Office 15 images show off "Moorea" and more

Microsoft Office is a product that millions use everyday. Office is by far the de facto product when it comes to productivity and Microsoft has dominated the market in this area for years. But not wanting to let the product go stale like it did with Internet Explorer 6, they are currently working on Office 15.

While not the first images of the new productivity suite to leak out, the latest leak does show off a new application that is code named "Moorea". The image above shows the first look at the new application. Mary-Jo Foley suggests that it may be bringing back elements of the Courier project that Microsoft canceled many months ago, but an update later on her post suggests that it may be related to Microsoft Office Labs Canvas for OneNote.

The tagline for "Moorea" is "everything you need in one place" which would mean that it is an aggregator of content. Most likely personal content that will allow you to place all of your information related to a topic into one, user defined, interface that allows you to quickly access all of your information about a particular topic. Imagine you are doing research on birds; You could have your documents, images, and videos all in one place.

The images come courtesy of Winbeta.it and they are from build 15.0.2714.1001. The next version is not expected to hit retail until around 2013, which demonstrates that the Office build is still in the early stages. Microsoft will continue to work on Office and the previously leaked images suggest that Metro will also be incorporated into the productivity suit. The final design of Office is subject to change so anything pictured here may not make it into the final retail build.

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"let the product go stale like it did with Internet Explorer 6"

That analogy does not make any sense. Microsoft Office is a productivity suite that people pay money for, Internet Explorer is a web browser that is "free". I know persons who are more than satisfied with older versions of Microsoft Office. I went to a tailors shop and the lady had a computer running Windows 95 connected the a suing machine and when I looked through the Programs group, she had Microsoft Office 95 installed. I asked if she uses it, she said yes, does all I need. Office doesn't go stale if its not offering features you want and Microsoft has stuck to a diligent 18 to 24 month upgrade cycle for Office for a while now.

The reason why Internet Explorer became stale was because they decided to tie future releases to the OS, Longhorn's ambitions greatly affected IE's development thats why the decision was made to decouple it from the OS and why we have out of band releases.

15-20% (per that link) of the business market isn't bad, curious to see how the constant infighting between Oracle and The Document Foundation shakes things up though. OpenOffice lost developers to Libre, Oracle is dumping commercial support, etc etc. Just my own opinion of course, but personally if I were picking an application suite for business use, I'd want to be sure it was still there a few years down the road, let alone able to get support outside of a user driven forum, never mind the "does it do this as good as Office" versus "I'll just get Office" debate.

Jen Smith said,
15-20% (per that link) of the business market isn't bad, curious to see how the constant infighting between Oracle and The Document Foundation shakes things up though.

Oracle has given up now, and will no longer develop OpenOffice. LibreOffice is now the de-facto FOSS office suite.
http://www.softwarecrew.com/20...-the-open-source-community/

Jen Smith said,

OpenOffice lost developers to Libre, Oracle is dumping commercial support, etc etc. Just my own opinion of course, but personally if I were picking an application suite for business use, I'd want to be sure it was still there a few years down the road, let alone able to get support outside of a user driven forum, never mind the "does it do this as good as Office" versus "I'll just get Office" debate.

Businesses are making vast savings by switching to LibreOffice. For most users and businesses, a FOSS office suite that is good enough and saves money is the winning solution. In some parts of Europe for instance, usage of OpenOffice/LibreOffice is especially high. I foresee another IE scenario here, where the entrenched software (MS Office in this case) gradually goes from a 90%+ marketshare to below 50%. That's really going to hurt Microsoft because Office is its bread and butter.

KavazovAngel said,
OO is crap. Not gonna discuss this. Especially, its formatting is a really big piece of crap.

Terrible product in business environments.


So that's why businesses, governments, and users are switching to it en masse? I guess ignorance really is bliss for some

~Johnny said,

95% for Office in the consumer market and 80 - 85% in the business market says it's still the "de facto product".

