Nexus One won't be receiving Android 4.0

The Nexus One smartphone, released in January 2010 and touted as a "superphone", won't be super for much longer after Google confirmed it won't be receiving Ice Cream Sandwich. Owners of the newer handset, the Nexus S, will be able to receive Android 4.0 when it goes public, though those who bought into Google's superphone will be unable to receive any official versions of the newer mobile OS.

Electronista reports that Android Product Management lead Hugo Barra confirmed the denial when responding to a comment made by Steve Ballmer. The Nexus One hardware is apparently too old to run Android 4.0 satisfactorily. The Nexus One was produced by HTC, and came with Android 2.1 as standard. It was supported up to Android 2.3, also known as Gingerbread. The update block has prompted technology journalists to question whether other Android phones running on the 'first-generation' 1GHz Snapdragon processor will also be left behind with Android 4.0's release.

Since Android phones are supported for 18 months after release, and the Nexus One is older than this point, it could be considered acceptable enough to end the updates made available for the device. On the other hand, though, it is surprising after Gabe Cohen, of Google, stated in Engadget that it is theoretically possible for any device running Gingerbread to be updated to Ice Cream Sandwich.

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For this reason is that Apple is leading the market. You cant just release an amazing gadget and forget about it. You need to release service update to those devices and keep the people happy to get the last OS. Android has a big future, but we are all "human". Jobs was a star

I believe the bottleneck on the N1 is the graphics... it's half the speed of the Nexus S and since ICS needs hardware acceleration it will be slow on the N1.

Since the Nexus S and the Galaxy Prime have the same graphics chip and the Galaxy prime needs to manage more pixels the two devices might be at the same perceived performance level ... maybe the the NS will have a better experience even???

AdverseDeviant said,
They announce this AFTER an ics rom port is made already.

Any "ics rom port" as of right now is NOT a true ROM port. It is based on the SDK.

Please do not spread bad information

In reality, most people dont give a **** about the update. Those that really do, doesnt matter if their phone will get the update or not from Google. They will get the update from other sources.

So whats the problem?

Edited by htcz, Oct 26 2011, 9:27pm :

What was touted as the Android phone that will get the official updates, has fallen flat on its face. Looks like Google doesn't want to lead by example. Way to drop the ball, Google.

I understand that new features require new hardware to get acceptable performance. But at least Apple provides something new for their older handsets. They actually take the time optimizing the experience for the user on the older hardware. They may have cut the 3G off too soon with 2 years, but it looks like the 3GS is going to be relevant and supported for a 3rd year now...

Shadrack said,
What was touted as the Android phone that will get the official updates, has fallen flat on its face. Looks like Google doesn't want to lead by example. Way to drop the ball, Google.

I understand that new features require new hardware to get acceptable performance. But at least Apple provides something new for their older handsets. They actually take the time optimizing the experience for the user on the older hardware. They may have cut the 3G off too soon with 2 years, but it looks like the 3GS is going to be relevant and supported for a 3rd year now...


First and foremost, the original Nexus was not very popular. Very few units were sold. To continue supporting a phone that was primarily purchased by the development community is a waste of resources and time. Additionally people have already posted videos of the original Nexus running ICS. So althought Google will not release an official OTA, the phone will still have ICS. You detractors sound like drama queens.

panacea said,
Don't know much about android:

But what the hell happened to android 3 ??
Missing files?

Android 3.0 is Honeycomb (for tablets).

Elliott said,
The iPhone 3GS was released 7 months before the Nexus One and it runs iOS 5.

Pretty lame, Google. Pretty lame.

HTC the actual maker of the device deserves some blame too tbh

omgben said,
Could you imagine what the world would be like if Windows dropped support for computers that where over 18 months old?

A better place.

It may not receive an OTA update to 4.0 but it will certainly get a port of 4.0, and thats the beauty of Android, its MASSIVE development community.

You can bet these low specced WP7 devices being released will be absolutely archaic in two years (how old the Nexus One is) and unsupported.

