New Intel technology to make it possible to download an HD movie in a second

As the technology industry prepares for the adoption of USB 3.0 (in anticipation of the increased speeds), Intel has been hard at work on technology that will be far faster. In fact, it is capable of transferring the entire printed catalog of material within the Library of Congress in only a minute and a half. The technology makes use of silicon and light to achieve this incredible feat.

According to Gizmodo via Intel Tech Research, “Intel detailed their breakthrough to the press at an event today, marking the milestone of impressive 50 gigabits per second transfer speeds using an underlying technology that could go much, much further. We've covered the promise of fiber optic speeds before, but nothing like this. Intel CTO Justin Rattner explained just what "silicon photonics" even means, why the world needs it, and what it promises in the near future.”

Silicon Photonics

Image Credit: Gizmodo

Silicon photonics may sound something out of a science fiction story, but it is nothing more than the combination of silicon and optical technologies. Because of the fact that it uses existing technology, Silicon photonics can be made very affordable. This technology works by converting electrons into photons and back again. Once the photons become electrons, the electronics work the same way that they have since their invention (using electrical current to flip transistors on or off – thus resulting in digital 0’s and 1’s).

What makes this technology even more impressive is the process of encoding data into laser streams on wiring that is on the same size scale as your fingernail. During the process, the streams converge and move along a fiber optic strand. When they arrive at their destination, they get decoded back to electrons.

This technology may seem like overkill, but imagine the future when more and more data needs transferred back and forth. Every aspect of our lives is becoming more and more digitized and only so much of that data can be managed at one time on existing technology. As we approach the area of 10 gigabit per second speeds, copper wiring becomes useless. The quality of the data that is transferred over the copper is degraded beyond usefulness.

However, the speed of light is the fastest speed currently known to physics and Intel can use this to an advantage. As it stands now, they can already transfer an entire movie or 100 hours of music in one second. If they manage to hit their theoretical 1 terabit per second limit, it would be possible to backup an entire hard drive in that same timeframe (one second). It may be a while before we see this technology, but the potential is game changing.

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LiquidSolstice said,
I don't think people are getting the point here. This has, from what I read, absolutely nothing to do with internet speeds. It's all local transfer rates, this competes with SSDs, not internet connections. The use of the word "download" in the title is a pretty big mistake and that's probably why it's getting all these comments.

So, Intel is going to replace pretty new SATA with this stuff? Not bad. Intel always finds the ways how to clean up our pockets...

cpu said,

So, Intel is going to replace pretty new SATA with this stuff? Not bad. Intel always finds the ways how to clean up our pockets...

I'm not sure if that's where this would theoretically be used. I could see these links as high speed transports between disparate components as in a way to replace the mobo bus but in a much faster and more flexible configuration.

Tim Dawg said,
I'm not sure if that's where this would theoretically be used. I could see these links as high speed transports between disparate components as in a way to replace the mobo bus but in a much faster and more flexible configuration.

That would be a good implementation as well. I imagine it will be used a lot in that capacity.

Without iTunes locking up/freezing during the sync too please. TBH anything is better than the 3-4mb every 20 seconds which my iTunes currently transfers at.

You know, I cant help but feel this is a little overkill until other technologies catch up. So yeah, you can transfer 50gb/s but do we have HDD's that can read/write 50gb/s? I mean currently some of the fastest HDD write speeds are in the 215+MB/s range, which is roughly 1.6Gb/s. So your talking about a transfer speed up to 31x faster then can be physically written to a HDD. So assuming you use a RAM buffer you would still hit a bottleneck in terms of storing the data being that "most" people have HDD's with 8MB-32MB ram buffers.

I dont anticipate any practical use of this technology until we see a leap forward in storage devices to match. Still its always nice to see these amazing proof of concept demo's.

OMG...don't keep on telling us how fast intel can make the faster speed....Just quickly put USB3.0

into mainstream first,because we couldn't even figure out this stuff will even work as we expect!!!!

"However, the speed of light is the fastest speed currently known to physics and Intel can use this to an advantage."

Compared to what? What advantage? What speed do you think electron based information travels through a copper wire? The speed of sound?

monkey13 said,
"However, the speed of light is the fastest speed currently known to physics and Intel can use this to an advantage."

Compared to what? What advantage? What speed do you think electron based information travels through a copper wire? The speed of sound?

Electrons travel through matter (Copper) in a zig zag, meaning that it is not a direct path, and a lot of energy is wasted. It's nowhere near the speed of light.

All we need now are computers that will be able to handle the processing of Zipping the Internet in a single file - Hope Gmail will allow for archives that big soon

Yeah, Intel can live in their fantasy world that will never happen. ISP's hardly give any speed as it is. Its all hype.

This does not seem to actually be talking about broadband internet, but rather USB-wise file transfer...

So you'll be able to upload an entire HD movie from your internal hard drive to your external

ArmedMonkey said,
This does not seem to actually be talking about broadband internet, but rather USB-wise file transfer...

So you'll be able to upload an entire HD movie from your internal hard drive to your external

That's how I read it as well. But the technology could certainly have countless uses as it matures as well... Though initially this would, I feel, be the first logical step, once it gains ground and begins being implemented in infrastructure, anything could really happen.

HeLGeN-X said,
Imagine the porn viewing possibilities. You could seek through megaupload video files in no time.

Dunno about you, but I can do without HD porn, they airbrush those girls for a reason. Although the download speed would be nice.

Soviet said,

Dunno about you, but I can do without HD porn, they airbrush those girls for a reason. Although the download speed would be nice.

ROFL!

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