New Windows Phone 7 details; Live ID integration and OEM restrictions

WMPoweruser has posted some juicy information regarding Windows Phone 7's underlying architecture. The leaked architecture guide was found to contain some previously unknown information regarding the upcoming OS. Here's what we didn't know before:

  • Your phone is heavily linked to your Windows Live ID (much like an Android phone is to your Google account)
  • Users will be asked to log in at first boot and asked to accept the EULA
  • Hardware will be verified through a Genuine Windows Phone certification before an ID will be accepted
  • Without a Live ID, contact sync, use of the Marketplace, and use of Microsoft services are not possible
  • Phone processes will be able to utilize up to 1GB of the phone's RAM (high limit takes future hardware into account)
  • No Bluetooth 3 support
  • OEMs are responsible for Direct3D drivers
  • OEMs will be limited to 6 pre-installed apps, taking up a max of 60 MB
  • OEMs cannot install trialware
  • OEMs can change the default search engine in Mobile Internet Explorer, but cannot remove Bing as the phone's default search provider

WMPoweruser also notes something interesting regarding the way these phones will handle file storage. "Windows Phone 7 devices will use Microsoft Unified Storage System for user files, meaning applications will not be able to distinguish between files on internal storage and main memory.  This also means if the user removes the memory card the smartphone will only be able to make emergency phone calls, but nothing else."

Windows Phone 7 devices are expected to ship around holiday season 2010.

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AS Microsoft in the mobile market is not dominant has a right to do all the restrictions he thinks are necessary to have a smart and neat experience and, mainly, not changing from oem to oem.
Coherence in a OS (whatever, phone, tablet, pc, netbook) is essential for best customer experiences.
If some people is annyed by this "restriction" then he can get an iPhone (which is predominant and far mor restrictive), and Android phone (which is even worse for privacy/apps/controls) or a blackberry or whatever.
If you like to moan at everything Microsoft does, I strongly invite you to look elsewere and stop writing sillinesses here, there, north, south, east and west.

Windows Phone 7 will be a very cool experience and I think Microsoft is on the right road to stop the OEM madness we sadly experience on preinstalled OS on desktops, notebooks and netbooks.
I strongly agree with the stop to the nonsense installation of loads of pure crapware/bloatware/insaneware that people DON'T use and that slow the system.
If you don't like this new directives, just be happy going elsewhere. (and enjoy your choice).

DaveGreen said,
AS Microsoft in the mobile market is not dominant has a right to do all the restrictions he thinks are necessary to have a smart and neat experience and, mainly, not changing from oem to oem.
Coherence in a OS (whatever, phone, tablet, pc, netbook) is essential for best customer experiences.
If some people is annyed by this "restriction" then he can get an iPhone (which is predominant and far mor restrictive), and Android phone (which is even worse for privacy/apps/controls) or a blackberry or whatever.
If you like to moan at everything Microsoft does, I strongly invite you to look elsewere and stop writing sillinesses here, there, north, south, east and west.

Windows Phone 7 will be a very cool experience and I think Microsoft is on the right road to stop the OEM madness we sadly experience on preinstalled OS on desktops, notebooks and netbooks.
I strongly agree with the stop to the nonsense installation of loads of pure crapware/bloatware/insaneware that people DON'T use and that slow the system.
If you don't like this new directives, just be happy going elsewhere. (and enjoy your choice).

When you will grow up you might be lucky enough to learn that respecting other people opinion will increase the credibility for your one...................

Well growing up means NOT telling others to grow up, for istance.
AND I wrote about the objective technical issues having 19079089 OEM flavours.
Stay on focus on what I wrote.

Edited by DaveGreen, Apr 20 2010, 12:22pm :

DaveGreen said,

Stay on focus on what I wrote.

I do; for example:
" I strongly invite you to look elsewere and stop writing sillinesses here, there, north, south, east and west."
I can agree or disagree with your opinions but I would not try to silence them.

DaveGreen said,
AS Microsoft in the mobile market is not dominant has a right to do all the restrictions he thinks are necessary

*smacks forehead*


Once again, regardless of what the EU might have us all believe, simply being on top of a market doesn't weigh you down with extra responsibilities, and being a bit player doesn't give you extra rights. In terms of what is/isn't legal, a company with 99% marketshare has just as much freedom as a company with 1% marketshare. The notion that a legitimately won monopoly comes with extra restrictions is a myth, and I challenge anyone to find something on the books in the United States code that says otherwise.

