Office 2013 EULA prevents users from moving software to another PC

Microsoft has been pushing for consumers to try out Office 365 Home Premium, which lets people install the new Office 2013 suite of software products on up to five PCs for the price of $99.99 a year. But what if you just want one copy of Office 2013 on one PC, and then wanted to move that software to another PC in the future?

If that's the case, then you might not be happy with Microsoft's new End User License Agreement for Office 2013. PCWorld.com has confirmed with Microsoft that the new EULA ties Office 2013 to just one PC and one PC only. That means users cannot uninstall that copy of the software and then install it on a different PC, even if that second PC is owned by the same person who owns the original PC that had the copy of Office 2013.

Microsoft offered a "No comment" when asked if a person who installed a copy of Office 2013 could reinstall it on another PC if the original computer was lost, destroyed or stolen. Asked how they planned to enforce such rules, Microsoft stated simply, "Software piracy is a substantial global issue, and we implement a number of protocols to prevent unlawful software distribution.”

It seems clear that the changes to the EULA in Office 2013 are a move by Microsoft to get users to sign up for the Office 365 program. On the one hand, Office 365 helps people who have more than one PC in the house. On the other hand, if a person owns just one PC, it would be cheaper to just buy the stand alone Office 2013 product.

Source: PCWorld.com | Image via Microsoft

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103 Comments

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Amazing how many uneducated and spoiled little kiddies there are on Neowin. If you don't like the terms of this or any software, don't use it. There are plenty of alternatives. If enough people abandon Office, Microsoft will get the message. Problem solved.

See, this is how grown-ups handle things. They speak with their wallets. Not by throwing useless temper tantrums on a silly website. You're rather pathetic, actually.

Edited by COKid, Feb 17 2013, 2:50am :

How does office 2013 licensing differ from that of Windows 8?

For example, I install Windows 8 upgrade on an old pc. I use this pc for two months then decide to buy parts for a brand new pc. I install Windows 8 on the new pc and attempt to use my already activated key, it fails, I phone Microsoft's automated activation line, declare one pc is activated, receive unique code which activates the new pc and deactivates the old pc. Call me mad but I believe this activation process is how it will be for office as well.

Now these are the MS decisions that make me stay away from most of their products. It really does seem that once they have control over a market then they really limit their customers. The whole scroogled thing annoys me when they are doing this in another market they they are dominant in.

This is just going to endorse piracy. If you've bought one license, then you should have the right to use that on more than one computer (though not at the same time). Locking the license to a specific device really seems like a d*ck move.

Makes a sense. Once a year for 5 licenses for the complete Office Package for 100$ - good deal. The same offline suite will cost about 2000, enough for 20 years

This is all very silly. Anyone with a still-functioning university .edu email address can get a 4-year subscription to Office 365 with the full pro suite of applications for $80 total. It amazes me how much creativity people lack with getting a good deal when they'd rather just find something to whinge about.

I think MS is in violation of "the first-sale doctrine" and exhaustion of rights."
Copyright laws don't address this specifically (in the USA) but I think case law does.

Does anybody know a copyright attorney? I bet 10 attorneys would have 10 different answers on this one. So judge and jury get to decide this one.

Libreoffice FTW! I have never bought MS office and really don't see the need to. I'm sure many people feel that somehow they benefit by paying for MS Office, but for what I need an office suite to do, Libreoffice (the new name of the project from the people who used to make OpenOffice) does just fine. Symantec tried to pull this crap on me back in 2007, and I've been using Trend Micro ever since.

Therenis a very simple solution to this issue. Point one...purchsse Office 2013 preinstalled on your new pc...that way when u have to reciver ur oc u get Office back...

If you buy a retail copy activate it anf then to a image of your drive. In the event you have to wipe, reinstall the image with your legal copy of office.

Or, keep ising office 2007 or 2010 which both have activation hacks which will keep those working permanently you dont have to have the latest unless it has features u must have.

Problem solved.

some made experiment its actualy the Hardisk's hardware serial number
(not to confused with 'serial number' that assigned after formating the HDD partition),
that Office 2013 considered as 'new computer'.

the experiment was this way:
Install & Activate office 2013,
remove the HDD, and clone it to another HDD from same manufacture, same type, same capacity.
put the new cloned HDD into where original HDD was.
Office in the new HDD are now demanding activation.

While the OS are tied to Motherboard serial number as its definition of 'new computer',
the Office 2013 are tied to HDD (or SSD) hardware serial number as its definition of 'new computer'.

