Editorial

Nokia is back and ready to kick some ass

Unless you were under a rock the past several weeks, the Lumia 900 made a big splash at CES. Even though it was somewhat expected, the phone was still a huge hit. Don’t believe me? Take a look at all the awards the device won before it even hit the retail channels.

There is something special about Nokia, and it all became rather apparent at CES starting with their keynote. The buzz around what would actually be shown at the 45 minutes presentation was unprecedented, the line for the event rivaled that of Samsung, and for those who don’t understand what that means, Nokia had to turn away individuals from getting into their event. Owen and I had to wait two hours to bring you our liveblog, which we might add was one of our most viewed liveblogs of all time.

But it goes beyond that: Many feel that Nokia is the key to Windows Phone being accepted by the mass consumers, not just the niche user. All of these bets are being placed solely upon the Lumia 900 as it is the new face of Nokia in the US. Yes, we are well aware that the Lumia 710 is also on sale, but let’s face it, we are talking flagship device here…a phone that can finally rival the iPhone on nearly every front and best it in other areas.

There are other great Windows Phone devices on the market too, such as the HTC Titan II, but HTC may have dropped the ball a bit, as the HTC Titan just went on sale and they may have ostracized a big part of their user base like Android currently does with vendors pushing new models every other week.

Nokia is a bit different; they're not just another vendor. They're a company that understands brand experience and carefully crafted the Lumia 900 to fit the US lifestyle. Personally, we thought this was a bunch of BS when we first heard it; but after sitting down with a few folks from Nokia, we understood what they were saying.

First off, they knew LTE was a must and that as an American, we like things big, thus the reason for the larger screen size on the 900, but also gave the choice of the Lumia 710 and Lumia 800. We hope, and effectively communicated to Nokia, that they will not bastardize their brand the way that HTC has done with its seemingly small revisions that make it near impossible to differentiate between their products.

But the Lumia 900 is not what Nokia is trying to sell; they are selling the entire brand with this device. Nokia contends that consumers do not always make a device selection based purely on specs, and that emotions play into the decision. Nokia is saying that they are not just another vendor, but they are THE vendor to have when it comes to Windows Phone. They want to show the world why Nokia is still top dog in the mobile game, and that the North American market should be ready to be graced with the presence of the Lumia family.

For Microsoft, they need the Lumia phones as they are undeniably attractive devices that can pull in the general consumer. Talk to anyone who held the Lumia 900, and none will deny that the device is one of the most well crafted phones for some time. To put it bluntly, it’s the device we need to shakeup the marketplace.

So what am I trying to say? The Lumia 900 will be the device that will separate Microsoft from the pack in the US. While it may be tied to AT&T for a small period of time, if the device hits multiple carriers and stays on top of the game, it will usher in the Windows Phone era. Windows Phone is a unique experience, it steps outside the grid and in a recent event, smoked many other devices on the market.

Even if you are not planning to purchase the Lumia 900, you should be excited. Nokia is a company that can compete head to head with Apple and force other companies to rise to their level. In this competitive atmosphere of smartphones, the consumer is winning and it's all about being not just the best now, but being the best consistently. Can Nokia achieve this? We think so, but they have to prove it and it all starts with the Lumia 900, a phone that is already turning heads. 

As we head into 2012, take note of Nokia and what they are going to bring back to the US market. Not only are they bringing a tremendous product to the store shelves, but their marketing, so far, has been top notch and innovative. Couple good marketing with a great product and Nokia may be flanked by Goose and Maverick as they bring in the rolling thunder. 

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55 Comments

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I resisted to the iPhone craze. Am sure can wait for a Nokia Windows phone to replace the Nokia N8(which still rules in terms of camera supremacy)!

paulheu said,
Android is so 2011

More like 1989...

Every OS from the time frame with the exception of Android has provide key features of memory managment and thread scheduling.

Even Windows 3.x was a more advanced OS model. It supported VM, Dynamic Linkng, and didn't randomly close Applications as the OS needed more RAM.

These core features should be 'required' of a moden OS, but Android don't care, it is the honeybadger of the OS world, and it stinks, and ruinds things, but people love it...