Cash Money Billionaire said,
It may not receive an OTA update to 4.0 but it will certainly get a port of 4.0, and thats the beauty of Android, its MASSIVE development community.

You can bet these low specced WP7 devices being released will be absolutely archaic in two years (how old the Nexus One is) and unsupported.


To be fair, any phone you buy right now will be archaic in two years (GN, Focus S, 4S). Welcome to the wonderful world of fast-paced tech progress.

lordcanti86 said,

To be fair, any phone you buy right now will be archaic in two years (GN, Focus S, 4S). Welcome to the wonderful world of fast-paced tech progress.

I love it! My wallet... not so much. =D

everyone pretty much already knew this. only phones with dual-core processors will be getting ICS as originally speculated. Which means most phones released this year should get it.

Shea J said,
everyone pretty much already knew this. only phones with dual-core processors will be getting ICS as originally speculated. Which means most phones released this year should get it.

Not the case. Sony have already stated that all their 2011 range will be getting ICS and they don't have a dual core phone out yet.

fragmentation FTW! /s maybe if android optimized their OS a lot better this wouldn't be a problem... i feel sorry for the android users out there with decent specced phones who are going to get left out. yeah "we" can update it to 4.0 but normal people won't/can't.

rajputwarrior said,
fragmentation FTW! /s maybe if android optimized their OS a lot better this wouldn't be a problem... i feel sorry for the android users out there with decent specced phones who are going to get left out. yeah "we" can update it to 4.0 but normal people won't/can't.

meh, the whole fragmentation drama is useless already. it was a real problem when you had the older 1.X APIs around. now there's virtually no phone that doesnt support 2.1 at least. aint that what fragmentation was about? developers having it hard to target for wide arrays of devices? or are we whining about older phones not getting the newest OS? and this comes from a current owner of a nexus one.

You still talking fragmentation after I already explained it all out to you. Android 4.0 is iPhone 3G's iOS 5. It can run it probably but should it is the questions, apparently the answer is no!

SHoTTa35 said,
You still talking fragmentation after I already explained it all out to you. Android 4.0 is iPhone 3G's iOS 5. It can run it probably but should it is the questions, apparently the answer is no!

it's a 1ghz phone though with 512 RAM. the 3GS is a 600mhz A8 CPU with 256 RAM. That's a big difference. At least give them the option. that also goes down to my other comment if they optimized their OS better this shouldn't be a problem. and from what i have read on the 3GS and iOS 5, it runs fine.

smooth3006 said,
They will get it just not officially.
Man, Android sure is awesome. Their leading phone is already officially unsupported in two months shy of two years, and it sports Android 2.3.*, after starting at Android 2.1. No fragmentation or reason to fear your phone will be left out to dry on this platform.

Certainly beats those silly Windows Phones and their single cores (1 - 1.4 GHz), and their 512 MB of RAM. And those single core (~800 MHz) iPhone 4's, with their 512 MB of RAM. (It's worth noting that the Nexus One also has 1 GHz single core processor, with 512 MB of RAM.)

I assumed that you would enjoy the satire after you enjoyed posting on the Windows Phone posts to proclaim the awesomeness of Android compared to the rest.

pickypg said,
Man, Android sure is awesome. Their leading phone is already officially unsupported in two months shy of two years, and it sports Android 2.3.*, after starting at Android 2.1. No fragmentation or reason to fear your phone will be left out to dry on this platform.

Certainly beats those silly Windows Phones and their single cores (1 - 1.4 GHz), and their 512 MB of RAM. And those single core (~800 MHz) iPhone 4's, with their 512 MB of RAM. (It's worth noting that the Nexus One also has 1 GHz single core processor, with 512 MB of RAM.)

I assumed that you would enjoy the satire after you enjoyed posting on the Windows Phone posts to proclaim the awesomeness of Android compared to the rest.