I wonder how corporations/schools do this... They would have a different package don't they?
Btw, most people don't work at home and why MS has home packages the most?

C'mon guys, Office is expensive, that's been a known fact. They sell it at the price point because they can, just like how Apple can sell expensive computers. They clearly want to move people to a subscription model, they're doing this across all of their software products. That's where the future is. They offer their own free web alternative and no one is stopping you from using other alternatives.

wixostrix said,
C'mon guys, Office is expensive, that's been a known fact. T. That's where the future is. .

It might be if the "market" will say so....

*shakes his head at the comment*

Bloody hell, do any of you guy go into retail stores? Here in the UK we had office 2010 for single PC use for 90 quid or so and that was for 1 PC for the LIFETIME of that PC. The 1 PC use 2013 is the REPLACMENT for that SKU, but now 109 instead. Now the old 3 PC pack has been replaced by Office 365 Home and Student.

So congrats guys going mental at MS at this move, you missed the boat by 2 years...

This is the reason why I migrated to open source programs that does everything I need. The other option is using mtk2.41 with office.

I don't see what the issue is. MS is always stricter in their TOS/Agreements then they actually are. I remember years ago I had an XP OEM thing, the system died so I bought a new motherboard and then also decided to upgrade the HDD/cpu, ram and video.
Reinstalled XP, ran into the activation problem, gave MS a call, explained situation and BWAM I could reuse my OEM license on a non-OEM machine. Even though this goes against their TOS and agreements.
They are not as strict as they seem publicly. You can get allot done from MS by just ASKING.

Its the same for being able to use cracked versions of Windows, or activate Windows 8 by lying. MS isn't so strict, they give some room for the piracy fanboys and people that just lack the money. (you can use Windows 7 and Windows 8 without activating for an unlimited time period for example, win7 has 3hourly popups where Win8 only has a watermark and you cannot change metro settings so much)

it didn't happen to me but a good friend of mine, which had a laptop with Ubuntu, old thing. Lack of money to even buy a Windows license. But was required to use Windows by his school. He rang MS, explained situation, and got a FREE license.

Not nice at all. An excellent reason to not upgrade or buy Office 2013. Also, another indication of Microsoft's arrogance.
So, when I buy Office 2013 this month, then, say in two or three months, I buy a new computer--tough sh**! Hardly. I'll be sticking with Office 2010.

Seems being innovative these days only goes so far as to squeezing the last bit of profit out of something with the least amount of effort.

The goal of this is to get people to
1. use Office 365, or
2. buy a copy each time they switch computers

They want people to spend more money, even though technically I doubt Office keys will be tied to a hardware id, so those of us who build pc's should be ok. It's only normal consumers who will be 'tricked' into spending more money.

It's clearly designed to get people onto the Office 365 programme.

This isn't about locking the software to a single PC forever but taking out the option to have multiple computers licensed to run Office at the same time unless you take out an Office 365 subscription.

If your computer blows up then you might need having to phone them to get it transferred. Same as usual.

DonC said,
It's clearly designed to get people onto the Office 365 programme.

This isn't about locking the software to a single PC forever but taking out the option to have multiple computers licensed to run Office at the same time unless you take out an Office 365 subscription.

If your computer blows up then you might need having to phone them to get it transferred. Same as usual.

Is this your interpretation or it is written somewhere? I am asking because I did not find it.

I did a quick search through the EULA and found this:

Anytime you transfer the software to a new computer, you must remove the software from the prior computer. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between computers.

So why would that be there if you can't transfer it between computers you own?

Also some guy on winsupersite contacted MS support and got this:

"James: Thank you for waiting.
James: If you can uninstall the software form your old computer you can install on another computer and use it without any issues.
JF L: This applies to the 2013 version?
JF L: What if the computer is dead and the software can't be uninstalled normally?
JF L: Because I noticed that on one page, it says about Office 2013 "non-transferable"
James: Yes, it applies to 2013 If the computer is crashed or no longer in a working condition the license would be deactivated automatically and you can use the software on your new computer.
JF L: So "non-transferable" doesn't mean it can't be transferred? Seems a little misleading
James: I would still agree without it is a non transferable software but we do consider for the computer crashed or not working cases.
JF L: Or if it's uninstalled from an old computer, correct?
James: Yes."

So it seems that there's some confusion. Some people are saying that you can transfer it, some people are saying that you cannot. Either way MS needs to correct it, and if its actually true that you can't transfer then that's just plain retarded.

