New Google Glass "OK Glass" UI video released; pre-orders expand

It's been nearly a year since Google first announced its plans for "Project Glass", a set of smart glasses that will offer users a variety of interactive features. Google's been quiet about its progress for a little while but today the company offered up a new video that shows how Google Glass (its official name) will work from the perspective of its owners.

The video clip on YouTube shows Google Glass being used in a variety of locations and situations. Owners are shown recording video via voice command, which starts out by the owners saying "OK Glass" before performing a tasks. That feautre appears to be just the tip of the iceberg. They were also using it for two-way video communication, with the people on the other side seeing what the Google Glass owner is wearing. The clip shows that voice commands can access information such as weather, GPS, language translation, and more from within the glasses' HUD. Users can also receive and read texts messages and pictures from others and see them in the HUD.

Google launched pre-orders for Google Glass several months ago, but they were meant for developers and certain members of the media. They were also priced out of most people's reach at $1,500. While the price of getting a pre-order device has not gone down, Google announced a new way for more people to get access to the pre-production version with a new contest.

The contest is called "If I Had Glass" and asks people to write, in 50 words or less, what they would do if they got Google Glass. The entries must be posted on Twitter or Google+ with the hashtag #ifihadglass. Users can also upload pictures or even a short video to accompany their entry. The deadline is February 27th. If you are one of the people Google picks, you will not only have to purchase the $1,500 pre-production model but you must also attend an event to pick them the glasses up in New York, San Francisco or Los Angeles.

Source: Google

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Teebor said,

So you have to go to the trouble of entering the competition and then IF you are chosen as the winner you have to cough up the money to buy the glasses AND get yourself to an event to pick them up?
No thanks

And your point is? If you want them, this isn't going through any trouble. I don't see where your question is.

Teebor said,

So you have to go to the trouble of entering the competition and then IF you are chosen as the winner you have to cough up the money to buy the glasses AND get yourself to an event to pick them up?
No thanks

What's the problem? It's not a free giveaway, is it?

DarkNet said,
That would be even better. But why contact lenses? Why not just replace your eyeball?

My current eyeballs suck. I want a replacement.
No contacts/glasses ftw.

Torolol said,
with glasses, touchscreen became irrelevant

I agree imagine combination of the glass and something like MS Kinect that capture figure gesture would be awesome.

Wow I cannot begin to express how underwhelming that is. If anyone actually believes its going to work like that! especially in noisy environments, idea has merit, however not for everyday use

Okay Glass, I have -7 in one eye and +3 in my other, cylinders in both. Now go and correct that!
I probably end up with a Google add for a dog and a walking stick right…?

Am i the only one to see what's going to be the number 1 usage of this tech?
Porn!!
Creating a video gallery of your conquests beats notches on bedposts...

Despite our leanings most of us can agree that the idea is neat. However, I can't be the only one who wonders how this is really possible. This isn't criticism, this is confusion. I'm looking for a real discussion.

They're going to cram, wifi, LTE, Bluetooth, camera, a very good microphone, gps and some sort of display into something light enough to rest on my glasses.

1. That doesn't seem possible to miniaturize all those components enough. Even if you ran a wire to a belt unit, the components needed at the top seem like they'd be a tight fit.

2. All those things running drain cell phones with huge batteries very quickly.

3. Is anyone else worried about someone else yelling 'Go Glass Email "You're Ugly!!" To Address book behind you? This sort of thing happened with the voice navigation when Vista launched. Or just innocently picking up someone else's commands nearby, like a restaurant.

Again, I'm not being a dick, I'm interested in answering how some serious technical hurdles would be cleared.

Screen in glasses connected via bluetooth to the cellphone in your pocket which is actually doing all the work.

You can probably customize the keyword that you need to use to actually do anything and probably gets trained to your voice for that word only. an accelerometer used right could detect whether you're actually talking or not and technology found in that (jawbone?) bluetooth headset could make sure that it only hears your voice.

Edited by Mark, Feb 20 2013, 5:38pm :

echostorm said,
Despite our leanings most of us can agree that the idea is neat. However, I can't be the only one who wonders how this is really possible. This isn't criticism, this is confusion. I'm looking for a real discussion.

They're going to cram, wifi, LTE, Bluetooth, camera, a very good microphone, gps and some sort of display into something light enough to rest on my glasses.

1. That doesn't seem possible to miniaturize all those components enough. Even if you ran a wire to a belt unit, the components needed at the top seem like they'd be a tight fit.

2. All those things running drain cell phones with huge batteries very quickly.

3. Is anyone else worried about someone else yelling 'Go Glass Email "You're Ugly!!" To Address book behind you? This sort of thing happened with the voice navigation when Vista launched. Or just innocently picking up someone else's commands nearby, like a restaurant.

Again, I'm not being a dick, I'm interested in answering how some serious technical hurdles would be cleared.


Let me ask, why all these assumptions?

Why does it need LTE?
Why does it need GPS?
When it has Bluetooth, why can't it get it from the phone how it is intended to be used?

Why are you assuming voice commands are always live. Wouldn't you think it would be a button that needs to be pressed to deliver commands? Or if you are on a particular app, they would be live when it was open.

The way I see it, the notifications are live. When a notification is received, you have the opportunity to deliver an action.

I'm not being a dick either but I see a lot of assumptions on your part (which is good) because at least you can better understand the technology now.

ACTIONpack said,
Pretty good but how much will it be?

$1,500 for now but probably will be cheaper when mass produce for the whole world.

Why? What's the current battery like. I assume you know because you said it needs better battery hardware. As in better than what it currently uses. Please, enlighten me.

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