I like your style. Mmmm yummy Mango ftw

pickypg said,
Man, Android sure is awesome. Their leading phone is already officially unsupported in two months shy of two years, and it sports Android 2.3.*, after starting at Android 2.1. No fragmentation or reason to fear your phone will be left out to dry on this platform...

iPhone 3G was released July 2008, last updated November 2010. It's not like Apple go significantly above & beyond either now is it?

Besides, CyanogenMod will probably offer it.

Edited by thommcg, Oct 26 2011, 8:36pm :

thommcg said,

iPhone 3G was released July 2008, last updated November 2010. It's not like Apple go significantly above & beyond either now is it?

Besides, CyanogenMod will probably offer it.

But the 3GS was released in June of 09, and it's still getting updates. It will mostly likely be supported up until the launch of the new iPhone next year. 3 years of support for a cellphone ain't bad, but I understand dropping support if the hardware can't handle the new software.

Anyone with a 3GS now and doesn't have some of the features of iOS 5 because it's not good enough is what i'd call fragmentation. iOS 5 if you ask me was only released for the 3GS to use a selling point for the thing as well as get it off crappy iOS 4. The 3G got what, iOS 2 and 3 right? Nothing more? The Nexus One got 2.2 and 2.3 upgrades. I know what you are thinking, 2.2 is just like the 3GS got 4.3 and such. Couldn't be futher from the truth. Point fixes on Apple are mainly adding a new app or "feature" and bug fixes. Point fixes from Android 2.1 - 2.2 to 2.3 is similar to iOS 2.0 to 3.0 to 4.0. iOS 4.3 actually brought in features from Android 2.2.

pickypg said,
Man, Android sure is awesome. Their leading phone is already officially unsupported in two months shy of two years, and it sports Android 2.3.*, after starting at Android 2.1. No fragmentation or reason to fear your phone will be left out to dry on this platform.

Certainly beats those silly Windows Phones and their single cores (1 - 1.4 GHz), and their 512 MB of RAM. And those single core (~800 MHz) iPhone 4's, with their 512 MB of RAM. (It's worth noting that the Nexus One also has 1 GHz single core processor, with 512 MB of RAM.)

I assumed that you would enjoy the satire after you enjoyed posting on the Windows Phone posts to proclaim the awesomeness of Android compared to the rest.


You're missing two key parts of your conversation.
1.) By the time ICS is released, it will be 2 years since the Nexus One was released. Apple is known to cut support at the end of 2 years to force an upgrade (original, 3G). The only reason the 3GS was given iOS 5 was because it's now their entry-level phone. Don't fool yourself if you're thinking otherwise.

2.) Windows Phone 7 hasn't been out long enough to know if MS will support it after 2 years. After 2 years, most people upgrade anyway. Not only that, do you really want the latest OS to be held back by 2+ year old phones?

Trueblue711 said,
do you really want the latest OS to be held back by 2+ year old phones?
I am curious what killer OS feature most people assume exists on phones that cannot be easily supported on older hardware. For the very few features that exist (e.g., multitasking) that cannot keep up on older hardware, then do not support them.

After all, each of the three mobile OSes support features like front facing cameras, but not every supported phone has one. Some features are clearly more "core" than others, but these companies have software engineers capable of designing modularly. I don't expect support to be maintained for much longer than two years, but to say the phone would be holding back the software is a bit of an overstatement. As I'll note later, this is the only place that fragmentation is acceptable. (I had to break up posts because it would simply never post otherwise)

SHoTTa35 said,
Anyone with a 3GS now and doesn't have some of the features of iOS 5 because it's not good enough is what i'd call fragmentation. iOS 5 if you ask me was only released for the 3GS to use a selling point for the thing as well as get it off crappy iOS 4. The 3G got what, iOS 2 and 3 right?
This was a little hard to follow because of all of the different version numbers, but to put things into perspective:

The iPhone 3G made it to iOS 4.2, which means it made it from iPhone OS 2.0 through iOS 4.2. They stealthily killed it as a product without any announcement or fanfare with the release of iOS 4.3 (sometime around March 2011). I think it is absolute crap that Apple did this, particularly because Apple was selling the iPhone 3G as the cheaper alternative to the iPhone 3GS leading up to the iPhone 4's announcement in June 2010, which means people could have effectively had a nine month-old phone that was now officially unsupported.

