Nokia and collaborators to build 5G test network in Finland by early 2015

Although Microsoft acquired Nokia's devices and services division and as a result, thousands of jobs were cut, it seems like the company's networking unit is working soldering on, as Nokia's technical director, Juha Maatta, recently announced their commitment to test a 5G network in Oulu, Finland. Maatta believes the rollout will start by early 2015 if everything goes according to plan.

In terms of speed and coverage, 5G will offer a lot compared to current network solutions. The new standard is expected to improve wireless area capacity by 1,000 and to offer ten to 100 times the current data rate. Energy consumption also plays an important role, with a decrease of 90% in this area is one of the main goals of the 5G standard.

Nokia won't be alone on this journey, as the city of Oulu, the University of Oulu and the Finnish Technical Research Centre will also be participating in the project. The region recently lost some of its appeal as a hub for information and communications technology as Microsoft laid off many employees. In this perspective, the quartet aims to restore the charm of Oulu as an ICT hub.

Nokia also announced it will be sharing its APIs with others, including competitors. This could mean a great amount of openness and collaboration regarding new technologies in the future.

Source: YLE via FierceWireless | Image via Nokia Solutions and Networks

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"it seems like the company's networking unit is working soldering on"

I don't know, but I do not see a correct English sentence here. Also if you mean to say they're soldiering on, that's hardly the case as the unit is an industry leader and in very good shape.

There are various implementations floating about but until there is a real world test, as Nokia are building they will simply be specs. It also means they an make adjustments to improve performance, reduce speed and then test them quickly and easily.

The best I can find is references to experiments with higher radio frequencies, it's not even at a spec stage.

Considering how slow the 4G rollout has been (It hasn't even started in most places), I find it odd that they're starting 5G work without actually seeing how 4G holds up to the network load.

Edit: Ah, I get it now, they're operating on a ~10 year cycle. It took about 10 years for the 4G specs to get nailed down, so they're aiming for 5G to stabilize around ~2020 (And by then we'll have 4G rolled out, hopefully).

I don't know where you live, but in Denmark all Network operators have 4G (TDC, Telia, Telenor). When I was in New York in January, I had 4G as well.

With regards to a specifiction, the closest you get is probably http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/study-groups/rsg5/rwp5d/imt-2020/Pages/default.aspx

You do know that various companies / institutions are constantly working on ways to fit more data over the airways and at some point they will decide that their implementation is the next generation. Nokia is currently doing this and are therefore building a test network to fully test what they've come up with. The term 5G will be awarded to the implementation that comes out on top and is adopted by the leading companies. The actual technology behind them have been worked upon for years and will take a good few years for them to be standardised, approved and agreed upon.

Kenman said,
I don't know where you live, but in Denmark all Network operators have 4G (TDC, Telia, Telenor). When I was in New York in January, I had 4G as well.

With regards to a specifiction, the closest you get is probably http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/study-groups/rsg5/rwp5d/imt-2020/Pages/default.aspx

I'm in Australia, the best we've got is LTE and that only has about 20% penetration.

One of our providers is trialing 4G, but they're only getting about half the expected speed (450Mbps instead of around 1Gbps), and they had to custom build the equipment to get that, because nobody sells it commercially yet apparently.

To be fair, the "4G" in EU is all LTE, but in a bizarre ruling the telecommunications companies were allowed to advertise it as 4G