will cut off any advantage of having a faster GPU?

I mean, I kinda hope not so I can put off getting a new machine for longer but I'm sure there will be some kind of performance loss on AGP versions of the 8 series, right?

_MacGyver_ said,
Isn't there a cutoff when the AGP bottleneck will cut off any advantage of having a faster GPU?

IIRC, the advantage of having an AGP 7800GS over an AGP 6800GS (what I had until recently) was all of 3fps in most modern games, so I assume an 8 series card will be similar.

Of course, the main advantage of having an 8 series card is DX10 support, but as you say, the actual performance increase over a 7 series or even possibly a 6 series card on AGP will be pretty minimal.

Esvandiary said,
IIRC, the advantage of having an AGP 7800GS over an AGP 6800GS (what I had until recently) was all of 3fps in most modern games, so I assume an 8 series card will be similar.

That may be true (although unlikely [I used to own a 7800 GS AGP, BTW]), but I hope you're not drawing the conclusion that the AGP bus is the limiting factor.

The ASRock 775Dual-VSTA supports AGP and PCIe cards but the PCIe implementation only supports 4 lanes. 4 PCIe lanes is about the same bandwidth as AGP 8x. I upgraded my againg 7800 GS to an 8800 GTS and, of course, performance improved considerably. I think a reasonable person can assume that a 8800 series graphics card does not consume the equivalent of full AGP 8x bandwidth (2.1333 GB/s).

raskren said,
I think a reasonable person can assume that a 8800 series graphics card does not consume the equivalent of full AGP 8x bandwidth (2.1333 GB/s).

I'd imagine it isn't far off as the 8800GTX requires PCIe x16 and won't function in a PCIe x8 slot. PCIe 2.0 is also around the corner and I imagine it won't be long until cards start exploiting it, though that isn't to say PCIe x16 will be a huge bottleneck.