The iPhone 3GS is still around, and slowly kicking on iOS 5; I am curious when they will kill it off, especially with the news of how well it is "selling" with the free on-contract price. I believe that the iPhone 3GS still has every feature that the iPhone 4 has (not iPhone 4S), but it just runs a bit slower.

You countered your own argument:

SHoTTa35 said,
I know what you are thinking, 2.2 is just like the 3GS got 4.3 and such. Couldn't be futher from the truth. Point fixes on Apple are mainly adding a new app or "feature" and bug fixes. Point fixes from Android 2.1 - 2.2 to 2.3 is similar to iOS 2.0 to 3.0 to 4.0. iOS 4.3 actually brought in features from Android 2.2.
If it brought in "features" from Android 2.2, then it is more than just a point fix/release. As an iPhone 4 owner, I can say that iOS 4.3 did not bring much worth thinking about, and their sub releases (e.g., 4.3.1 and 4.3.2) were vulnerability patches.

SHoTTa35 said,
because it's not good enough is what i'd call fragmentation
What? That is the only reasonable excuse for fragmentation. If my phone is too slow, or otherwise too crappy to handle a feature, then it should not be put on the phone. If it can be supported on my phone, then it should be supported for at least the length of the phone's contract--two years (that includes Apple, Microsoft and Google).

For instance, in iOS 5, the big feature for the iPhone 4S was Siri, which is the voice assistant. It is absolutely bogus that Siri does not run on the iPhone 4 and probably the iPhone 3GS. The "hard" part of the work is done on a server, and not on the phone. It angers me that that type of fragmentation exists, similar to Android simply not getting phone updates. Voice to text for text messaging? Android has done it since--ironically--the Nexus One. Windows Phone 7 has done it since its release, on inferior hardware. Yet, somehow sending recorded voice data to a server can only work on the iPhone 4S?

That's just as bogus as dropping support for Android phones after barely any version support. The difference is that I am willing to admit it's crap and bad fragmentation, even though the jailbreaking community has already managed to get everything aside from communicating with Apple's servers working, just like people will do with ICS for the Nexus One. Jailbreaking and rooting communities are not support. They are just some people doing some cool stuff that you cannot truly depend on because they have other priorities: their own lives.

thommcg said,
iPhone 3G was released July 2008, last updated November 2010. It's not like Apple go significantly above & beyond either now is it?
The iPhone 3G was a different look-and-feel, plus a 3G chip, but otherwise it was practically the same phone internally as the original iPhone. Furthermore, I agree that it's complete crap how Apple discontinued support for it with iOS 4.3, without any mention of it.

pickypg said,
This was a little hard to follow because of all of the different version numbers, but to put things into perspective:

The iPhone 3G made it to iOS 4.2, which means it made it from iPhone OS 2.0 through iOS 4.2. They stealthily killed it as a product without any announcement or fanfare with the release of iOS 4.3 (sometime around March 2011). I think it is absolute crap that Apple did this, particularly because Apple was selling the iPhone 3G as the cheaper alternative to the iPhone 3GS leading up to the iPhone 4's announcement in June 2010, which means people could have effectively had a nine month-old phone that was now officially unsupported.

The iPhone 3GS is still around, and slowly kicking on iOS 5; I am curious when they will kill it off, especially with the news of how well it is "selling" with the free on-contract price. I believe that the iPhone 3GS still has every feature that the iPhone 4 has (not iPhone 4S), but it just runs a bit slower.

You countered your own argument:

If it brought in "features" from Android 2.2, then it is more than just a point fix/release. As an iPhone 4 owner, I can say that iOS 4.3 did not bring much worth thinking about, and their sub releases (e.g., 4.3.1 and 4.3.2) were vulnerability patches.