Interesting article with a lot of positives... I really can't wait for Windows Phone 7.

I don't really understand though why removing the storage card would limit the capabilities of my phone beyond accessing files on the removable storage card... Why would doing so cause me to only be able to make emergency calls? That's the only thing here that seems less than desirable... It strikes me as something that would be an aggravation actually...

Almost everything on that list sounds positive. Few people will have any serious complaints about the lack of bluetoooth3 (frankly is anyone even enthusiastic about BT anymore...).

What's gonna get negative press is the validation stuff, which seems to me to mean no custom ROMs for unsupported handsets. This will upset the hackers at XDA for a few weeks of forum posts, but I'm pretty sure they decided long ago to shake impotent little fists at wp7 and shun it, so it's about as meaningful as a PCWorld article about Microsoft.

Joshie said,
Almost everything on that list sounds positive. Few people will have any serious complaints about the lack of bluetoooth3 (frankly is anyone even enthusiastic about BT anymore...).

What's gonna get negative press is the validation stuff, which seems to me to mean no custom ROMs for unsupported handsets. This will upset the hackers at XDA for a few weeks of forum posts, but I'm pretty sure they decided long ago to shake impotent little fists at wp7 and shun it, so it's about as meaningful as a PCWorld article about Microsoft.

Sure because Office, W7 etc. have not been cracked.......

Fritzly said,

Sure because Office, W7 etc. have not been cracked.......

Don't be silly. It might be fun to disagree with people for disagreement's sake, but at least put a little thought into it, first. Cracking the validation process of a phone might get it to turn on and make calls, but getting it to use the marketplace? There's a reason why cheap ******* have to use free servers for MMOs--you can't just hack your way onto WoW. Online validation+online hosting of services usually add up to make hacking a pretty pointless endeavor.

However, if you can find an example to the contrary, I'd more than welcome hearing it.

You guys do realize Microsoft is literally legally not allowed to limit OEMs on Windows, right? Like...with threat of destruction of their company hanging over their heads. You want a better product? Blame the EU and the US Govts.

AgentGray said,
You guys do realize Microsoft is literally legally not allowed to limit OEMs on Windows, right? Like...with threat of destruction of their company hanging over their heads. You want a better product? Blame the EU and the US Govts.

I wonder how frustrated it is when every move they make has to go through an antitrust council. Wish they'd have more control of the OEM installs though... less crapware would be welcomed.

AgentGray said,
You guys do realize Microsoft is literally legally not allowed to limit OEMs on Windows, right? Like...with threat of destruction of their company hanging over their heads. You want a better product? Blame the EU and the US Govts.

Yeah, and I'm far from an expert when it comes to the Microsoft ruling, but limiting trialware doesn't seem like that big a deal to me. Microsoft would still be allowing them to install whatever they want, so long as it was a full product...

Personally, when buying a computer I wish I had the option to get it without all the crap because *I* said so... No huge body should have to get involved...

deep1234 said,
"OEMs cannot install trialware"

I think they are testing the idea before using it on the computer world.

It's eaiser for them to take control of WP7 compared to Windows on the desktop. You know someone would cry monopoly at first sight.

deep1234 said,
"OEMs cannot install trialware"

I think they are testing the idea before using it on the computer world.

I don't think they can do this yet. The whole monopoly thing prevents them from demanding this from OEMs. Reason #267 that the monopoly ruling hurt consumers more than it helped them.

deep1234 said,
"OEMs cannot install trialware"

I think they are testing the idea before using it on the computer world.

Yeah, this is a great restriction IMO.

MS needs to be this strict with Windows 7, or really Windows 8. It will make their platform muuuuuuuuch more sexy in the end

It's simply awesome OEM cannot install garbage trialware. If only it applies to PC people will see the difference in performance. That's the most interesting part

Grand Chelem said,
It's simply awesome OEM cannot install garbage trialware. If only it applies to PC people will see the difference in performance. That's the most interesting part

Yeah, I love that restriction too!

