NVIDIA launching GeForce GTX Battlebox brand for high-end desktop PCs

While NVIDIA may be pushing its Tegra line of mobile processors these days, it has not forgotten that the company started out as a creator of PC graphics chips. Today, NVIDIA revealed it is working with a number of PC OEMs to create a line up of powerful desktops that will all have then new NVIDIA GeForce GTX Battlebox brand.

In a post on the GeForce.com website, NVIDIA states what a Battlebox-approved PC will be like:

Each GeForce GTX Battlebox performance powerhouse features GeForce GTX 780 GPUs in 2 and 3-Way SLI configurations, supported by overclocked Intel Haswell i5 and i7 CPUs, advanced cooling systems, high-speed DDR3 RAM to assist with overclocking, and the latest high-speed SSDs, which load the action in record time.

The new systems will also be able to run upcoming PC games such as "Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag," "Batman: Arkham Origins," "Call of Duty: Ghosts" and others with full graphics options on 4K resolution monitors.

In addition, all Battlebox PC systems will have the exclusive on what the company is calling the SLI Bridge. NVIDIA says, "Themed to match the award-winning design of the TITAN, GeForce GTX 780, and GeForce GTX 770, the new SLI Bridge enables illumination of its GeForce GTX Claw logo, which perfectly matches the illuminated 'GeForce GTX' text on the GPUs themselves."

In the U.S, PCs with the GeForce GTX Battlebox brand are being made by Falcon Northwest, Maingear, Digital Storm and OriginPC. The GeForce UK website also lists a number of PC OEMs making Battlebox-approved desktops all over Europe. Be prepared to pay up to get your hands on these systems – the Battlebox version of Maingear's Shift PC will set you back about $2,300.

Source: NVIDIA | Image via NVIDIA

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41 Comments

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Is it me, or the "energy saver" goes down the toilet with that, any new GPU's.

It still remmber have a super power PSU of 350W ... I now own a XFX 550W and almost is at peek with 660 Ti in Full power.

Blaze_Zewi said,
So where's the PSU?

For something this big, probably parked outside in the back. (/s) I am curious though how much juice something like this thing would draw. Not like I could justify ever getting something this over the top, just curious.

Max Norris said,

For something this big, probably parked outside in the back. (/s) I am curious though how much juice something like this thing would draw. Not like I could justify ever getting something this over the top, just curious.

One of those can break 300 watts so you could be pushing 1,000 with that setup at peak. That's your average microwave oven. Maybe they should make a hot pocket attachment and part of the game is getting it to run hot enough to make dinner.

Blaze_Zewi said,
So where's the PSU?

It's built right in the backyard nuclear power plant you're also required to have.

Well that's a bit different, I mean do any games even exist that require this much power to run over 60 fps? With cars you can never go too fast but with graphics cards there comes a point when you're just getting nothing in return for all the money you spent and the power you're using.

The only game I've played so far that doesn't max out at great FPS with my single GTX780 is Rome II...and it's sort of pointless when you actually see what it's trying to do. I mean just how big is the market for these uber expensive machines...the only people with time to play that much aren't working! Kidding aside, it's a pretty impressive looking setup.

That SLI bridge is awesome. Wish they'd sell separately. I absolutely dislike those ugly, brown... things... that come with the boards.

Or they just want gamers to get the best experience possible. Don't forget, NVIDIA have already shown what the Titan is capable of. The R9 has yet to prove its potential.

Great, I'll get right on this with my brand new 4K err I mean 2K TV (show me one TV that has true 4K what the movie projectors use resolution....).... </s>

The proverbial future proof setup? I remember when I got the i7920 and ASUS 5870v2, NOTHING stood in my way.... until Alice Madness Returns came out with it's BS physx, and Crysis 3 which is unplayable on ultra on said setup.

Will definitely buy into this.

It will be interesting to see what the cost difference is between these things and just buying the same parts yourself. You may not get the branding, but if you save $1000, who the hell cares.

2300$

How many monitors do you need to use that kind of power ? 10 ?

My 4 years old core i5 750 with a 670 happily runs everything at 1080p high settings without too much trouble.

Spicoli said,
Why?

Because the cards don't have any space inbetween them. I have an SLI setup and because of my motherboard I have to put them in a similar config and the inside card always gets incredibly hot and noisy.

Spicoli said,
How else would you do it and still have the connector work?

Different motherboards have different connectors, depending on the location of the slots and the number of cards they support. AMD is moving to a connectorless interface on their next cards, so going forward it will be less of an issue.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Different motherboards have different connectors, depending on the location of the slots and the number of cards they support. AMD is moving to a connectorless interface on their next cards, so going forward it will be less of an issue.

I'm not talking about the motherboard. The graphics cards have their own bus so they can work together. It's connecting them together on the top.

Spicoli said,
I'm not talking about the motherboard. The graphics cards have their own bus so they can work together. It's connecting them together on the top.

That's what I was talking about. Motherboards ship with SLI bridges to connect cards together and they're designed with the position of the PCIe slots in mind.

theyarecomingforyou said,

That's what I was talking about. Motherboards ship with SLI bridges to connect cards together and they're designed with the position of the PCIe slots in mind.

Got a link? Not that I plan to chain any of these together but someone might ask me about it.

Spicoli said,
Got a link? Not that I plan to chain any of these together but someone might ask me about it.

If you're just talking about pictures of different length SLI bridges then here are a couple of examples:
http://media.bestofmicro.com/H.../original/06therewaysli.jpg
http://i4memory.com/reviewimag...photos/680i_striker_189.jpg
http://www.hothardware.com/art...m1120/790i_SLI_9800_GX2.jpg

They are bundled with motherboards and it depends on which you buy as to how many are included and what layout they have.