-Razorfold said,
*snip*
I'd imagine their support doesn't know what's going on. Only OEM softare has been tied to the metal on activation in the past.

How is it that Neowin is just figuring this out. They've said no "retail" version for a while now. That means no "not tied to the metal" installs.

metallithrax said,
Well, i've never bought Microsoft Office, ever. I have always used open office, and now use Kingsoft Office.

I encourage you to buy it, your productivity will increase 10 fold!

icwhatudidthere said,
I'm more than happy with Office 2007 and I'll never rent software.

Why, you do not own Office 2007, you only own a usage license. Which comes down to exactly that, renting.

icwhatudidthere said,
I'm more than happy with Office 2007 and I'll never rent software.

You are renting 2007, you do not own it, Microsoft does.

Shadowzz said,

Why, you do not own Office 2007, you only own a usage license. Which comes down to exactly that, renting.

I think it was obvious that icwhatudidthere was indicating he is against paying subscription fees, and prefers a one-time charge for the software license instead.

ingramator said,

You are renting 2007, you do not own it, Microsoft does.

Not exactly a rent: first you buy the right to use it for as long as you want; second, depending by the Country you bought it, you also have the right to resell it regardless what the TOS and EULA state.

won't hurt pirates at all, will hurt those of us who change systems frequently and build systems.....

is this really true? or is this like office 2010 where one SKU you didn't have transfer rights, and another SKU you did (ala keycard install vs retail package) ? Maybe someone is reading the wrong EULA...

neufuse said,
won't hurt pirates at all, will hurt those of us who change systems frequently and build systems.....

is this really true? or is this like office 2010 where one SKU you didn't have transfer rights, and another SKU you did (ala keycard install vs retail package) ? Maybe someone is reading the wrong EULA...

it has been mentioned on Office Watch for a while:
http://office-watch.com/t/n.aspx?a=1818

A load of crap. They're not going to enforce this and I doubt anyone who legitimately purchased it would think twice if they need to change PC's. I have MSDN account and so far I've used one key to do the exact same thing. My laptop got busted so I got a new one and used the same key I used the first time around. No restriction on the activation side of things (not yet at least; I just finished setting up my new laptop a little over a week ago). That being said, this is a pretty douche baggy of them to do...

I guess it might probably be taken with a grain of salt and that you are still be able to install.... unless also a hardware is sent to Microsoft and thoroughly checked upon.

if it is true im sure you could phone up microsoft and theyd change whatever ID they got to lock it in to that one and delete the other so its still 1 pc. more hassle i guess and if they dont say to them well pirate bay is my my new best friend

The fact that they refused to answer your questions and said "no comment" shows how evil they are, they don't know what your rights are.

torrentthief said,
The fact that they refused to answer your questions and said "no comment" shows how evil they are, they don't know what your rights are.
What right does one have to another's property?

MrHumpty said,
What right does one have to another's property?

The right to have clearly explained what a contract, sorry an agreement they are signing means.....

Fritzly said,
The right to have clearly explained what a contract, sorry an agreement they are signing means.....
If it says "non-transferable" That's pretty clear whether people like it or not.

torrentthief said,
The fact that they refused to answer your questions and said "no comment" shows how evil they are, they don't know what your rights are.

The fact that you see 'evil' (really? EVIL?) where it's probably just standard corporate behavior not to give out comments willy nilly shows what a fairy tale land you think you live in.

What do they mean exactly? Are they saying that a second installation on another PC will not activate at all, OR that you can install and activate it but you're not really supposed to?

Kind of like WinRAR. You can still use it after the trial period and it's still fully functional, but you're not supposed to.

Well some people like me want to do only what they are supposed to do with the software they buy.

I think one day or another governments will have to regulate EULA and TOS to clearly, by laws, stipulate what you can and cannot write in those. I honestly think it's stupid that EULA and TOS are still today not regulated by any laws.

I think Governments have enough to deal with. Who cares is Mary Lou Ann installs word off of one computer and on to the next.

LaP said,
Well some people like me want to do only what they are supposed to do with the software they buy.

I think one day or another governments will have to regulate EULA and TOS to clearly, by laws, stipulate what you can and cannot write in those. I honestly think it's stupid that EULA and TOS are still today not regulated by any laws.

Your faith in Government seems unfounded.

LaP said,
Well some people like me want to do only what they are supposed to do with the software they buy.

I think one day or another governments will have to regulate EULA and TOS to clearly, by laws, stipulate what you can and cannot write in those. I honestly think it's stupid that EULA and TOS are still today not regulated by any laws.


