Norton 2013 public beta supports Windows 8, Metro UI

If you are running the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, you can now download and try out free beta versions of three Symantec Norton security products. Betanews.com reports that the 2013 public betas versions of Norton Antivirus, Norton Internet Security and Norton 360 have been released and can be downloaded at Symantec's website.

Users of Windows 8 will be able to check out Metro versions of all three programs, with a new interface that supports touch screens, along with hardware acceleration. Norton Antivirus 2013 also apparently works with Microsoft's previously announced anti-malware measures; this means the software will launch earlier in the boot process for a Windows 8 PC, so that it can help find any embedded malware or rootkits that could be installed on the machine.

There has been some speculation that there was no need for a Windows 8 Metro app for antivirus makers. Indeed, one of the leading free antivirus companies, Avast, has said that it won't be making a Windows 8 Metro version of its popular software. The fact that Symatec is offering exactly that kind of support for Norton Antivirus 2013 means that at least some security software companies see the need for a product that supports the Metro UI.

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36 Comments

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butilikethecookie said,
Why not just use the built in one? Norton is the crappiest AV I have ever used in my damn life.

Yoo hoo. It's 2012 now. Stop posting like it's 2005.

I think that they might have some kind of cloud service running where the scatual desktop version of the software communicates to the cloud and the Metro interface will communicate with the cloud and get information on the account established. That is the only way I can see them doing it.

I just came from a MS sponsored presentation on the impact of Metro app development and so far they have stated flat out that no Metro style app made by developers will offically be able to communicate with software on the desktop. The only way to get Metro app on the PC is via the store or if you have set your PC up as a development box. Of couse developers can do some crafty things, but normal users will not beable to do these things. If this changes it breaks the security sandbox that MS is trying to creat, which I think I can agree with after considering it's place in the windows OS. Metro apps are meant to be selfcontained or cloud serviced apps. It is their unified answer to iOS style apps and Chrome apps on the desktop PC and every where else. It is bold, but I think it could work once everyone one understands the purpose and not try to make it what it is not. It would also not hurt if MS did not make the desktopo out to be legacy platform... they should also consider developing an infrastructure to distribute desktop apps as an option too. Apple has already did that, it is a shame that they will be left behind... it would give mainstream users a much better experience and improve the health of the OS from uninstall garbage. Ah well...


I don't like what Microsoft has done with the Win8 vocabulary.
A "Metro" app can be either a WinRT app, or a desktop app inspired by the Metro design language

Aethec said,
I don't like what Microsoft has done with the Win8 vocabulary.
A "Metro" app can be either a WinRT app, or a desktop app inspired by the Metro design language

WinRT apps are called METRO-STYLE apps while desktop apps with the metro UI is called METRO apps. But, it is far easier to just refer apps as either WinRT apps or Desktop apps. No confusion there.

ahhell said,
Just use Security Essentials and ignore this Norton ****.
Why people don't, blows my mind.

Windows 8 has security essentials built in (renamed to Windows devender). Yes, Windows Defender in Windows 8 is a full fledged antivirus program. In fact you can't install security essentials on Windows 8.

I thought metro style apps only can be installed from the Windows Store (except web browsers). How does Norton be able to distribute a metro-style app bypassing the Windows Store???

Nazmus Shakib Khandaker said,
I thought metro style apps only can be installed from the Windows Store (except web browsers). How does Norton be able to distribute a metro-style app bypassing the Windows Store???

Because it's probably just a regular win32 fullscreen app. Not a winRT app.

Nazmus Shakib Khandaker said,
I thought metro style apps only can be installed from the Windows Store (except web browsers). How does Norton be able to distribute a metro-style app bypassing the Windows Store???

A lot of companies have been asking for a way to install a Metro version of their app alongside a desktop version. So I would imagine Microsoft is looking at a way to allow this.

jimmyfal said,
Nice, now all we have to do is right click and uninstall. Are they releasing a Metro Norton Removal Tool also?

No but they have Norton sucker app for the clueless.