That was 2007, and that's by revenue, not usage patterns.
OpenOffice.org 3.x reached one hundred million downloads, just over a year since its release

That number reveals the popularity of it, and again, that number is direct downloads only, not Linux repositories etc.

Flawed said,

That was 2007, and that's by revenue, not usage patterns.

That number reveals the popularity of it, and again, that number is direct downloads only, not Linux repositories etc.

And how many people download and pirate Office? Oh and for that matter how many of that 100 million downloads is just people upgrading to the next version? You hate MS, we get it, your link to wiki doesn't say jack in the end.

According to Forrester Research, as of June 2009, some version of Microsoft Office is used in 80% of enterprises, with 64% of enterprises using Office 2007. And this doesn't even count the new Office 2k10 record sales to date. Sounds pretty defacto to me but you can be ignorant about it if you want.

Flawed said,

So that's why businesses, governments, and users are switching to it en masse? I guess ignorance really is bliss for some

That's because everyone, especially governments who have massive debts, are trying to cut back and save money. Switching to an inferior product with less features, worse performance, questionable security and subpar document compatibility just happens to be a big money saver, though that's no surprise now is it

Not picking sides on either one, but a lot of people forget too about support (or sometimes a lack of it), extendability and compatibility. Free can easily wind up costing more.

~Johnny said,

That's because everyone, especially governments who have massive debts, are trying to cut back and save money.

Precisely. LibreOffice represents a more cost effective solution with comparable functionality.

~Johnny said,

Switching to an inferior product with less features

The majority of users and businesses just need the core set of features present in LibreOffice. Those same needs haven't really changed in years. If you are talking about Microsoft's ribbon ui, then no, that's not what I call a feature, it's more of a distraction, and something businesses and users can do without.

~Johnny said,

worse performance, questionable security and subpar document compatibility

1. Performance is subjective unless you provide evidence to backup your claims.
2. LibreOffice has a built in update system, does Microsoft Office provide the same? Again, I see no evidence for your security claims.
3. Microsoft Office has "subpar" document compatibility with ODF. You see what I did there?

Flawed said,

The majority of users and businesses just need the core set of features present in LibreOffice. Those same needs haven't really changed in years. If you are talking about Microsoft's ribbon ui, then no, that's not what I call a feature, it's more of a distraction, and something businesses and users can do without.


1. Performance is subjective unless you provide evidence to backup your claims.
2. LibreOffice has a built in update system, does Microsoft Office provide the same? Again, I see no evidence for your security claims.
3. Microsoft Office has "subpar" document compatibility with ODF. You see what I did there?

Office 2010 has nearly flawless compatibility with ODF, Office gets updated though Windows Update / Microsoft Update usually automatically, and performance is pretty simple - Office boots faster, uses less RAM, scrolls through complex documents and opens complex documents faster. Even UI responsiveness is generally better with Office.

I say questionable security, as Office's security has been well tested with the amount of attack vectors hackers have tried against it, leading Microsoft to patch up many, many obscure vulnerabilities and focus a lot more on security. Than same cannot be said for OpenOffice, which rarely has any attention looking at hacking it, so there are probably countless undiscovered attack vectors (as there are in any large, complex software) - compounded by the fact that's it's open source which tends to make finding these wholes a heck of a lot easier for hackers than it is with Office. People start moving towards it, it's going to get torn to shreads. It'll eventually get all nice and patched up, but until then it's dangerous waters for Governments and other institutions to be playing with.

And there are plenty of good features that buisness users would be missing out on leaving Office behind - one of those being the ease of creating modern, effective looking documents. The default styles and formatting options included within Office 2010 are miles better than OpenOffices, and look far more professional. There's just far more tools in Office to create professional looking documents, faster and quicker than you can in OpenOffice - along with far better support too.