Err, an EULA and TOS are restricted by law as is everything.
Their EULA/TOS says I cannot reinstall, my countries and EU law say any software I purchased, I have to be able to use. So if my computer dies, or for whatever reason I have to reinstall Office to new hardware, they can take away my activation as they please. But they cannot stop me from using the software in alternative ways. (unfortunally companies do deserve the right to cut you down if you break their TOS. but they cannot prevent me from using my legally acquired license even if have to use 'illegal' ways to do so.)

Shadowzz said,

Err, an EULA and TOS are restricted by law as is everything.
Their EULA/TOS says I cannot reinstall, my countries and EU law say any software I purchased, I have to be able to use. So if my computer dies, or for whatever reason I have to reinstall Office to new hardware, they can take away my activation as they please. But they cannot stop me from using the software in alternative ways. (unfortunally companies do deserve the right to cut you down if you break their TOS. but they cannot prevent me from using my legally acquired license even if have to use 'illegal' ways to do so.)

Exactly. For all intends and purposes, this statement in the EU is complete and utter BS.

So what happens if I replace my motherboard? Am I attached to another object by an incline plane, wrapped helicly around an axis?

If you unsolder all capacitors from the previous motherboard and solder them on the new motherboard you are entitled a 5% discount on a new Office 2013 copy, but only during the 25th hour of February the 30th.

Tyler R. said,
So what happens if I replace my motherboard? Am I attached to another object by an incline plane, wrapped helicly around an axis?
If you call Microsoft (assuming the activation doesn't work) and tell them that you've replaced your motherboard. They will just allow you to activate it.

MrHumpty said,
If you call Microsoft (assuming the activation doesn't work) and tell them that you've replaced your motherboard. They will just allow you to activate it.

Actually this is not what the article say:
"Microsoft offered a "No comment" when asked if a person who installed a copy of Office 2013 could reinstall it on another PC if the original computer was lost, destroyed or stolen."
Where you able to find that they will reactivate it written somewhere? Unfortunately nowadays verbal reassurance do not fly...

Verba Volant, scripta manent... Literally "spoken words fly away, written words remain".

Fritzly said,
Actually this is not what the article say:
"Microsoft offered a "No comment" when asked if a person who installed a copy of Office 2013 could reinstall it on another PC if the original computer was lost, destroyed or stolen."
Where you able to find that they will reactivate it written somewhere? Unfortunately nowadays verbal reassurance do not fly...

Verba Volant, scripta manent... Literally "spoken words fly away, written words remain".

Unfortunately most people do not understand Microsoft's OEM licensing. This article is generally useless if you want treal information and you're not going to get a comment out of someone who isn't reading from a script so to think otherwise is nuts when it comes to MS licensing. Hell, most reps don't understand it and you are tossed to a licensing specialist.

Anyway, assuming this is like their OEM licensing then the "computer" is literally the "motherboard" to find "written word" look on http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/e...g_faq.aspx#fbid=Fq8VcSmlKVr under "Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?"

Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer

Either another attempt to get you using the cloud service or just a method to make more money.
Pretty scummy in my mind, the XP activation system worked best, you could activate the same hardware as much as you wanted or a different hardware once after a year or something from the last activation a few times then after that you had to speak to someone.

Javik said,
Do nothing to hinder pirates, plenty to hinder people that use their software legally. Class.

Not to mention $20 more expensive...

Darrah Ford said,
Its the new Microsoft way and all the Metro-sheep are playing right into it. Walled garden Windows 8/Blue, sardine can Windows 9/10

It's hardly sheepish if you're required to use it for school or work...

You clearly don't understand, they did it to increase Office 365 value! /s

From a 3 PC licenses with no reinstall limits to just 1 license that is locked to a single machine. What the Dell, Microsoft?

Javik said,
Do nothing to hinder pirates, plenty to hinder people that use their software legally. Class.

Isn't that how all anti-piracy policies work?

Javik said,
Do nothing to hinder pirates, plenty to hinder people that use their software legally. Class.
This is no different than the OEM copies of Office that have been sold as far back as I can remember. They've simply removed the "retail" box copy. Makes me sad, but frankly, I'll use a computer for 3-4 years. The cost to me is less than I'll spend for online backup monthly.

Javik said,
Do nothing to hinder pirates, plenty to hinder people that use their software legally. Class.

They can f* off for what I care. If I change computers I will transfer my legitimate license to my new PC. PERIOD. They might come and get me if they want to. Let's see how their claim would stick with the EU commission.

wolftail said,

Isn't that how all anti-piracy policies work?