Sorry, but at this point, if it doesn run (or cant run Android) its pretty much pointless (talking worldwide)

htcz said,
Sorry, but at this point, if it doesn run (or cant run Android) its pretty much pointless (talking worldwide)

Why? I mean, iOS seems to be doing fine, and isn't Android.

htcz said,
Sorry, but at this point, if it doesn run (or cant run Android) its pretty much pointless (talking worldwide)

Ya, cause Android is the most brilliant technical marvel ever made.

It was designed by the Gods... oh wait... no...

It was bought by Google patched together to function it was the Dalvik VM was never original designed around or intended.

It uses a rather bad kernel model (yes the Linux one) and it the Dalvik VM offers developer API features that are technically a freaking train wreck.

Android bypass the important Linux kernel features of scheduling and memory managemetn as it would make the OS too large to run, and lets Dalvik has it way with Apps, with the ability to close even the freaking messaging and dialer App if it decides it needs RAM. Of course it will start these crucial Apps, but then decide it needs more RAM and terminate them again, and the cycle repeats.

It is insane the Android isn't just laughed out of the room from a developer and end user perspective.

It hasn't been since the 1980s that users had to worry about saving their work when trying to multi-task, because if the OS runs out of RAM it crashes and/or terminates the previous App you had open.

Android doesn't even handle VM to help with issues like this, as they don't want to ruin the Flash with writes, yet every SSD maker and Microsoft have code that avoids damaging Flash with writes, that Microsoft has been using in Windows Mobile since 2002, that even had freaking VM so that it didn't just randomly terminate programs/Apps.

Android is the OS we use to teach OS Architecture students what to AVOID.


PS Your comment looks excatly like people just 2 years ago, oh that phone doesn't run iOS so don't buy the Android ones.

(Ironically iOS is still the more advanced OS Model than Android, and sadly they both are technically a long way behind WP7.)

thenetavenger said,
Android is the OS we use to teach OS Architecture students what to AVOID.

Nice post here
Do you have sources for that? Not that I don't believe you, I just want to share it

Nokia has set a presedence on their phones for the USA. Anything less than the 710 and 900 would be an insult. Nokia needed to come big and strong and they did.

When the 900 hits AT&T it is going to sell like hotcakes. I am waiting for one to appear on eBay unlocked.

ATT only gets exclsuive sells for a few months, then T-Mobile will also likely get the device, or a slightly improved version. I have the Surround and the Ace would be an awesome upgrade.

TechieXP said,
Nokia has set a presedence on their phones for the USA. Anything less than the 710 and 900 would be an insult. Nokia needed to come big and strong and they did.

When the 900 hits AT&T it is going to sell like hotcakes. I am waiting for one to appear on eBay unlocked.

ATT only gets exclsuive sells for a few months, then T-Mobile will also likely get the device, or a slightly improved version. I have the Surround and the Ace would be an awesome upgrade.

Sad thing is the ATT exclusive angle.

They already have network saturation problems with iPhone users asking their phone to find a fart App digging into Network congestion, and even compared to TMobile, they have far less solid high speed coverage outside of marjor cities.

Verizon is currently the king of good coverage about everywhere, but that is only because they bought out Alltel that saturated rural areas.

Myself, just driving across Interstate 80 in the US, ATT chokes between SF & Sac, again after Sac until Reno, and then a mile or two outside of Reno and doesn't pick up again for about 200 miles in a tiny little town outside the next larger town (which makes no sense)

Verizon, solid 3G this whole route, and they make ATT look like a kind company that cares.

TMobile is almost as good as Verizon, and would rather see them shoving ou the Nokia flagship.

Does Everyone here agree that this is the Windows Phone to get? Last year I heard Wait until Mango, Oh wait until Nokia, wait until.....

I'm getting one to try out but if only the consensus is on a particular phone.

xpclient said,
Doesn't look like an Editorial article to me, more like a free advertisement.

noun
1.
an article in a newspaper or other periodical presenting the opinion of the publisher, editor, or editors.

Cyborg_X said,

noun
1.
an article in a newspaper or other periodical presenting the opinion of the publisher, editor, or editors.

