Nokia Windows Phones unlikely to arrive in US before 2012

The long-awaited unveiling of Nokia’s first Windows Phone handsets will finally come this week at the company’s Nokia World conference in London. But while the marketing push for the new devices has already begun in the UK, it appears unlikely that Nokia’s Mango-powered handsets will launch in the US before 2012.

Leading advertising and marketing publication Ad Age notes that while Nokia has engaged London-based digital agency Inferno to promote its new devices in Europe, it's still shopping around for an agency in the US – specifically in and around San Francisco. The publication confirms that Nokia's US marketing campaign will get under way in 2012, and it's more or less a given that Nokia wouldn't launch its new handsets in the US without a major marketing push to support them.

Details are starting to emerge of what that campaign might look like. The basic concept is called “Amazing Everyday”, which aims to engage buyers with the idea that “hidden away in the everyday landscape are billions of little adventures”.

Ad Age calls this Nokia’s “global creative idea”, so we could see this theme in the company’s Windows Phone campaigns across other markets. It's certainly better than Windows Phone 7's cringe-worthy launch tagline, "Always Delightful... Wonderfully Mine", which was retired very quickly after launch, and thankfully never heard of again.

Nokia has long been heralded as the savior of Windows Phone, which has so far struggled to gain traction in the market. Given that its iOS and Android rivals have recently upped their game with major new OS updates and shiny new hardware, the prospect of a US delay until 2012 for Nokia’s first Windows Phones is not a good one.

One Nokia executive said that “Nokia needs to protect its foothold in Europe before it can even think about other markets”. That’s an understandable position for a company that’s risking everything putting all of its eggs in the Windows Phone basket.

But let’s not kid ourselves, the Windows Phone platform itself doesn’t have much of a foothold to protect yet – and without a more aggressive and immediate marketing and sales push, especially in Microsoft’s home market, the fight to make Windows Phone (and Nokia) relevant to smartphone buyers will only get harder.

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Why is it only Apple can come out with phone and launch it simultaneously on 3 different networks. Yet everyone else can only launch a product one network at a time? Why can't manufactures make one phone that works on both gsm and cdma networks. If apple can do it other should be able to do the same.

The consensus (in the media) seem to think Nokia isn't coming to US until 2012. Seems strange that Microsoft waited to start the US Windows Phone Tour (http://windowsteamblog.com/win...is-coming-to-your-city.aspx) so long after the 7.5 official launch. It just so happens the tour is starting AFTER Nokia World (the day after, in fact). Why? Why not start the tour immediately and kick the whole thing off with the official Mango launch?

So, consider this...

Verizon only has one WP7 phone. No new Verizon WP7 phones have been announced. Kinda strange we haven't heard anything substantive about any new Verizon WP7 phones. Unless Verizon is ditching WP7 as an offering, it seems logical they would have announced their new WP7 phone(s) at (or around the time of) the Mango official launch. If they are going to have a new WP7 why wait so long to announce?

Unless...the US is getting Nokia phone(s) before the holidays. If they were, Microsoft would wait until the Nokia World announcement of their new device(s) so that when the US tour starts, they will be able to showcase their key hardware maker Nokia. Verizon seems the obvious carrier to be launching Nokia in the US due the absence of any Windows Phone information.

I think Nokia is going "all in" and starting in the US. My guess is they are using Apple-like secrecy to make the announcement that much more shocking. If that's the case, the article points out that Nokia is still shopping for an ad agency to market in the US, and if I'm right, they already have one. Most of the media guessing the US will be after Europe lowers expectations, further increasing the "shock-and-awe" effect. The teasers in the UK probably are due to Nokia World being in the UK.

I wouldn't be surprised if when Microsoft said NFC (and maybe even 4G) were coming to Windows Phone "soon", they meant in Nokia's new WP7 phone. Not sometime next year.

smooth3006 said,
Anyone who says android lags has NEVER owned one.