Grand Chelem said,
It's simply awesome OEM cannot install garbage trialware. If only it applies to PC people will see the difference in performance. That's the most interesting part

I think the restriction should be extended to PCs too. The crap OEMs preload on PCs is beyond annoying. I wonder how much pre-loaded crapware really brings down the price of an OEM PC? $100, $200? People point at the "Apple Tax" but I think it is more like the "not getting kickbacks from crapware companies tax".

Shadrack said,

I think the restriction should be extended to PCs too. The crap OEMs preload on PCs is beyond annoying. I wonder how much pre-loaded crapware really brings down the price of an OEM PC? $100, $200? People point at the "Apple Tax" but I think it is more like the "not getting kickbacks from crapware companies tax".

Second, MS need to put that same restriction on Windows OS. Interestingly enough, if you buy Desk/Lap on MS Store, it come virtually crapware free.

That's weird about the phone not working when the storage card is removed. Storage cards should be for extra storage only.

crazyfish said,
That's weird about the phone not working when the storage card is removed. Storage cards should be for extra storage only.

WEll, the first patch of phones aren't expected to have a external storage card option. It's all internal flash storage. So I dunno how this matters.

GP007 said,

WEll, the first patch of phones aren't expected to have a external storage card option. It's all internal flash storage. So I dunno how this matters.

Oh, I hadn't heard that... I hope that's not the case, as I really would want a storage card option myself... I use it a lot on the phone I have now.

I don't really understand though why removing that would limit the capabilities of my phone beyond accessing files on the removable storage card... Why would doing so cause me to only be able to make emergency calls? That's the only thing here that seems less than desirable... It strikes me as something that would be an aggravation actually...

welcome iWindows Phone.

Actually from a supportability standpoint this seems like a good thing.

How many 'average' PC users actually know/care about how their filesystem is layed out?
How many of these same users complain their OEM computer is garbage due to all of the TrialWare?
As far as DirectX drivers go, well that's always been in the OEM realm in the PC. However on the PC side of things, the chipset manufacturers have always made reference drivers which were good enough to use as production enviroment drivers.

As far as liveID goes, this should have been expected and predicted. Microsoft have been trying to become the defacto ID standard for years. Requiring their phone users to adopt the scheme will help achieve that.

Hmm, actually expected the liveID business but nice to see some restrictions on OEMs too. Stupid trialware on my phone is the last thing i want. On the BB phones it's usually shortcuts to trialware that you can't remove (unless you delete service books) but usually just hide them instead.

SHoTTa35 said,
Hmm, actually expected the liveID business but nice to see some restrictions on OEMs too. Stupid trialware on my phone is the last thing i want. On the BB phones it's usually shortcuts to trialware that you can't remove (unless you delete service books) but usually just hide them instead.

Yeah, the LiveID bit makes sense, how else are you going to use the custom services?

GP007 said,

Yeah, the LiveID bit makes sense, how else are you going to use the custom services?

Exactly. Log into them all individually? Oh god please no.... I think that this was the best way of doing this honestly.

And the OEM software / trialware restrictions are GREAT... I am so far really loving the restrictions Microsoft has been placing on the OEM's... I wish they did that with their desktop OS so I didn't have to clean up all the crap Dell or whoever puts on the PC... Though phones aren't as bad, they do come with a lot of crap anymore as well.

Edited by M_Lyons10, Apr 19 2010, 9:34pm :

figgy said,
With these kind of restrictions I hope this OS version dies soon.

You realise that OEM means companies like Dell etc.

IMO limiting the amount of junk they can pre-install on a device and stopping them from including trialware altogether sounds awesome to me.

Unplugged said,
At lot of this sounds like going backwards

Why????? what's the problem?

Your phone is heavily linked to your Windows Live ID (much like an Android phone is to your Google account) - SO! THIS IS IT

Users will be asked to log in at first boot and asked to accept the EULA - No Matter

Hardware will be verified through a Genuine Windows Phone certification before an ID will be accepted - Yes, They really need it.

Without a Live ID, contact sync, use of the Marketplace, and use of Microsoft services are not possible...hmmm...No problem...i even can't sync Android or Nokia phones without their ID (like Ovi, Google Acc.)