It is about making profits of quarter X in year 2 higher than the profits of quarter X in year 1.

Get the subscription, then. You can install that on multiple machines.

The retail box seems more for businesses which don't transfer licenses.

MrHumpty said,
This is no different than the OEM copies of Office that have been sold as far back as I can remember. They've simply removed the "retail" box copy. Makes me sad, but frankly, I'll use a computer for 3-4 years. The cost to me is less than I'll spend for online backup monthly.

Besides the annoyance to buy Office 2013 only at the moment you buy a new computer what happens if your motherboard gets fried or replaced by the OEM? What if your HD die and you need to replace it? What if your computer is stolen, destroyed?
Lot of unanswered questions here.

Fritzly said,

Besides the annoyance to buy Office 2013 only at the moment you buy a new computer what happens if your motherboard gets fried or replaced by the OEM? What if your HD die and you need to replace it? What if your computer is stolen, destroyed?
Lot of unanswered questions here.

If the same motherboard is used as a replacement then the activation will have no problems. If you replace the hard drive that too won't cause problems. It's the Motherboard/Processor when it comes to OEM replacement that has always been the sticking point for OEM's.

Again, though, your entire paragraph was no different than the 2010 OEM installs of yesteryear.

pmdci said,
They can f* off for what I care. If I change computers I will transfer my legitimate license to my new PC. PERIOD. They might come and get me if they want to. Let's see how their claim would stick with the EU commission.
Activation is activation. You'll have to hack it to get it working if they won't let you activate it.

Let me introduce you to LibreOffice. You don't have to worry about them taking profits from you.

Except the retail box you pay one fee and that's you for life (well until you upgrade or your computer breaks). The subscription is only good for 1 year. Next year you have to pay another $100 etc.
The boxed copy works out far cheaper.
This is just a money grab. Can actually see Microsoft potentially getting sued over this.

Darrah Ford said,
Its the new Microsoft way and all the Metro-sheep are playing right into it. Walled garden Windows 8/Blue, sardine can Windows 9/10

excactly

If you read the article you will see that MS did not comment on these scenarios, not even about the motherboard specifically.
Now, nothing personal against you but I would prefer something definitive from MS, and on paper not just words from help desk reps.

MrHumpty said,
Activation is activation. You'll have to hack it to get it working if they won't let you activate it.

Let me introduce you to LibreOffice. You don't have to worry about them taking profits from you.

I tried LibreOffice and while yes, it's free, I found myself wasting time to get the same kind of work done that I do in Excel.

Fritzly said,
If you read the article you will see that MS did not comment on these scenarios, not even about the motherboard specifically.
Now, nothing personal against you but I would prefer something definitive from MS, and on paper not just words from help desk reps.
I agree. My guess is MS will backpedal from the non-transferable language as most didn't understand OEM restrictions or care. It was *usually* only when someone was buying a new computer and you would be likely to use that same metal for 3-4 years. In this case, you could be buying for a computer you may trash w/i a few months.

Enron said,
I tried LibreOffice and while yes, it's free, I found myself wasting time to get the same kind of work done that I do in Excel.
Yet, it is an option. Everybody is acting as if you must have Office therefor Microsoft must price it in a way that makes them happy. There are plenty of alternatives, they just suck when compared to MS Office.

MrHumpty said,
Activation is activation. You'll have to hack it to get it working if they won't let you activate it.

Let me introduce you to LibreOffice. You don't have to worry about them taking profits from you.

There is a way to perform multiple activations without a hack. Plus there are other ways of around it which, although the license might say it is not legal, there are no ways of preventing it the installation.

MrHumpty said,
Let me introduce you to LibreOffice. You don't have to worry about them taking profits from you.

Will have to get back to you on that... after LibreOffice finishes loading... See ya next month. LOL

ir0nw0lf said,
Will have to get back to you on that... after LibreOffice finishes loading... See ya next month. LOL
That's what I love about all the profit haters. There are non-profit alternatives. They just suck.

pmdci said,

They can f* off for what I care. If I change computers I will transfer my legitimate license to my new PC. PERIOD.

Please explain how it's "legitimate"? When you buy you agree to the terms, if you aint reading the EULA, that is your fault not MS's. If you don't like what they are binding you to when you buy the product. Then don't buy it. But buying it, installing it then turning around and saying you don't agree doesn't make it "legitimate".

pmdci said,
They might come and get me if they want to. Let's see how their claim would stick with the EU commission.

well, if would MS 'contributes' several billions dollars to EU govts, EU may change their mind and start defending the MS claim.