What? That is the only reasonable excuse for fragmentation. If my phone is too slow, or otherwise too crappy to handle a feature, then it should not be put on the phone. If it can be supported on my phone, then it should be supported for at least the length of the phone's contract--two years (that includes Apple, Microsoft and Google).

For instance, in iOS 5, the big feature for the iPhone 4S was Siri, which is the voice assistant. It is absolutely bogus that Siri does not run on the iPhone 4 and probably the iPhone 3GS. The "hard" part of the work is done on a server, and not on the phone. It angers me that that type of fragmentation exists, similar to Android simply not getting phone updates. Voice to text for text messaging? Android has done it since--ironically--the Nexus One. Windows Phone 7 has done it since its release, on inferior hardware. Yet, somehow sending recorded voice data to a server can only work on the iPhone 4S?

That's just as bogus as dropping support for Android phones after barely any version support. The difference is that I am willing to admit it's crap and bad fragmentation, even though the jailbreaking community has already managed to get everything aside from communicating with Apple's servers working, just like people will do with ICS for the Nexus One. Jailbreaking and rooting communities are not support. They are just some people doing some cool stuff that you cannot truly depend on because they have other priorities: their own lives.

The iPhone 4 is dramatically different to the 3GS, faster processor (not MHz but capability) faster GPU, hi resolution screen, gyroscope, improve camera, more RAM. The 3GS basically had a faster processor and more ram when compared to the 3G.

This time I don't doubt that Siri requires the iPhone 4S due to the processor. Speech recognition is incredibly processor hungry and the level that Siri works at its gonna require a fair bit of processing. If the A4 chip was solely being used for Siri then it would be ok, but running the is and other apps your gonna get a fair bit of slow down on the single core processor.

2xSilverKnight said,
Nexus One is simply to old to have Android 4.0 With a small 512Mb Rom memory, it's simply not enough.

And btw, I said ROM not RAM.

2xSilverKnight said,
Nexus One is simply to old to have Android 4.0 With a small 512Mb Rom memory, it's simply not enough.

Wrong. Sony Ericsson Xperia phones (2011 line) have 320MB RAM and 512MB ROM and will be receiving the ICS update.

Ambroos said,

Wrong. Sony Ericsson Xperia phones (2011 line) have 320MB RAM and 512MB ROM and will be receiving the ICS update.

Why is what he said "WRONG"? Do we know how the Sony Ericsson Xperia phones will run? Do we know what Sony will cut out to make it run? Don't jump the gun telling somebody they are wrong when you don't have answers.

From what I've read, Gabe Cohen's statement was that devices that shipped with Gingerbread would be able to update to ICS. Even if that wasn't the intent, saying that it is theoretically possible doesn't necessarily mean that Google will issue the update anyway. I'd be willing to bet that CyanogenMod will release a version of ICS that works on the older phones though. It will be interesting to see if my G2 gets an update though.

roadwarrior said,
From what I've read, Gabe Cohen's statement was that devices that shipped with Gingerbread would be able to update to ICS. Even if that wasn't the intent, saying that it is theoretically possible doesn't necessarily mean that Google will issue the update anyway. I'd be willing to bet that CyanogenMod will release a version of ICS that works on the older phones though. It will be interesting to see if my G2 gets an update though.

It will

I agree, since it is the "open" os, users should have the choice to upgrade or not. I'm sure it will be ported so not a problem in the end.

ccoltmanm said,
I agree, since it is the "open" os, users should have the choice to upgrade or not. I'm sure it will be ported so not a problem in the end.

Haven't you got to root to put a custom rom on though? Doesn't sound very open to me

ccoltmanm said,
I agree, since it is the "open" os, users should have the choice to upgrade or not. I'm sure it will be ported so not a problem in the end.

"Open" is a buzz word.

