Office Mix discovered, sign up for the preview now

Microsoft's Office platform is the cornerstone of productivity in the enterprise and classroom environments; it is also now available on the iPad. But it looks like Microsoft isn't done rolling out new products as mix.office.com was recently discovered and it is a new tool for the classroom.

What is mix.office.com? It's a new service that turns PowerPoint presentations into interactive, online lessons that you can share with anyone. In short, it's a new way for educators to distribute and interact with their presentations. Microsoft's FAQ about the service says that Office Mix does the following:

MIX allows you to turn your PowerPoints into interactive online lessons or presentations. We install an add-in that gives you the ability to record audio, video, and handwriting, and insert interactive elements like quizzes and CK12 exercises. There’s even a screen capture tool so you can record anything on your PC.
Once your presentation is ready just click “Create MIX.” We work our magic to mix in xml for an interactive document complete with analytics, and place it in the cloud. From there, just share the link, and your students can watch it on just about any device with a web browser. You can then check student progress online and see who watched the presentation, and how they did on your quizzes.

From the description, it's quite clear that this tool is designed for the education sector and we can see how, from an educators perspective, being able to monitors students progression through a PowerPoint could be useful.

While the 'Preview' does not appear to be quite ready yet, if you sign up using the link below, you can get on the wait-list for when the feature becomes ready for public consumption. 

View: Mix.Office.com | Thanks for the tip H0x0d

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Sweet. I'm all forward with making our classrooms a better experience. Let's hope teachers can adjust cas we all know they cant

Sounds like the 'ShowMe' app for iPad, similarly aimed at the education market; particularly the online, distant learning sector.

In that light, with respect, much of the presentation advise is a little misplaced... It assumes a speaker with an audience in attendance all in the same place, at the same time, with the speaker controlling interaction. In many, if not most areas where Office Mix will be applied none of that will hold. This is'nt a "presentation" it's a guided tutorial

Does education also include, business process documentation, guidance and training.

A professor of mine enforced a great rule in one of my business classes for all our presentations... the 7x7 rule... no more than 7 bullets per slide with a max of 7 words per bullet. The less the better, and you talk through the rest. :-)

Office Mix sounds really exciting! It sounds like an Adobe Captivate competitor almost but better... I'm excited!!

Sweet :)

I still hate how PPT are handled today. Professors usually throw a lot of text garbage on it and talk talk talk talk... (Sigh)....

Hope this change the game a little.

Doing PowerPoint right is a very tricky task for most people...

Ideally, you have very little in your slides and you talk. The "meat" needs to go into the Notes section if you're leaving something behind for people to obtain via a later run through of the slides.

I went to school for Public Health years ago and we had a professor teach PowerPoint as it related to public speaking. She would drop a grade letter or two if you put any type of animation in your presentation. Slides are meant to be broad while the speaker expands on the material presented.

I went to school for Public Health years ago and we had a professor teach PowerPoint as it related to public speaking. She would drop a grade letter or two if you put any type of animation in your presentation. Slides are meant to be broad while the speaker expands on the material presented.

While I agree that many animations are poorly used, I've found that they are useful for describing processes in diagrams. Issuing a broad rule against their use doesn't help anyone make a presentation more comprehensible or informative. The problem is now that some people use them without thinking, and other people don't use them, without thinking. :/

The reason my professor discouraged us from using them is that they detract the audience from the speaker. The primary focus should be on the speaker, not the flying words and transitions on the screen. I remember taking a trip to a public health conference at UNC Chapel Hill and I understood what she meant by it as there were some health educators that had presentations where animation was used and I even caught myself staring at the slides and missing out on some of the talk.

To this day, I rarely use them, more for where I have a question on a slide and after I quiz the audience, the answers show up on the slide.