NVIDIA claims new GTX 800M mobile GPUs offer much better battery life for gaming

PC gamers who owns notebooks know that when the power cord is no longer connected, it sometimes can take an hour, or even less, to drain its battery due to the amount of CPU and GPU activity when playing many games. Today, NVIDIA claims that their new family of GTX 800M mobile GPUs will help solve that issue with a feature called Battery Boost.

The company claims that people who own notebooks with a member of the GTX 800M series inside will notice the effects immediately. NVIDIA says:

To achieve this feat Battery Boost adjusts the power needs of the GPU, CPU, and memory automatically to deliver a user-targeted frame rate (30 FPS by default). Each notebook component is adjusted in real-time, maximizing efficiency, and ensuring buttery smooth gameplay, even when the action heats up during high-intensity moments.

Of course, the GTX 800M chips are faster than previous NVIDIA mobile graphics processors. The company estimates that the 800M series have between 15 and 60 percent better performance. The chips have also been designed to be thinner and lighter, which will also make notebooks smaller. The GTX 800M series will be inside a number of gaming notebooks later this spring, including Razer's new Blade laptops.

Source: NVIDIA | Image via NVIDIA

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18 Comments

FalseAgent said,
a) Intel's graphics are pretty decent these days.
b) I hope you aren't thinking of seriously gaming on a surface.

a) define decent.
b) graphic intense softwares are as heavy as games, Autocad, 3DMax, 3D game development softwares.

trojan_market said,

a) define decent.
b) graphic intense softwares are as heavy as games, Autocad, 3DMax, 3D game development softwares.

i know surface pros are nice tablets/laptop replacements, but tbh if you need decent AutoCAD etc. Performance your using the wrong device type.
devices like this will always favour the majority user base, and cad designers, while it being nice they 'can' work on an ultraportable device is good, will always favour a full desktop model. So the design onus on from the perspective of larger user base is on battery over performance.

duddit2 said,

i know surface pros are nice tablets/laptop replacements, but tbh if you need decent AutoCAD etc. Performance your using the wrong device type.
devices like this will always favour the majority user base, and cad designers, while it being nice they 'can' work on an ultraportable device is good, will always favour a full desktop model. So the design onus on from the perspective of larger user base is on battery over performance.

Why not both?

Sure, desktops will always offer more performance. But if you can have a device that can also be an ultraportable workstation, why would that be a "wrong device"?

neonspark said,
I really hope surface goes with an nvidia solution next time. the intel graphic drivers are so bad!!!

Really? The original with Intel's HD4000 was a bit weak, but the Surface Pro 2 with HD 4600 scores better than most AMD/NVidia mid-low range notebook GPUs.

Notebookcheck is a fairly accurate site for mobile GPU information:
http://www.notebookcheck.net/I...-Graphics-4600.86106.0.html

If you go to YouTube, you can see people gaming on a Surface Pro and Surface Pro 2.

Also notice, it can run Crysis at around 60fps, and even titles like Skyrim in Med settings around 30fps.

(Which really isn't too bad for a 'tablet' and considerably faster than Android or the iPad can run these games.)


I wouldn't consider the Surface a gaming device, but some casual Guild Wars 2 at a decent framerate would be nice. Maybe some day I'll find out if it's capable, assuming I win the lotto or something.

Wouter52 said,
The question is: does it support ubuntu or linux at all?

It sounds like this is done in hardware rather than software, but I could be wrong.

McKay said,
Who games on a laptop without being plugged in at the mains?

Pretty much nobody which I why I think nVidia optimus for gaming laptops is the most retarded idea ever.

One, my gaming laptop is heavy so it doesn't move around very much and it's always plugged in. So why the #### do I need optimus? Half the time it screws things up anyways.

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Not to mention most gaming laptops cannot fully power it's GPU when they're on battery power. My laptops 780M requires 122W by itself...

-Razorfold said,

Pretty much nobody which I why I think nVidia optimus for gaming laptops is the most retarded idea ever.

One, my gaming laptop is heavy so it doesn't move around very much and it's always plugged in. So why the #### do I need optimus? Half the time it screws things up anyways.

---

Not to mention most gaming laptops cannot fully power it's GPU when they're on battery power. My laptops 780M requires 122W by itself...

Agree

McKay said,
Who games on a laptop without being plugged in at the mains?

Depends on the game.

Titles like WoW or SWTOR and other MMOs run rather well off the grid. Sure they might only get 3 hours of battery life, but it beats having nothing when you are away from a power source.

It also helps gamers that use their cars and don't want to have a huge converter and a Corvette class alternator just to plug in their notebook.

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