Office 365 voted best cloud app of 2011

Microsoft Office 365 is the best cloud app of 2011, according to CRN. Listing the 15 best products of 2011, the magazine said that Office 365 was 'the real deal, and it blows away Google Apps.'

So, what's so great about Office 365? CRN cites price as one of the primary draws, with subscriptions starting at $6 per month per user, which is actually a dollar more than the monthly pricing for Google Apps for Business. Office 365 also came out ahead because of its ease of use, since it's possible to roll out full functionality across large enterprises in a matter of minutes.

Office 365 offers more than just a version of Office in the cloud, including Exchange Online for e-mail, SharePoint Online for document collaboration and sharing, and Lync Online for communications.

Since its launch earlier this year, Microsoft says that Office 365 has been growing eight times faster than expected. Despite some issues with downtime, overall the reaction to the product has been positive, and it is a true competitor to Google Docs. The biggest benefactors of their competition are, of course, their customers. You can bet that Microsoft and Google will both be working hard to entice users with new features and more stability as the cloud becomes more and more important to their business. 

Other products that made CRN's list included the Samsung Galaxy Tab, Mac OS X Lion, the HP TouchSmart 9300 Elite, and LibreOffice. The best product of the year? Apple's iPad 2.

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19 Comments

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Office 365 is absolutely amazing. My only complaint so far is the lack of features on the web based office.

The best part is with Live Domains and Office Live you can use these service for free. You just don't get tech support or SLA's etc.

MS is finally bringing it on so many fronts and I'm ready to see if after the anti-trust restrictions/monitoring. So many of Microsoft's services are disjointed primarily because they were avoiding being slapped on the hand. Apple has gone forward with integrating so many of their services and MS hasn't been able to respond. Windows 8 should be great response.

Unfortunately MS face an uphill battle in Europe while they continue to host all their servers in the US. Until they can guarantee that European data won't be subjected to the US Patriot Act there's no way they can comply with EU data protection laws.

It's a shame because they clearly have a great product to offer.

jakem1 said,
Unfortunately MS face an uphill battle in Europe while they continue to host all their servers in the US. Until they can guarantee that European data won't be subjected to the US Patriot Act there's no way they can comply with EU data protection laws.

It's a shame because they clearly have a great product to offer.

Oh you mean meet European data protection laws like they already have done?
http://www.microsoft.com/Press...dec11/12-14O365CloudPR.mspx

Enron said,

Oh you mean meet European data protection laws like they already have done?
http://www.microsoft.com/Press...dec11/12-14O365CloudPR.mspx


Doesn't matter. MS, being a US company, is still subject to US law and hence the Patriot Act, even for data hosted outside the US. The fact is, it's impossible for any US company to comply with foreign data protection laws. This applies to Google, Yahoo, Facebook, etc.

Of course, this only applies to hosted services. MS has the advantage in that it has several on-site products. Since the data in those may not be controlled by a US company or hosted in the US, US law cannot be extended to those.

jakem1 said,
Unfortunately MS face an uphill battle in Europe while they continue to host all their servers in the US. Until they can guarantee that European data won't be subjected to the US Patriot Act there's no way they can comply with EU data protection laws.

It's a shame because they clearly have a great product to offer.

I'm surprised that someone like Ron Paul hasn't raised that as an issue (beyond the usual civil liberties arguments he raises) when it comes to the Republican debates. The terrorists have already won - the US is terrorised and paranoid passing restrictive laws left, right and centre with Joe Sixpack in his trailer park thinking he's being kept safe.

funkydude said,
I'm WTFing also. Win7 SP1 should also be there!

Cloud is the big hype these days and Lion taps into that hype very well - just wait till Windows 8 comes out with the heavy Cloud integration with Live services and you'll see CRN praising it as well. At the end of the day though these decisions are very much based on subjective opinion and politically motivated decisions - the fact that they chose Oracle really shows the depth that CRN has come to when it makes decisions based on what the details on the box say rather than how the product performs in the real world.

funkydude said,

Read the part after Windows 7... nvm I guess the point flew past you.

"

Why would a "Service Pack " be in a best produst list when its just includes all the updates released before it and a few new improvements.

Doli said,
"

Why would a "Service Pack " be in a best produst list when its just includes all the updates released before it and a few new improvements.

It think the joke funkydude was trying to point out, was how a lot of people called and still believe that Lion is just a service pack for Snow Leopard

A very interesting list. Two HP computers and LibreOffice also made it to the list.

I was expecting to see PS Vita to be on the list though.

If anyone that know how to make productivity applications, it's microsoft. They also happen to be the #2 top cloud computing company too.