So why do all the ballanced reviewers of technology, always say Android, including IceCream Sandwich, have all got a laggy nature once you have a few apps open.

rxsoob said,

So why do all the ballanced reviewers of technology, always say Android, including IceCream Sandwich, have all got a laggy nature once you have a few apps open.

Ive never seen lag on any ice cream demos.

This is a small set back to the company and to Microsoft in general because with the lack of selection in windows phones it limits the amount of market share that can we eaten or taken from their competitors. Christmas would of been a more keen and strategically better approach for nokia to get the stock up with its amount of sales this year.


And its good to be back at neowin

This is a huge fail. Not that Europe doesnt matter, it does, but if they are going to fight iPhone it needs to happen before x-mas in the USA. Huge fail, unless Microsoft plans to fight it like they did xbox (continue to loose money until its profitable).

Nexus- said,
This is a huge fail. Not that Europe doesnt matter, it does, but if they are going to fight iPhone it needs to happen before x-mas in the USA. Huge fail, unless Microsoft plans to fight it like they did xbox (continue to loose money until its profitable).

Nokia is a complete powerhouse in europe, and almost unknown in the US (or so I am aware). That's why they're delaying the release in the US. They're making a push in their core market first, and then broadening out next year into the place where their market share isn't strong.

Majesticmerc said,
Nokia is a complete powerhouse in europe, and almost unknown in the US (or so I am aware). That's why they're delaying the release in the US. They're making a push in their core market first, and then broadening out next year into the place where their market share isn't strong.
I agree that Nokia is unknown as a smartphone contender in the US, but I think almost everyone has heard of Nokia. My parents old cellphones were Nokia's, and my girlfriend's parents still use Nokia cellphones, and they swear by them.

With practically everyone in America shifting to smart phones these days, throwing a respected brand into the mix is not ever going to be a problem. And it certainly is not a problem before Christmas.

If Nokia waits to launch until after Christmas in the US, then they are flatly making a huge mistake. I have been waiting for their announcement as an unknowing fanboy, but I doubt that I will wait until 2012 for them to release their phone--I will buy something from one of their competitors.

They should sell out in both markets. It will create both hype and demand, just like the Wii. I can understand trying to avoid spreading yourself too thin, but sometimes spreading yourself pretty thin seems to work really well in viral marketing.

Majesticmerc said,

Nokia is a complete powerhouse in europe, and almost unknown in the US (or so I am aware). That's why they're delaying the release in the US. They're making a push in their core market first, and then broadening out next year into the place where their market share isn't strong.

Nokia WAS a powerhouse. MS is keeping them afloat. I'm glad they are not coming to the US until next year. Let the euros test things out before they come here. hopefully by then they will have a better design.

I knew it, they're looking for a marketing push in the US in 2012, thus that means that the first Nokia device will touch US ground in 2012

smooth3006 said,
Ill stick with android thank you!

I didn't recall the news post asking for your personal OS preference.

It's a shame Nokia isn't making more N9 phones with Meego. They look really compelling.

The Engadget review said they preferred Meego to Windows Phone OS. It's strange then that Elop said Nokia wouldn't continue to push Meego even if it's a raging success.

Joey S said,
It's a shame Nokia isn't making more N9 phones with Meego. They look really compelling.

The Engadget review said they preferred Meego to Windows Phone OS. It's strange then that Elop said Nokia wouldn't continue to push Meego even if it's a raging success.

That's because Engadget bitterly hates Microsoft, and WP7 as a result. Meego is filled to the brim with bugs, and it is still only a clone of Android beyond that point, without the app market and tools. It still only supports Portrait mode in most of its apps, which Engadget reasonably slammed Windows Phone for, but, a year later, they give Meego a pass for because... (note: Windows Phone, like iPhone OS before it, has corrected this issue)?

