Official Windows 8 blog talks about getting public feedback

In previous posts on Microsoft's official Windows 8 blog site, the company has discussed a number of topics related to the development of its next PC operating system. Those topics included Windows 8's new Metro user interface, its support for ISO disc images and VHD files and the new "ribbon" UI for its Explorer file system, among others. In the latest post on the blog, Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky goes in a different direction. This time he writes about how Microsoft is handling feedback from the general public concerning what has been revealed so far about Windows 8.

Sinofsky writes, "We knew talking about Windows 8 would be different than talking about Windows 7. Whereas Windows 7 was about returning to roots, Windows 8 is about maintaining those roots while moving forward in a big and new way. Moving in a new direction always brings engineering challenges as well as challenges in just talking about what we’ve done." The company has already received lots of comments from people about the operating system's new user interface. Sinofsky writes that discussing the new UI by just looking at static images "misses the point". He adds, "Very much like zooming in too far with a microscope, the big picture is lost. It also surfaces the least actionable sorts of feedback to wade through of the “love it” / “hate it” variety. Even with short videos we have not found the right way to put context around the overall experience. Given enough focus, light, and magnification, anything can become important and the subject of a big debate. We certainly contributed to that."

The types of responses that Sinofsky has received from the public concerning Windows 8 has, as one might expect, varied widely. He says, "I’ve certainly received my share of extremely warm messages telling me to ignore 'those trolls and fanboys' and 'what you’re saying resonates.' Those are nice to read in the face of an equal number of messages telling me how poor a job we’re doing. We also receive a great many very specific questions and suggestions." He concludes this blog post by saying, "I just want to reiterate that we are actively participating. Believe me, this blog is the “talk of the town” here in Redmond. :-) We look forward to the continued exchanges – the good feedback, the critique, and the constructive comments. It helps us deliver to you all a product that meets our stated goal of Windows, reimagined."

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I will believe MS is serious about being concerned and sensitive to user feedback when I see some previews of how Win-8 is going to work on PCs (not tablets) using keyboard/mouse interfaces. As of now, all the hype seems to be centered on "touchy-feely" tablets.

TsarNikky said,
As of now, all the hype seems to be centered on "touchy-feely" tablets.

According to Callum the new UI is way better on desktops than the old one

Matthew Thepc said,
In my mind Win8 is going back to their roots. MS-DOS exectuve had atiled interface without overlapping windows, just like win8

DOS didn't even have tiles, there was just the prompt. Windows 1 had tiles instead of windows, it was only after Windows 2 that the windows could overlap…

And yes, it feels like a step backwards - especially if you're using a whole lot of programs at the same time…

Windows 8 is really 2 operating systems, the usual and expected upgrade from 7 to 8 plus a new skin specifically designed to touch and tablets.

Will Windows 8 have new icons like "My Computer" and "Recycle Bin" for example?

I was a little disappointed when Windows 7 used the same old icons from Vista!

gate1975mlm said,
Will Windows 8 have new icons like "My Computer" and "Recycle Bin" for example?

I was a little disappointed when Windows 7 used the same old icons from Vista!

I know right? The icons they use are a really big part of the OS and they can certainly not be changed.

I don't know how much feedback I read during the development of IE9 regarding a spell checker and Microsoft didn't budge. So I really don't take their claim of listening to feedback that seriously.

srprimeaux said,
I don't know how much feedback I read during the development of IE9 regarding a spell checker and Microsoft didn't budge. So I really don't take their claim of listening to feedback that seriously.

This i agree with. The IE team are complete douches when it comes to implementing competitive features. I can't use addons at work because its restricted by GPO, so no spell checker for me.

spudtrooper said,

This i agree with. The IE team are complete douches when it comes to implementing competitive features. I can't use addons at work because its restricted by GPO, so no spell checker for me.


Why do people need all this crap. IE will remain what it is now, just a normal, minimalistic, fast and secure browser with no extra crap that make it bloated. Are you people too stupid to check your spelling on your own?

Coi said,

Why do people need all this crap. IE will remain what it is now, just a normal, minimalistic, fast and secure browser with no extra crap that make it bloated. Are you people too stupid to check your spelling on your own?

I have many extensions on both Safari & Chrome and neither one is what I would called bloated. Yet IE9 has two add-ons: LastPass and Bing Bar and it slows down when opened for the first time (I assume to load them). Obviously, the fault doesn't lie in the fact of people enjoying add-ons since I can have quite a few and not have a problem with a particular browser.

