Nokia releases new PureView white paper

Nokia made a big splash today with the introduction of the Lumia 920 smartphone. While there were a number of very cool features that were demoed on the Windows Phone 8 device, by far the biggest response was for the PureView photo support.

Today, Nokia also released a new white paper on their PureView efforts, which began earlier this year when the company launched the 41 megapixel 808 PureView, running on Symbian.

The highly technical paper goes over some of the features and hardware that Nokia has put into the camera of the Lumia 920. The paper states:

This time the sensor is purposefully of a lower resolution – 8.7mp, the optics are focused on providing the best possible low light performance in a beautiful product, whilst the image processing capacity will enable in the future new capabilities - that the combination of optics and sensor enable.

The paper includes details of the new image stabilization features in this version of PureView, along with being able to take impressive images in low light conditions. It certainly looked impressive when we saw the examples at the Nokia press conference and it's sure to be one of the biggest selling points, if not the biggest, for the Lumia 920 when it is released.

Source: Nokia PureView white paper | Image via Nokia

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9 Comments

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The most impressive part here I think is physically moving the image sensor to compensate for camera shake, which is just going to give results software just can't match.

~Johnny said,
The most impressive part here I think is physically moving the image sensor to compensate for camera shake, which is just going to give results software just can't match.

This technology is already in cameras. My Sony picture and video camera sensors move to compensate for shake. Indeed the technology is nice.

~Johnny said,
The most impressive part here I think is physically moving the image sensor to compensate for camera shake, which is just going to give results software just can't match.

The low light pictures looked amazing as well. I'm guessing the springs/mechanics they mentioned about allowing the sensor to move is why they had to cut down on the sensors size. The phone is over 1cm thick even without a 41 megapixel sensor.

Once they manage to combine the tech in the 808 with this tech it will be awesome

BillyJack said,

This technology is already in cameras. My Sony picture and video camera sensors move to compensate for shake. Indeed the technology is nice.

I don't think it's ever been done in a camera phone. Instead they use digital stabilisation rather than mechanical, because the camera units are so small in phones the springs would have to be tiny. What Nokia have apparently done is house the entire unit on springs rather than trying to get springs into the unit itself - and they claim that in some of their lab tests doing it this way actually worked better than some of the stabilisation in cameras (not phones).

Be interesting once some tech sites get their hands on one

~Johnny said,
The most impressive part here I think is physically moving the image sensor to compensate for camera shake, which is just going to give results software just can't match.

Sorta reminds me of adaptive optics in big telescopes to keep images sharp and clear... but in a phone. Red one is miiiiiiiiiine.

BillyJack said,

This technology is already in cameras. My Sony picture and video camera sensors move to compensate for shake. Indeed the technology is nice.

Quite - I mean more impressive that they've managed to get his into a camera phone sensor assembly