Ignoring that it is a very attractive phone, who the hell wants a clone that doesn't stack up against what it was cloned from? Watch the videos instead of reading the reviews/summary. He notes that he has barely used the phone, and while using it he hits minor bug after minor bug. No serious show stoppers, but then they simply brush them under the carpet and declare it superior to Mango because it looks identical to Android's static list of apps. The only diversion from Android is the idea that it includes some of the Hub-like features of Windows Phone, although not as many.

I can understand people not appreciating the live tile approach of Windows Phone, but I cannot understand portraying a broken Android clone as an amazing revolution. A static list of apps is not impressive, and it is certainly not impressive when it looks exactly like the Android phone you are being compared against, which has been out for months, with the look and feel out long before that. Beyond that, it's a matter of what the apps do, and there was nothing astounding on Meego, and while I like Nokia's Qt API, I do not expect that people would be flocking to write Android app-clones when anyone that likes the phone for more than its looks would simply buy an Android device that does the same plus some, and looks the same in software while doing it.

And that's Meegos problem. Like it? Get an Android. The only differentiation that they could ever offer would be their camera, which Nokia is known for, and and a subset of features. I can see people going for the physical hardware and camera, but I could see a lot more people being told to buy the Android sitting next to it with a close-enough camera and some other woopdy-doo feature (e.g., the new Android-based, Motorola RAZR, which looks very attractive to me and it's extremely thin). Certainly that's what the AT&T rep would say, with the WP7 phones in the back not even updated to Mango, probably sitting next to the Meego that they know next to nothing about (assuming the RAZR is even coming out on AT&T).

WP7 is failing due to the slow push of new handsets... If the US wont get this until 2012 i dont even want to think of when AUS will get it...

I think my guess of Marchish is still pretty valid

Totally agree with everything you said. The only difference I would make is the Bing search app on WP7 is good...Bing itself is not. Mango brings a lot of the missing functionality. I think Microsoft needs to attack where Android and iOS are not. One area would be the Enterprise.
With Microsoft you usually have to wait until version 3 until they get it right. So that would be Windows Phone 8.

As much as I like WP7's interface and smoothness (it really is much better than Android on the same hardware), I just can't make the switch: too many features missing and a forced reliance on Bing, which continues to be much worse than Google for search and maps. While the platforms has other compelling features (Office mobile, development using Visual Studio and C# + WPF) they still don't make up for the loss in functionality. Finally, the fact they are managing the Platform like Apple (marketplace content censorship, 99 usd a year just to develop on one's own phone, no file system access no sideloading and tactics to discourage free apps on market) doesn't do much to endear them to the power user crowd who may otherwise be more inclinedd to give them a chance

forced reliance on Bing

There's quite a few Google based applications in the marketplace and in Mango IE's search can be changed to Google

99 usd a year just to develop on one's own phone

If you're a student (or know someone who is) you can waive the 99usd a year fee. Or you can wait for the Chevron Labs unlock which is going to be 9usd.

Alternatively, theres a ton of guides on XDA on how to unlock your phone.

kaworu1986 said,
As much as I like WP7's interface and smoothness (it really is much better than Android on the same hardware), I just can't make the switch: too many features missing and a forced reliance on Bing, which continues to be much worse than Google for search and maps. While the platforms has other compelling features (Office mobile, development using Visual Studio and C# + WPF) they still don't make up for the loss in functionality. Finally, the fact they are managing the Platform like Apple (marketplace content censorship, 99 usd a year just to develop on one's own phone, no file system access no sideloading and tactics to discourage free apps on market) doesn't do much to endear them to the power user crowd who may otherwise be more inclinedd to give them a chance

WP's IDE alone is enough for me to ditch the nasty Java on Google's IDE front (if they even have any).

kaworu1986 said,
As much as I like WP7's interface and smoothness (it really is much better than Android on the same hardware)

That may have been the case on older Android phones which had multitasking and WP7 didn't, but on ICS phones like the Galaxy Nexus or the Galaxy S II, the interface is smooth as butter even with intensive multitasking.