DomZ said,

Haven't you got to root to put a custom rom on though? Doesn't sound very open to me

You can thank carriers for most of that. Even with the new Moto RAZR Moto said they will leave it unlocked but then turned around and said they will leave it to the Carriers if it stays that way. VZN already pretty much said yeah sorry bootloader is being locked no fun for you.

DomZ said,

Haven't you got to root to put a custom rom on though? Doesn't sound very open to me

You need ROOT permissions to install anything, be it Linux, Unix, Mac OS X, or Windows ("admin privilage"). Just cause it's a phone doesn't make it magically different.

That said, I gotta click something to install a ROM, so what's one click to root a phone? (eg SuperOneClick, Unrevoked). A standard, Over the Air update even needs a click.

Third: Open as in "you can take android and do what you want with it.". It's kind of like a wall that anyone is free to doodle on (al la NC State University's Freedom Tunnel)... but that doesn't give you keys to the front door or to carve out a quarter of it.

cybertimber2008 said,
You need ROOT permissions to install anything, be it Linux, Unix, Mac OS X, or Windows ("admin privilage"). Just cause it's a phone doesn't make it magically different.

That said, I gotta click something to install a ROM, so what's one click to root a phone? (eg SuperOneClick, Unrevoked). A standard, Over the Air update even needs a click.

Third: Open as in "you can take android and do what you want with it.". It's kind of like a wall that anyone is free to doodle on (al la NC State University's Freedom Tunnel)... but that doesn't give you keys to the front door or to carve out a quarter of it. Android = OS = Open. Device = Notsoopen

DomZ said,

Haven't you got to root to put a custom rom on though? Doesn't sound very open to me

The Nexus One was easily rooted and the bootloader was easily unlocked.

cybertimber2008 said,
You need ROOT permissions to install anything, be it Linux, Unix, Mac OS X, or Windows ("admin privilage"). Just cause it's a phone doesn't make it magically different.

That said, I gotta click something to install a ROM, so what's one click to root a phone? (eg SuperOneClick, Unrevoked). A standard, Over the Air update even needs a click.

Third: Open as in "you can take android and do what you want with it.". It's kind of like a wall that anyone is free to doodle on (al la NC State University's Freedom Tunnel)... but that doesn't give you keys to the front door or to carve out a quarter of it.

1. I don't have to do anything exciting to update the software to the latest version of iOS. I'm not fully clued up on everything Android so I could be wrong, but a quick google seems to suggest rooting can affect your warranty with some carriers/makers, and the following website suggests that unrooting isn't a walk in a park either because of the wide array of devices/builds/techniques floating around for each phone. So my point is it isn't exactly easy for a casual end user to get the latest Android OS:

http://android.appstorm.net/ge...reaking-vs-android-rooting/

2. I can't comment on the "one click" rooting, or if every phone is covered, but the issues I mentioned still apply.

3. One of the reasons I hear people recommending Android is because "it is open" and you can do what you like with it, but you have to root it?! I can do what I like with my iPhone as well if I jailbreak it. Android has it's merits and both OS's have their pro's and cons, and android is certainly more customisable out of the box, but for casual end users they tend to leave the OS as stock anyway (all the non geek friends I know at least), and I think there's a serious issue with the Android OS upgrade policy at the moment

DomZ said,

.....
3. One of the reasons I hear people recommending Android is because "it is open" and you can do what you like with it, but you have to root it?! I can do what I like with my iPhone as well if I jailbreak it. Android has it's merits and both OS's have their pro's and cons, and android is certainly more customisable out of the box, but for casual end users they tend to leave the OS as stock anyway (all the non geek friends I know at least), and I think there's a serious issue with the Android OS upgrade policy at the moment


Actually no, you can't do whatever you like to your iPhone once you've jailbroken it there are large limitations - Rooting is just getting admin access - Unlocking a bootloader is what gives eligible android phones the ability to "whatever"

ccoltmanm said,
I agree, since it is the "open" os, users should have the choice to upgrade or not. I'm sure it will be ported so not a problem in the end.

Sure you can port it, but there won't be enough space for having apps.