Melfster said,

No but they have Norton sucker app for the clueless.

No, clueless is when you think Norton is bad (or still bad).
Truth is it's one of the best malware protection apps out there.

PmRd said,
How would that even work. Windows 8 apps are sandboxed

They might have special access from MS (Like you can get on WP7), the app may also simply be a front end for a more traditional AV app that runs in the background, may that uses a webserver type service to communicate with the app

PmRd said,
How would that even work. Windows 8 apps are sandboxed
All apps? I find this hard to believe, documentation?

Sraf said,

the app may also simply be a front end for a more traditional AV app that runs in the background, may that uses a webserver type service to communicate with the app

Most likely.

DerekMorgan said,
All apps? I find this hard to believe, documentation?

WinRT apps are sandboxed in a similar way to how WP7 apps are

DerekMorgan said,
All apps? I find this hard to believe, documentation?

Yes all WinRT apps made by people other than MS

PmRd said,
How would that even work. Windows 8 apps are sandboxed

That is what WCF is for. While you usually set it up to talk to a server as a web service, you can also talk to a service hosted in a desktop app or a system service. You write a WCF service that is hosted in a system service, and have the Metro app talk to that service to get data from the scanner system service. There was a change in Win8 for security reasons that disallows talking to a WCF service on the local machine, but that can be worked around by a command line batch file.

The only problem I can see is installing the Metro app outside of the store. Win8 Enterprise allows sideloading, but they may be able to get Microsoft to sign the app, which may allow them to install outside of the store.

Sraf said,

They might have special access from MS (Like you can get on WP7), the app may also simply be a front end for a more traditional AV app that runs in the background, may that uses a webserver type service to communicate with the app

Metro apps can't communicate with win32 apps running on the same machine

The winrt sandbox blocks interprocess communication, including HTTP and sockets for security reasons.

Obviously Norton 2013 doesn't include a metro app. It includes a fullscreen Win32 UI that looks like a metro apps. But it is running on the classic desktop and will be available to xp/vista/7 users.

I guess tech journalists can't tell the difference between a metro app and a metro UI ...

link8506 said,

Obviously Norton 2013 doesn't include a metro app. It includes a fullscreen Win32 UI that looks like a metro apps. But it is running on the classic desktop and will be available to xp/vista/7 users.

I guess tech journalists can't tell the difference between a metro app and a metro UI ...

It doesn't look much a Metro-style app to me, apart from having huge fonts and hit targets for touch users. It's also not full-screen.

dvb2000 said,
Who cares, Nortons should be dead and buried. Hopefully Microsoft will include MSE in the base install.

Have you been living under a rock since Windows 8 was announced? They already did "include MSE in the base install". It was integrated into Windows Defender which is included out of the box in Windows 8.

PmRd said,
How would that even work. Windows 8 apps are sandboxed

I imagine there's gotta be a way... Metro apps have access to the file system I"m sure. I haven't played around with Metro apps yet, but don't imagine you wouldn't be able to share a database or flat files, etc.

dvb2000 said,
Who cares, Nortons should be dead and buried. Hopefully Microsoft will include MSE in the base install.

Lot of ignorance in these threads. Symantec's A/V is one the best of the best, and much better than MSE.

I have 4TB of storage on my PC. Norton scans it all in about 6 hours. It takes MSE nearly a day and a half, even with it sucking up more CPU cycles to do it. You can't pause MSE either if you need to do something critical.

PeterTHX said,
Symantec's A/V is one the best of the best, and much better than MSE.

Lots of suckers who fork out money for stuff they don't need. Norton blows and I'd never buy it again.

dvb2000 said,

Lots of suckers who fork out money for stuff they don't need. Norton blows and I'd never buy it again.

People who actually use the product, as well as respected web/print publications, have been giving Norton A/V high marks for the last few years. No matter how much you want to pretend it stinks it simply doesn't and provides a much better protection level than most "free" A/V products out there.

I ask this: why does it "suck"? Put up or shut up.