The truth is WP7 just doesn't do a lot. That's why it might appear comparatively to run smoother on a single core.

kaworu1986 said,

I just can't make the switch: too many features missing and a forced reliance on Bing, which continues to be much worse than Google for search and maps.

I agree with this assessment. I'd also add poor application quality and availability to that list. Not to mention the unattractive and difficult to use front screen. I much prefer to have multiple home screens. It's just seems more intuitive to me.

kaworu1986 said,

While the platforms has other compelling features (Office mobile, development using Visual Studio and C# + WPF)

That's the thing though, dotnet and Visual Studio aren't compelling because of their poor cross platform support. Using dotnet's also runs the risk of patent lawsuits from Microsoft in the future. Especially against GNU/Linux and other non-Microsoft implementations.

Java is better supported every platform and has more developers.

Joey S said,

That's the thing though, dotnet and Visual Studio aren't compelling because of their poor cross platform support. Using dotnet's also runs the risk of patent lawsuits from Microsoft in the future. Especially against GNU/Linux and other non-Microsoft implementations.

Java is better supported every platform and has more developers.


Plewase stop spreading this ignorant FUD.
C# and CLI are ECMA and ISO standards. Microsoft officially promised in a legal document they won't sue anyone for implementing .Net APIs.
Silverlight is officially supported on Windows, Mac OS, Windows Phone. On Linux iy's supported by Microsoft-endorsed Moonlight.

Also MS doesn't have any ability to sue for wrighting programs using .Net. It's nonsense!

If you think that MS will sue it's own WP7 developers over using Microsoft-provided Silverlight for wrighting WP& appsm you are clearly delusional.

On the other hand we have Google, being sued for stealing Oracle's Java for its Android.

Galaxy Nexus or the Galaxy S II, the interface is smooth as butter even with intensive multitasking.

Is that why the Galaxy Nexus had subtle bits of lag?

Not to mention the unattractive and difficult to use front screen.

LOLOLOLOLOLOL
Oh god "click pin to home screen"

God that **** is so difficult

Joey S your trolling gets more hilarious as the days go by.

kaworu1986 said,
As much as I like WP7's interface and smoothness (it really is much better than Android on the same hardware), I just can't make the switch: too many features missing and a forced reliance on Bing, which continues to be much worse than Google for search and maps. While the platforms has other compelling features (Office mobile, development using Visual Studio and C# + WPF) they still don't make up for the loss in functionality. Finally, the fact they are managing the Platform like Apple (marketplace content censorship, 99 usd a year just to develop on one's own phone, no file system access no sideloading and tactics to discourage free apps on market) doesn't do much to endear them to the power user crowd who may otherwise be more inclinedd to give them a chance
There is a Microsoft supported project to actually encourage advanced users to sideload applications. It is a strangely good thing to limit this to advanced users that actively want to do it.

This will help to avoid viruses and malware issues down the road, which Android is currently mocked for. However, it will also help to create the jailbreaking community that is vibrant within the iOS community.

There are very few legitimate needs for raw file system access on a phone as a developer. As a user, the only reason that I can see for accessing the file system is using the phone as a storage device, which apps exist to work around (they use their own sandbox space to write files).

Joey S said,
That's the thing though, dotnet and Visual Studio aren't compelling because of their poor cross platform support. Using dotnet's also runs the risk of patent lawsuits from Microsoft in the future. Especially against GNU/Linux and other non-Microsoft implementations.
Java is better supported every platform and has more developers.

The reason that you are arguing to use Android is a point against it. The development API for Android abuses Java in a non-transferable way. You can bring in most existing libraries, but Google makes no claim that what works on Android will work on an ordinary JVM--certainly the API will not. But even the Java calls are potentially different. Just look at their API differences under the java.* packages, which do not, or did not match Java 6 (December 2006) or even Java 7 (new this summer). It's not just a subset. It's different. This is one of the many reasons that Oracle wants to sue Google, and frankly it's the most reasonable one.