Yet it differs from an ad. 1. A notice or announcement in a public medium promoting a product or service.
2.A person or thing regarded as a means of recommending something.

Kirkburn said,
xpclient, by that interpretation, all positive reviews are ads.

Every review should be balanced and objective. Otherwise yes it's an ad.

It cracks me up that phones for years were getting smaller and smaller, and now we are back to Zack Morris phones, albeit with a pretty touch screen, but I feel like I should start buying stock in laptop bag companies because pretty soon our phones are going to require a bag with shoulder straps, but hey, you will be able to see all those facebook updates on a 21" screen while you talk the phone...

kenboldt said,
It cracks me up that phones for years were getting smaller and smaller, and now we are back to Zack Morris phones, albeit with a pretty touch screen, but I feel like I should start buying stock in laptop bag companies because pretty soon our phones are going to require a bag with shoulder straps, but hey, you will be able to see all those facebook updates on a 21" screen while you talk the phone...

When it comes to technology, smaller is better. When it comes to screens, larger is better. That's a catch-22 for phones!

dagamer34 said,
I'm very interested to see what Nokia has in store for a Windows Phone 8 device.

Me too. They'll have had plenty of lead time to develop something by then. The current devices they put together really quickly...

mr lefleur said,
man i thought the 800 was a beauty but the 900 makes it look like a dumbed/watered down version

Couldnt disagree more. The curved screen on the 800 looks so much better dunno why they made it flat for the 900.
Regardless they are both stunning phones.

mr lefleur said,

Oh ok! wait what?

I read your post and replied to it and then realized that I misread your post then I deleted my post.

sam232 said,

I read your post and replied to it and then realized that I misread your post then I deleted my post.

Oh now I get it, didn't see your first post

the better twin said,

Couldnt disagree more. The curved screen on the 800 looks so much better dunno why they made it flat for the 900.
Regardless they are both stunning phones.

Its actually the flatness I like plus this will go well with Americans since they like everything to be slim

Yeah I am ready to put down money right now for one. I'm done with the old iOS feel. I don't worry much about the apps, because I don't really use that many. I like how the information is the center of the windows phone, not the apps.

One might argue that the Lumia 900 made a big splash at CES whether any of us was under a rock the last several weeks or not.

But anyway, I'm glad to see them getting going in a serious way. The Lumia 800 is sweet and from what I've heard in various phone shops it's selling pretty well.

Indeed! I'm so looking forward to getting me one of these. I'm really hoping that Nokia makes this available world wide.

Take the Limina 900 and throw it out a window. If it survives, it's truly a Nokia phone and well worth owning.

Kushan said,
Take the Limina 900 and throw it out a window. If it survives, it's truly a Nokia phone and well worth owning.

*throws 900 out of second story window*
*goes down and checks it*
*power on*

WORKING

They really need to launch the Nokia 900 globally with a GSM version if it gets any success. Put it simply, it should be as easy as buying an iphone.

What do you mean with GSM version? Nokia is first launching Nokia 900 with AT&T. AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM. It is Verizon and Sprint that use CDMA.

AtriusNY said,
What do you mean with GSM version? Nokia is first launching Nokia 900 with AT&T. AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM. It is Verizon and Sprint that use CDMA.

As in, GSM only version.

AtriusNY said,
What do you mean with GSM version? Nokia is first launching Nokia 900 with AT&T. AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM. It is Verizon and Sprint that use CDMA.

He means GSM frequencies that work across the whole world. For example, my HTC Desire I bought on O2, which uses GSM, couldn't be sold to a friend of mine in the states who uses AT&T simply because it doesn't cover the GSM frequencies that AT&T use.

The Teej said,

He means GSM frequencies that work across the whole world. For example, my HTC Desire I bought on O2, which uses GSM, couldn't be sold to a friend of mine in the states who uses AT&T simply because it doesn't cover the GSM frequencies that AT&T use.

Which is why everything should be a world phone at this point. lol They save money on production costs because they are only producing one...

M_Lyons10 said,

Which is why everything should be a world phone at this point. lol They save money on production costs because they are only producing one...