Edited by ~Johnny, Apr 18 2011, 9:53pm :

Flawed said,
1. Performance is subjective unless you provide evidence to backup your claims.
2. LibreOffice has a built in update system, does Microsoft Office provide the same? Again, I see no evidence for your security claims.
3. Microsoft Office has "subpar" document compatibility with ODF. You see what I did there?

1 - Fair enough
2 - Yea, little thing called Windows Update. All sorts of MS products get updated thru thta, Office included.
3 - Just me of course, but has anyone actually *seen* an ODF file besides something on the Ubuntu liveCD samplers? Any time I'm dealing with a client, it's typically a PDF or once in a while a DOCX. Their choice, not mine. (And office does handle ODF's, just in case that rare situation comes up.)

Jen Smith said,
Not picking sides on either one, but a lot of people forget too about support (or sometimes a lack of it), extendability and compatibility. Free can easily wind up costing more.

1. Both office suites are equally extendible. Scripts, plugins/addons etc.
2. Compatibility. The same old tired ad nauseum argument used by Microsoft's propaganda videos. Compatibility with what? Microsoft has poor compatibility with ODF, so that's an argument for avoiding Microsoft Office. Government departments are choosing Open Office products because of Microsoft's incompatibility with other formats.
3. Proprietary products can end up costing a lot more than expected down the line when departments discover they have been locked into a single product. Just look at IE6, ActiveX, and most other Microsoft products.

Flawed said,
1. Both office suites are equally extendible. Scripts, plugins/addons etc.
2. Compatibility. The same old tired ad nauseum argument used by Microsoft's propaganda videos. Compatibility with what? Microsoft has poor compatibility with ODF, so that's an argument for avoiding Microsoft Office. Government departments are choosing Open Office products because of Microsoft's incompatibility with other formats.
3. Proprietary products can end up costing a lot more than expected down the line when departments discover they have been locked into a single product. Just look at IE6, ActiveX, and most other Microsoft products.

1 - In theory, yes. Try actually working with scripts versus Office Automation and the VSTO. Huge world of difference.
2 - Same old ad nauseum argument right back at you. Again, where are all these ODF's coming from? Which Office does read and write by the way, among a bunch of other formats.
3 - IE6? Really? (And since Office is a Windows product.. I don't think they're too worried about being "locked in".) And what about the departments who jump on the "hey its free so it's got to be good" bandwagon, then have to spend a ton of money to have all their software re-written to actually run on it, or the technical support when stuff doesn't work right and nobody has a clue how to take care of it?

Oh, and just for giggles -
4 - The software you get in both platforms. Everybody seems to forget that OO/Libre is missing about half the functionality. InfoPath, Project, OneNote, Outlook, Sharepoint Workspaces, Visio, never mind all the server and web based portions to go along with it, plus a ton of development tools. Oh and Moorea.
Don't get me wrong, I'm a fan of FOSS, I run a bunch of machines using BSD and Linux myself, but no competition between Office products. If Microsoft would put out a build for *Nix I'd buy it in a heartbeat, but alas, I prefer the Windows desktop myself.

Jen Smith said,
some text.

This might come off as odd, but I love you.

on a more serious matter, what you write makes sence and I share your opinons.
Just wish I was able to format myself in the same way.

LiquidSolstice said,
Holy crap, does Flawed ever give up with his FOSS vision?

Obviously no. Not until MS closes their business door, or when he die. Whichever come first.

When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie that's moorea.

Although on topic, I like the idea of a big cork board type app to bring all my personal info together. I love one note, it's the best app from the office suite, I just whish they would

Add a mac version in office
Open the one note app to international users on the iPad.

With the online sync my digital life would be complete!

Ambroos said,
I like it! Looks like a square zone-based metro-inspired content editor, really looking forward to trying this!

MS has finally embranced the idea of unified theming across all of its products, and I applaud them for that. Makes it a lot easier for users to use when interface, layouts, and fonts are consistent across applications and platforms.

Looks very interactive. I'm picturing a smart board like display in a classroom where you can zoom in different areas of the screen and open up applets like on a WP7.