Nokia explains wireless charging in Nokia 920/820

Nokia is going big with its wireless charging push for its upcoming Windows Phone 8-based smartphones. The Lumia 920 will have such technology built into the phone itself, while the cheaper Lumia 820 can gain that feature via an optional wireless charging shell.

In a new post on the Nokia Conversations blog, the company goes over some of the technical principles behind their wireless charging hardware. It uses a standard called Qi which is backed by the Wireless Power Consortium. The blog states:

A transmitter coil is positioned at the bottom (L1) and the receiver coil (L2) is situated at the top and these coils are embedded into different electrical devices. L1 would be the Nokia Wireless Charging Plate and L2 would be the Nokia Lumia 920, for example. An alternating current in the transmitter coil generates a magnetic field, which includes a voltage in the receiver coil. This voltage is then used to charge up the device.

The Lumia 920 and Lumia 820 will have a number of different wireless charging stations to choose from. Nokia says that it has been making it easier for owners of both smartphones to charge their devices with these plates. The blog states, "Nokia has increased the active charging area to over 80 per cent on the wireless charging plate, meaning you should just be able to put the phone down to charge and not worry about it being ‘spot on’."

Source: Nokia Conversations blog | Image via Nokia

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11 Comments

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When I first heard about the wireless charging, I started thinking Sonicare.

So can someone tell me if the charging mechanism of Nokia Lumia 920 is similar to that of Sonicare toothbrush?

Note that there is popular misconception that Sonicare require metal to metal contact for charging, but that's not the case at all. both charger and toothbrush are watertight sealed, so no metal contacts.

Edited by ThunderRiver, Oct 2 2012, 2:26am :

Same technology. Been around for years. There's been experiments using it with electric cars too (e.g. park you car over a charging mat).

I don't get how this is helpful for a mobile phone. I like having a long charging cable so that I can still use my phone to make calls while it's charging. A cable can also be quickly folded away.

What problem is another device (the charging station) solving? When you travel you need another thing in your bag.

derekaw said,
What problem is another device (the charging station) solving? When you travel you need another thing in your bag.

When you travel you wouldn't take your charging station, you would simply take a USB A -> USB Micro cord.

hurr durr

Fred 69 said,

When you travel you wouldn't take your charging station, you would simply take a USB A -> USB Micro cord.

hurr durr

So what about my other question? If you can do that when you travel why can't you always do that? What problem does this solve?

This will be cool for speakers with NFC pairing. Put the phone down, charges and plays music. No proprietary docks, cables or adapters.

Want to watch a movie? Phone on the set top box and you're away laughing!! No need for AV out + power. Just put it down and GO!

The world is an amazing and exciting place these times gentlemen (and ladies)

Tager said,
I already have a powermat ... wonder if it will work with the 920

it should if the powermat follows the Qi standard, because that's the same standard that the 920 uses. any powermat device using Qi will be compatible with the 920

DARKFiB3R said,
Recently modded my Lumia 800 to have wireless charging

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxgHbBhybYY (not my video)

I am doing this for my S2, it must be done!!

Just wondering, if that's ~$20 in parts I wonder how much I could charge to put that in iPhones. I have some gullible friends who would pay as much as $140 (NZD) for this