Not really Nokia's fault lol. Americans like to be different

I do wish the GSM association would just go right everyone has to use this frequency and thats that.

/- Razorfold said,

Not really Nokia's fault lol. Americans like to be different

I do wish the GSM association would just go right everyone has to use this frequency and thats that.

Ironically one of the few 'World' phones is the HTC Trophy that Verizon sells in the US. It has global GSM and their CDMA.

I just want to know when it will be launched in the UK. It's killing me to see so much coverage but the "US only" condition!

spc1972 said,
I just want to know when it will be launched in the UK. It's killing me to see so much coverage but the "US only" condition!
Hey, it's our turn now. Remember that Nokia launched Windows Phone devices in Europe.

I love good competition in the marketplace; I think its great that Nokia is seemingly doing well again and this Lumia 900 appears to be a great device (its probably what I would use if I were to ever switch carriers) but they need more then just 1 intriguing device. I'm interested to see what their next steps will be this year in terms of releasing the next few devices (performance wise and aesthetically)

este said,
I love good competition in the marketplace; I think its great that Nokia is seemingly doing well again and this Lumia 900 appears to be a great device (its probably what I would use if I were to ever switch carriers) but they need more then just 1 intriguing device. I'm interested to see what their next steps will be this year in terms of releasing the next few devices (performance wise and aesthetically)

To be fair, they have 3 - the 710, the 800 and the 900. Granted, they aren't all released in the US just yet (nor in the UK, for that matter), but they still have a decent portfolio. Personally, I see no reason to start ushering out another lot of Windows Phone devices until Apollo comes out - or Tango at the very least. As the article says, we don't want Nokia becoming another HTC where they start to pump out new handsets seemingly every other week. Apple puts out a new handset simply once a year, and that one handset excels throughout that whole year - if Apple can do it, I'm sure others can too.

The Teej said,

To be fair, they have 3 - the 710, the 800 and the 900. Granted, they aren't all released in the US just yet (nor in the UK, for that matter), but they still have a decent portfolio. Personally, I see no reason to start ushering out another lot of Windows Phone devices until Apollo comes out - or Tango at the very least. As the article says, we don't want Nokia becoming another HTC where they start to pump out new handsets seemingly every other week. Apple puts out a new handset simply once a year, and that one handset excels throughout that whole year - if Apple can do it, I'm sure others can too.

Agreed. And I'd say they did very well considering how quickly they were able to get these devices to market...

I understand. But I think the only device I would seriously consider using is the 900. The other 2 devices are just not appealing to me. And I'm sure that goes for others as well....

Rookas said,
I'll probably pick one up. I'm so over iOS.

As of now, I definitely want one. I have a Dell Venue Pro right now and I love it but Dell seems to treat their mobile division like a curiosity (much as they did with the Dell DJ) so not planning to upgrade to another Dell even if they do decide to come back into the market.

I really do hope Nokia also enters the Tablet market with a device that looks like the 900. Saw a mock-up of such a device and I looked perfect.

Rookas said,
I'll probably pick one up. I'm so over iOS.

I've had both the iPhone 3G & 4S and now Android. I've played countless times with a Windows Phone. For content, Windows Phone is definitely lacking but as support grows so will all your major apps and developers. I would definitely recommend Windows Phone over any of the other competitors.

NPGMBR said,
I have a Dell Venue Pro right now and I love it but Dell seems to treat their mobile division like a curiosity (much as they did with the Dell DJ) so not planning to upgrade to another Dell even if they do decide to come back into the market.
Dell seems to see its customers as a curiosity. I am done with Dell as a company until they see major changes in QA and customer service.

I have had both good and bad luck with Dell products, but their customer service is atrocious, and I will not be surprised if Dell is no longer a major brand in ten years.

NPGMBR said,

As of now, I definitely want one. I have a Dell Venue Pro right now and I love it but Dell seems to treat their mobile division like a curiosity (much as they did with the Dell DJ) so not planning to upgrade to another Dell even if they do decide to come back into the market.

I really do hope Nokia also enters the Tablet market with a device that looks like the 900. Saw a mock-up of such a device and I looked perfect.

Now that's an idea. That would be a nice looking tablet. lol