Nokia Lumia 925 on sale in Germany; includes clock on standby screen

Nokia has been cranking out the new Windows Phone-based Lumia smartphones lately, such as the budget priced Lumia 521 from T-Mobile and the high end Lumia 928 from Verizon. Today, the company announced that the latest addition to the family, the Lumia 925, is now on sale for the first time in the world

Nokia's official blog says that residents in Germany are the lucky folks to get the first shot to purchase the Lumia 925. You can check out our recent hands-on preview of the phone, which is based on the Lumia 920 but is much thinner and lighter thanks to its all metal body.

Nokia also announced that the Lumia 925 will be the first of the series to add a clock to the phone's standby screen, apparently at the request of many Lumia users. The clock is part of the Nokia Glance Screen, which will soon be made available for all of the company's Windows Phone 8 smartphones.

Nokia states:

The Nokia Glance Screen also notifies you when your battery level is low, and you can switch on a night mode for reduced glare in the dark. Double tapping the screen will make it easier to unlock the phone, even when the phone is on a wireless charging stand, car holder or on the table.

Nokia has not yet announced when the Lumia 925 will be released in the US but it will be offered by T-Mobile when it is launched.

Look out for our review of the 925 coming shortly right here on Neowin.

Source: Nokia

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I wonder if this means that we will receive the "Amber" update or just the clock functionalities. Does anybody knows?

The biggest problem Nokia seems to have is their inability to create a simple phone model release structure. Apple releases only one phone and they take the market by storm, Nokia releases a million models and they lose market share. I think they need to start learning from this glaringly obvious error in judgment. Performance, design, and consequent experience are only well received if consumers can actually first wade their way through the tech mumbo jumbo to find the phone they want. Right now they have heard that iPhone's, the most ubiquitous single smart phone, are not terrible and are quite simple to choose from - just ask for the latest iPhone. Samsung is actually starting to build the brand familiarity with its Galaxy range.

Iridium said,
The biggest problem Nokia seems to have is their inability to create a simple phone model release structure. Apple releases only one phone and they take the market by storm, Nokia releases a million models and they lose market share. I think they need to start learning from this glaringly obvious error in judgment. Performance, design, and consequent experience are only well received if consumers can actually first wade their way through the tech mumbo jumbo to find the phone they want. Right now they have heard that iPhone's, the most ubiquitous single smart phone, are not terrible and are quite simple to choose from - just ask for the latest iPhone. Samsung is actually starting to build the brand familiarity with its Galaxy range.

Nokia can't just replicate Apple's strategy. Apple was first on the market (in fact they created the mainstream consumer smartphone market) and they were able to gain a large following because of it. Nokia stil has to breakthrough in the smartphone market. Samsung succeeded at this and now their high-end model can achieve similar results as the iPhone.

But dont forget that Samsung also releases a lot of phones (almost 50 different Galaxy phones in 4 years). In my country Samsung is now more popular than Apple (iPhone is now considered a lame business phone). But they became so popular because of models like the Galaxy Y. People entered on the low-end model and many wanted more out of their Phone as they saw their friends upgrade to newer and more expensive models as well.

Nokia is using the same strategy and IMO its the best window into the smartphone market. Because if you want to see failed attempts at the one Phone strategy then simply look at all other Android OEMs. Without the brandpower that Apple has you wont succeed. And unlike Sony, LG and all the others, Nokia is actually building up a brand. For the average consumer the WP tile interface = Nokia and Nokia = unique and has great build quality (at least that is their rep in my country).

Also Nokia doesnt just release a sh*tload of phones. There is intend behind each model. They've split the market in different pricepoints and offer a Phone for each. They started mid to high mid-range 7** and 8**. And now they've added entry and low end (5** and 6**) and high-end 9**. So they offer 5 different of phones for different needs. The 9** series is competing with the iPhone. The others compete in markets that Apple doesnt care for (at this time).

I dont think that Apple created the mainstream comnsumer smartphone market, I actually think that crown belongs quite firmly in Nokias hands. North America was many years behind the rest of the world in this regard, still using pagers when the rest of us were using text messaging. On the point of Nokias release structure, I guess in all honesty im a bit confused. While I understood that the first number was market segment, not realizing there were so many segments, I assumed the latter digits indicated the OS revision.

"Nokia has been cracking out." Don't you mean cranking? The 925 doesnt have an "all aluminium body either.
The 925 looks nice but cant help but wish it came in more colours. The shells are pretty horrific and the anodised band would probably look good in red.

Since the phone case is aluminium they have to anodized it to keep it from scratching easily and this is what gives the color its characteristic metallic sheen. So there are no solid dark colors on aluminium unless it's painted, but paint is nowhere near as durable as anodizing.

Gungel said,
Since the phone case is aluminium they have to anodized it to keep it from scratching easily and this is what gives the color its characteristic metallic sheen. So there are no solid dark colors on aluminium unless it's painted, but paint is nowhere near as durable as anodizing.

Werent the ipods anodised in colours at one point?