Conversely, the Windows Phone API is [unfortunately] a subset of Silverlight 5 (4? I cannot quite remember) with Mango. What works there will almost certainly work in the browser, and in a Siverlight application on Windows or Mac. It may be a matter of changing your XAML, but this is a trivial change compared to swapping out an entire UI layer, or even API.

I say it's unfortunate because I fully believe that the hardware could support the entire Silverlight engine, and it would certainly make development that much easier because if you see it on MSDN, then you would be good-to-go. Still, good luck finding a similarly detailed API specification for Android--nothing competes with MSDN in terms of useful documentation. There are JavaDocs available for Android, but the description is simply not reasonably comparable.

Getting to the "issue" with mutliplatform problems with .NET. If you use Silverlight, then you are going to reach 99% of your market--Mac and Windows. If you want to use raw .NET, then you can develop against Mono, which is a seriously good alternative to .NET for platforms other than Windows, including Linux (Moonlight is not so hot as a replacement for Silverlight on Linux though, as it only supports up to Silverlight 2.0). If you are seriously developing a mobile application, and you are worried about multiplatform code, then you are not going to benefit anymore between Android or Windows Phone. Neither one provides runnable code for the other two platforms (iOS and whatever the other platform is). You can do native code on Android, but good luck getting a serious benefit out of that except internal library code; chances are that the pure Java code will work, but there is no guarantee. If that's what is stopping you from developing for Windows Phone, then keep lying to yourself.

The real reason to choose Android over WP7 is the marketshare. That sucks, but so does fragmentation of Android. Phones getting released months ago (Verizon Thunderbolt anyone? They just pulled the Android 2.3 release after it barely met its own release deadline at the end of September) will never see Ice Cream Sandwich, so you cannot really use many of those features and expect to monetize them. It's there. It's reality, but if you want more people than you are going to develop for that first--even with those issues. But not before you develop for iOS, which has next to no multiplatform support. The code can probably be cross compiled to other platforms as native code (possibly reusable in Android if you're careful), but not many people are doing it. You can get your internal library written as native code, and maybe reuse it in Android (probably written in C or C++ and not Objective-C), or more likely, directly for Mac OS X.

pickypg said,
There are very few legitimate needs for raw file system access on a phone as a developer. As a user, the only reason that I can see for accessing the file system is using the phone as a storage device, which apps exist to work around (they use their own sandbox space to write files).

I would say the main need for file system access is to be able to load media on the device without being locked into a particular device management application, which is just one more case of vendor lock-in. Right now there is no easy way to load media on an iOS or WP7 device from Linux simply because iTunes and Zune do not (and most likely never will) have a Linux version.

kaworu1986 said,
I would say the main need for file system access is to be able to load media on the device without being locked into a particular device management application, which is just one more case of vendor lock-in. Right now there is no easy way to load media on an iOS or WP7 device from Linux simply because iTunes and Zune do not (and most likely never will) have a Linux version.
I can agree with that, but I gave that control up when I got rid of my Creative MP3 player in favor of an iPod nano (original), and now a Zune HD.

For advanced users--specifically Linux users--I can see the desire. In the major cases though, it's just a matter of changing a registry key or setting (OS X), and then knowing the file structure. I am personally not sure how to do it in Linux because I've never used Linux to manage either, but I bet it's pretty easy for an advanced user. And frankly, that's a sacrifice that I am willing to make to stop people from getting me to help them when they corrupt their device because they destroyed their file tree (speaking from experience with a friend and their iPod).

I used to use my nano as a poor man's flash drive (it was 8 GB!!), which is why I know about it, and early in the day's of WP7 "hacking," the registry-find was discovered. I think they even showed it off on Neowin.

http://www.neowin.net/news/too...ble-usb-mass-storage-on-wp7

Just use the .NET Reflector to see what registry keys are set if you are curious (or search somewhere else; I thought Neowin posted the keys directly, but that link was the first hit).