MrHumpty said,
Activation is activation. You'll have to hack it to get it working if they won't let you activate it.

Let me introduce you to LibreOffice. You don't have to worry about them taking profits from you.

so ur solution to MS Office is to download a free stripped down useless version that breaks any dic that has incomoatible extended formatting. There is a reason why businesses woilf rayher pay for Office. Its the defacto dtandard. It does what they want the way they want. Getting whst you want is never free

TechieXP said,
so ur solution to MS Office is to download a free stripped down useless version that breaks any dic that has incomoatible extended formatting. There is a reason why businesses woilf rayher pay for Office. Its the defacto dtandard. It does what they want the way they want. Getting whst you want is never free

Neither is charging an outrageous amount of cash, for only the rich can afford. This restrictive crap is getting almost as bad as apple. They got billions doing nothing but gaining interest.

Lead Wirst said,

Please explain how it's "legitimate"? When you buy you agree to the terms, if you aint reading the EULA, that is your fault not MS's. If you don't like what they are binding you to when you buy the product. Then don't buy it. But buying it, installing it then turning around and saying you don't agree doesn't make it "legitimate".

The day I start giving a dam, I promise you will be the first to know.

If I buy one copy of something, I plan to use that one copy of something the way I see fit. No company will go over my statutory rights. Such BS wouldn't stick in the EU.

Edited by pmdci, Feb 16 2013, 7:19pm :

MrHumpty said,
Not to burst your bubble. But that's considered a "hack"

No it isn't. I do not hamper with any files and I indeed activate the product. There is just an alternative way of doing it.

pmdci said,
The day I start giving a dam, I promise you will be the first to know.

If I buy one copy of something, I plan to use that one copy of something the way I see fit. No company will go over my statutory rights. Such BS wouldn't stick in the EU.

Just so we're clear. You have no legal right to use the property of a software company. You are allowed usage through their TOS and EULA. When you purchase the option to use that software you do so under the limitations placed on you by the licensee. In general, you never own Office. You are granted a license to use it by Microsoft. Those are your "statutory rights."

TechieXP said,
so ur solution to MS Office is to download a free stripped down useless version that breaks any dic that has incomoatible extended formatting. There is a reason why businesses woilf rayher pay for Office. Its the defacto dtandard. It does what they want the way they want. Getting whst you want is never free
While I admire your zeal your argument is horrible presented in many ways.

I prefer Office. I will pay to use office because it increases my productivity by more than it costs me over the lifetime of my usage of the product. I will never Libre Office because it's like stepping back in time to using Office 97. I won't use Google Docs because the free alternative Office Web Apps is better.

However, anybody complaining about how terrible Microsofts pricing is while crying out for their Government to force Microsoft to price their product under fair market value are more than welcome to heed my advice. They by no means are forced to use Office and there are alternatives available.

MrHumpty said,
[...] Those are your "statutory rights."

Do you even know what statutory rights are? Neither Microsoft's, nor any other company's TOC or EULA gives anybody statutory rights. These are the rights ruled by the local/national government.

I buy something (acquired it legally) I then will use that sole copy the way I see fit. Good thing about it is that I don't need to give a rat's a** about what you or Microsoft think. And good luck trying to pin down people in an EU court for re-installing their copy of Office 2013 in a new PC.

pmdci said,
Do you even know what statutory rights are? Neither Microsoft's, nor any other company's TOC or EULA gives anybody statutory rights. These are the rights ruled by the local/national government.

I buy something (acquired it legally) I then will use that sole copy the way I see fit. Good thing about it is that I don't need to give a rat's a** about what you or Microsoft think. And good luck trying to pin down people in an EU court for re-installing their copy of Office 2013 in a new PC.

Statutory rights are those afforded you by law. the TOS and EULA are the agreements you enter into with the owner of the property you are licensing. Like I said, it's cute how you are reacting to this.

As far as the EU goes. You're right, their statutory rights are different. Here in the grand ole US of A the owner of the property is given proper abilities to license out his/her property to licensees.

You're cute. Just, plain ole button nosed cute.

MrHumpty said,
As far as the EU goes. You're right, their statutory rights are different. Here in the grand ole US of A the owner of the property is given proper abilities to license out his/her property to licensees..

Sucks to be you.

You bore me. Off you go to the ignore list.

By reading this comment you accept to rename all your prized shiny Pokemons to Digimons and to abstain from participating in cheese rolling competitions for the amount of years four (4).