NVIDIA backs Windows RT, multiple tablets coming

NVIDIA has put their support behind Microsoft's fledgling ARM-based edition of Windows, Windows RT, saying that the platform "is where things are going". NVIDIA vice president of computing products, Rene Haas, told Computerworld that NVIDIA is "very invested and very committed to Windows RT", also adding that it has a "bright future", despite numerous OEMs getting cold feet about producing ARM-based Windows devices.

Haas highlighted how Windows RT machines tend to have longer battery lives and smaller form factors than their fully-fledged Windows 8 brothers, and mentioned how Tegra 4 chipsets will feature in "multiple" upcoming Windows RT products. His comments are complemented by those of Qualcomm, another ARM chip manufacturer who is excited about the future of Windows RT.

When asked about Windows RT's lackluster market entrance - the platform accounted for just 0.4% of tablet shipments in Q1 2013 - Haas said "we're not discouraged by the start and very, very excited going forward." He goes on to say it's early days in a "very significant transition" for the PC market, and that in the future ARM will be the dominant force in tablets due to an energy efficient design.

Echoing the words of many other executives and analysts, to help improve sales of Windows RT and Windows 8 NVIDIA believes that Microsoft should continue to expand the app offerings available in the Windows Store. While the Store is seeing growth at the moment, "the faster that growth continues, the better for the overall platform", Haas said.

Despite NVIDIA's investment in Windows RT and belief that it will eventually be the dominant force in the tablet space, Intel is pushing hard with their line of x86-based chips that can run Windows 8 and 'legacy' apps. Haswell will bring significant graphics improvements and moderate power savings to the higher-end line of Intel-based machines, while Bay Trail will continue to see optimizations to reach the all-important 10-hour battery life mark.

Source: Computerworld

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

'Computer' renamed to 'This PC' in latest Windows 8.1 build

Next Story

Why don't Nokia's Asha phones run Windows Phone? Stephen Elop explains

11 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

The way I see it ARM will compete with Intel and that's a good thing for consumer. Without RT, I don't think Intel will lift an arm to make Haswell better. Atom is just one of Intel answer for better battery but seriously it still is underpowered. ARM has potential from window 8 on ward. I think with window 10 or 20 down the road, ARM's app will be backward compatible.

I can imagine replacing nexus or iPad OS'es and install window RT (if MS released it of course) and make it windows tablet.

I say grab popcorn and watch those 2 fight it out.

I completely agree with him. I hold my own Surface RT and really appreciate it. The Windows Store has enough apps for lot of usages even if it's good to see it growing. So, I think lot of the people bashing RT, Surface and Windows Store, never really hold and used it, and just repeat what they read. Ok it's an expensive device but it's a really good built device...

But now, I'm asking me what NVIDIA is really doing to promote it? They released an app, sort of NVIDIA based news center... But that's all. They should better promote CPU/GPU capacities with demo or graphic manipulations apps... They don't even have a dedicated Surface/Tegra site...
But ok, it's good to tell journalists how good can be their platform.

I highly doubt that RT will make any penetration on the market. Windows users want full version of Windows with decades of supporting apps...not this RT toy.

Yogurth said,
I highly doubt that RT will make any penetration on the market. Windows users want full version of Windows with decades of supporting apps...not this RT toy.

people willing to buy an android tablet will be well suited to RT (same for iPads), after all, that's what RT is competing with, not x86 based laptops/pcs/tablets.

your thinking about it wrong.

example, I'm running w8 on my desktop and laptop, no iPad/android tab could replace these for me, they stay in sync and save all my preferences to the cloud not to mention have brilliant skydrive integration. Whenever i reinstall or get another device all my settings follow, along with being able to install all store apps I've bought on one of my devices on all of them.
now if i wanted a tablet (and do soon) i will choose an rt device, simply because all my settings follow simply by logging on and i can install and use all the apps ive paid for once on one of my devices.

this is a big deal to me, same password, same desktop, same apps, same preferences, email automatically setup, constant sync on all devices with no setup (other than logging in), and i get the arm benefits of long battery life.

this is where w8 shines, and most people simply don't realise it, no more fragmented app stores (apps on your iPad, some on pc, some on phone etc.), the three screens is coming to fruition.

Edited by duddit2, May 10 2013, 7:10am :

They always conveniently forget to mention Atom tablets which get the same battery life and focus on Core machines. Bay Trail makes the case for RT on anything bigger than a 7" hard to make no matter the performance gains on new tegra and Qualcomm chips, as they still don't address the key limitation, x86 program compatibility. I think the road ahead for RT is still going to be a hard one.

Maybe they'll do a better job with RT when 8.1 comes out as far as letting people know that while it does look the same it's really not the same as 8.1 on x86.

Hell, the best thing they can do is not have the desktop on any 7-8" tablets unless they're x86. Most of the confusion will probably go away if users can't even access the desktop and think they can install their older apps on it.

I don't get this why sacrifice the excellent management tools like local group policy, PowerShell etc that set windows rt apart from its computers just to satisfy the "too much choice my head hurt" crowd.

Turning RT into another dumb unmanageable tablet os would kill the advantage Microsoft has with RT.

Exactly. If you really don't want the desktop on a 7" tablet put Windows Phone OS on it. If RT lost the desktop I'll be very angry. I want RT to become more full Windows 8 like in the future (more desktop apps, AD join ability, etc), not more dumbed down.

Oh, and why do people keep referring to desktop apps as "legacy" apps. If even one desktop app has been released since Windows 8 came out then it ins't legacy. Oh, Office 2013 must be a legacy app. Hmm...

TPreston said,
I don't get this why sacrifice the excellent management tools like local group policy, PowerShell etc that set windows rt apart from its computers just to satisfy the "too much choice my head hurt" crowd.

Turning RT into another dumb unmanageable tablet os would kill the advantage Microsoft has with RT.

Those things are still there, but hidden. Not everyone buying a RT tablet, specially a future 7" one needs the desktop. If anything MS is cutting down the need to go to the desktop to manage things more and more with 8.1. Look at all the stuff added to the metro control panel in 8.1 so far, look at the metro version of file manager and other apps being added.

If you want RT with the desktop then that's probably best on a 10" device, if a OEM is going to sell a pure consumption device which is typically what the 7" market is made of, then the desktop isn't needed. I also don't expect to see Office coming on any future 7" devices either like it does on the Surface RT today.