Phone processes will be able to utilize up to 1GB of the phone's RAM (high limit takes future hardware into account) -

No Bluetooth 3 support - We don't need it ryt now

OEMs are responsible for Direct3D drivers - No Comment..actually i dunno abt this

OEMs will be limited to 6 pre-installed apps, taking up a max of 60 MB - GREAT! So OEM can't install crapware in my fon lyk dell/acer do in my PC :@ :@

OEMs cannot install trialware - O YEAHHH....

OEMs can change the default search engine in Mobile Internet Explorer, but cannot remove Bing as the phone's default search provider - So..they are following Google..that's it

Felix_ said,

You realise that OEM means companies like Dell etc.

IMO limiting the amount of junk they can pre-install on a device and stopping them from including trialware altogether sounds awesome to me.

Exactly, No junk trialware plz.

Unplugged said,
At lot of this sounds like going backwards

These phones have Xbox Live, Zune etc . Makes sense that you'd have to have a Live ID.

thenonhacker said,

UH, NO!?! They are doing what Google is doing, so what's wrong?

Just because Google does it doesn't make it right. It is stupid to require people to link their phones to these account IDs before they can even use the devices. It is a smartphone sure, but it is still a phone at the end of the day. All of the "extras" should be optional not the other way around.

I hope you can use the phone without a live ID and that you are only required to fork it over when it has value to you as a user to do so.

Frazell Thomas said,

Just because Google does it doesn't make it right. It is stupid to require people to link their phones to these account IDs before they can even use the devices. It is a smartphone sure, but it is still a phone at the end of the day. All of the "extras" should be optional not the other way around.

I hope you can use the phone without a live ID and that you are only required to fork it over when it has value to you as a user to do so.

All phones are linked to online IDs, even a cheap phone from Verizon is linked to the SSN and the telephone number. Not sure how you see this as different.

This phone is designed around an online integration model and you probably can use it without your ID, but defeats what it is trying to accomplish by linking your IDs to facebook and all the other online services you use.

Felix_ said,

You realise that OEM means companies like Dell etc.

IMO limiting the amount of junk they can pre-install on a device and stopping them from including trialware altogether sounds awesome to me.

Exactly. I'm all for this... OEM's include way too much junk...

Frazell Thomas said,

Just because Google does it doesn't make it right. It is stupid to require people to link their phones to these account IDs before they can even use the devices. It is a smartphone sure, but it is still a phone at the end of the day. All of the "extras" should be optional not the other way around.

I hope you can use the phone without a live ID and that you are only required to fork it over when it has value to you as a user to do so.

Well, the article states "...contact sync, use of the Marketplace, and use of Microsoft services are not possible"... So, sounds like things like MyPhone, the Marketplace, and the social integration will not work without logging in (Go figure!)... I think that logging in to ONE account to do so is much preferred to logging in to them all individually... It seems that you would be able to use the phone, but would be missing out on some of the features available in the OS...

I'm not sure why this would be an issue to anyone though honestly...

thenetavenger said,

All phones are linked to online IDs, even a cheap phone from Verizon is linked to the SSN and the telephone number. Not sure how you see this as different.

This phone is designed around an online integration model and you probably can use it without your ID, but defeats what it is trying to accomplish by linking your IDs to facebook and all the other online services you use.

I don't see what the big deal is either. But the ID they are referring to is a Windows Live ID, which IMO if you are interested in a Windows phone you shouldn't have a problem with having or obtaining a Windows Live ID.

I don't think Apple requires you to login with an Apple ID to use the phone... you need it to make purchases from the App Store so it is more-or-less a requirement. But you don't need it when you first turn on the phone and you don't need it to make a phone call or get online. You do need it to download the OS updates. It really is a non-issue this whole User ID thing.

thenetavenger said,

All phones are linked to online IDs, even a cheap phone from Verizon is linked to the SSN and the telephone number. Not sure how you see this as different.

This phone is designed around an online integration model and you probably can use it without your ID, but defeats what it is trying to accomplish by linking your IDs to facebook and all the other online services you use.

This happens in the US and only if you buy a crippled/ subsidized phone. In the rest of the World people identity is tied to the SIM not the phone apps. I wonder if a user will be able to swap his SIM in someone else phone and use it.