NTT DoCoMo cancels plan to carry Samsung's Tizen smartphone

Japanese carrier, NTT DoCoMo, was slated to launch a Tizen-based smartphone from Samsung in the coming months but has now shelved the plans citing lack of interest.

So Hiroki, a spokesman for DoCoMo, said that, "The market is not big enough to support three operating systems at this time." Research by IDC Japan showed that the smartphone market in the country grew by just 2.2 percent YoY during the period April-September which convinced DoCoMo to cancel the launch of the Tizen device. Japanese market is currently dominated by iOS and Android devices, but the slow growth may not be enough to support a third operating system successfully.

The latest setback is one of the bigger ones as DoCoMo itself had announced intentions to launch the Tizen-based device.

Tizen OS has been having a rough time ever since its inception as Intel's Moblin OS for netbooks and tablets. Intel later collaborated with Nokia to develop it for smartphones under the MeeGo name before Nokia dropped out of development after releasing the Nokia N9. Samsung, the latest company to back the project, is aiming to bring the Tizen OS as an alternative to Android and dropped the Bada OS in its favour. Many rumours have surfaced about Tizen devices launching over the past few months but none have been proved right yet.

According to WSJ, we can expect Samsung to showcase Tizen-based devices at the upcoming Mobile World Congress 2014 in February at Barcelona. 

Source: WSJ | Image via Tizen

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Intel to cut its workforce by five percent by end of 2014

Next Story

Giveaway: Fitbug Orb [Update with Winner]

19 Comments

Enron said,
I'd like for there to be an "open" OS like Android but not tied to an advertising and data mining company.

Can I ask why?

I'd like if I could install any OS I might like on a handset, given driver support. I mean, I'd actually pay full price for Windows Phone, for example, to install on Xperia that originally sports Android. And do a Hackiphone just for kicks. And it's not even mutually exclusive with their cr-app store monetization policies. Oh... no, it somewhat is, actually.

Phouchg said,
I'd like if I could install any OS I might like on a handset, given driver support. I mean, I'd actually pay full price for Windows Phone, for example, to install on Xperia that originally sports Android. And do a Hackiphone just for kicks. And it's not even mutually exclusive with their cr-app store monetization policies. Oh... no, it somewhat is, actually.

You and 10 other people.

Enron said,
I'd like for there to be an "open" OS like Android but not tied to an advertising and data mining company.

The os has nothing to do with advertising, if you download the android source and compile it there won't be any google services, those are added by the manufacturer
So if you want android without google services, install a aosp rom or any other rom and don't install the google services.

Any smartphone os has search engine services built in, if it's tizen, android, whatever the manufacturer adds it because the customers expect it (play store etc).

I look forward to reading the book that will inevitably be written about the life of that code base and the groups that have picked it up just to eventually drop it.

Unless the book suffers the same fate.

The key thing to note in the quote is "at this time". Samsung is big enough to make Tizen the third horse in the smartphone race on their own and probably propel it to 20% in a year or two. Heck, Bada was only ever released in South Korea, and it still dwarfed WP for a long time, even after Samsung declared they were dropping support for it.

Once Tizen gets big enough globally, DoCoMo will be begging to get a piece of the action. Tizen is also the reason why Samsung will gladly take the billion dollars from microsoft and do jack with it.

recursive said,
it still dwarfed WP for a long time,

That's a bit extreme. It maxed at 2,7% marketshare. Granted it wasn't available everywhere around the world and could have had 4% (estimate) if it sold equally well in the US but that in no way dwarves WP. Also don't forget that this was in a different time. The market wasn't saturated, the brands were less established.

It failed because there were almost no apps compared to android, the devices were crappy and had the same or even higher pricetag then a similair android device...

SharpGreen said,
Intel didn't make Maemo, and had nothing to do with Maemo. Intel's first mobile OS was Moblin.

Maemo was Nokia's version that was rolled into MeeGo with Intel's Moblin.

Tizen can and likely will completely replace Android and might be able to run all Android apps - funny enough, it might run them faster than Android itself. So Tizen won't be a 3rd OS it will simply take over from and replace Android.

What's really funny is that Google argue the ability to run Android apps (through alien dalvik) is illegal. Yet Google is contradicting themselves 100% on exactly the same issue in the appellate court in California (Oracle vs Google) where they argue they should be legally able to run Java under identical conditions.

If Google win in California they won't be able to argue that Tizen shouldn't run Android apps, Samsung will build Tizen and it's goodnight Android. If Oracle win in California, Google will have to pay license fees to Oracle for every unit of Android shipped (possibly retroactively including every unit of Android shipped to date). Add this to the fees manufacturers already pay to Microsoft, Nokia and Apple and it's goodnight Android.

Not well played by Google. They're caught in their own trap. Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of guys.

Major_Plonquer said,
Tizen can and likely will completely replace Android and might be able to run all Android apps - funny enough, it might run them faster than Android itself. So Tizen won't be a 3rd OS it will simply take over from and replace Android.

What's really funny is that Google argue the ability to run Android apps (through alien dalvik) is illegal. Yet Google is contradicting themselves 100% on exactly the same issue in the appellate court in California (Oracle vs Google) where they argue they should be legally able to run Java under identical conditions.

If Google win in California they won't be able to argue that Tizen shouldn't run Android apps, Samsung will build Tizen and it's goodnight Android. If Oracle win in California, Google will have to pay license fees to Oracle for every unit of Android shipped (possibly retroactively including every unit of Android shipped to date). Add this to the fees manufacturers already pay to Microsoft, Nokia and Apple and it's goodnight Android.

Not well played by Google. They're caught in their own trap. Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of guys.

The only thing not legal is running Google's 1st party apps without their permission.

Commenting is disabled on this article.