As far as being too stupid to check our own spelling, wow ... you seriously had to go there?

Coi said,

IE may not have spell check built-in but it is available as an addon.

But this topic deals with public feedback. Public feedback was, during the development of IE9, users wanted a built-in spell checker. Microsoft didn't budge. Why are we to expect things will change? Are they really listening or not?

srprimeaux said,

But this topic deals with public feedback. Public feedback was, during the development of IE9, users wanted a built-in spell checker. Microsoft didn't budge. Why are we to expect things will change? Are they really listening or not?


It's true, Microsoft is pretty resistant to feedback that doesn't fit their own schedules (e.g.: WHS users wanted a DriveExtender in Vail - what happend? Nothing!) It's more like: "Report bugs but keep your suggestions."

Tagged MP4 support in Windows Media Center (playback and display using tags just like your music collection)
Ability to index a shared network folder in X64 (a disgrace this wasn't fixed)

Microsoft continues monopoly on content about project code name Windows 8. =)

The Blogosphere is left with little to no news to report. Wiley MS cleverly shows them the goods behind closed doors and locks them into an NDA, whistle they scoop them by officially releasing the information on the official Windows 8 Blog, forcing only commentary by Bloggers and their site visitors everywhere.

I hope M$ listens to me and make win8 work with legacy and new devices well. The economy the way it is most people cannot afford nor wish to cough up hard earned cash just to boost M$ pockets and such. Let people decide when and if to upgrade their PC's etc... once trying out Win8. This was the main fault with Vista. Win7 is much more able to handle legacy stuff but it still lags behind. I am hoping to get my Beta Invite for Win8.

belto said,
I hope M$ listens to me and make win8 work with legacy and new devices well. The economy the way it is most people cannot afford nor wish to cough up hard earned cash just to boost M$ pockets and such. Let people decide when and if to upgrade their PC's etc... once trying out Win8. This was the main fault with Vista. Win7 is much more able to handle legacy stuff but it still lags behind. I am hoping to get my Beta Invite for Win8.

darn it I keep clicking like when I mean to click reply.....

anyways, M$, what are you 12? no one calls it M$ anymore, especially when Apple has more value now.....

but seriously, legacy hardware? if your legacy hardware didn't work on vista or windows 7 it wont work on 8, but if it did, it still will unless your hardware's software is complete crap, but then that isn't microsoft's fault that your vendor can't write good software

belto said,
I hope M$ listens to me and make win8 work with legacy and new devices well. The economy the way it is most people cannot afford nor wish to cough up hard earned cash just to boost M$ pockets and such. Let people decide when and if to upgrade their PC's etc... once trying out Win8. This was the main fault with Vista. Win7 is much more able to handle legacy stuff but it still lags behind. I am hoping to get my Beta Invite for Win8.
Legacy devices is out of their hands and in the hands of the OEM. MS can ask HP to update drivers and software for old devices, but HP will only laugh.

We have some printers that Telecommuters use and HP only supports basic printing under Win7, no support for fax, scanning, and copying via the software like they do for WinXP. That's 10,000 devices HP will happily see us replace.

So don't hold your breath for sudden support of legacy devices, supporting old hardware does not make money.

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,

darn it I keep clicking like when I mean to click reply.....

I have this issue too seems a tad flawed design, especially the fact you can't "unlike" after you've liked a comment.

belto said,
I hope M$ listens to me and make win8 work with legacy and new devices well. The economy the way it is most people cannot afford nor wish to cough up hard earned cash just to boost M$ pockets and such. Let people decide when and if to upgrade their PC's etc... once trying out Win8. This was the main fault with Vista. Win7 is much more able to handle legacy stuff but it still lags behind. I am hoping to get my Beta Invite for Win8.

You do realise don't you that times move on, and if you keep on expecting the latest and greatest thing to run on legacy kit then the world will never progress. I imagine it will have the same requirements as Windows 7, which aren't exactly pushing the boat out.

belto said,
I hope M$ listens to me and make win8 work with legacy and new devices well. The economy the way it is most people cannot afford nor wish to cough up hard earned cash just to boost M$ pockets and such. Let people decide when and if to upgrade their PC's etc... once trying out Win8. This was the main fault with Vista. Win7 is much more able to handle legacy stuff but it still lags behind. I am hoping to get my Beta Invite for Win8.

Did you even put any thought into what you just said? How is buying new hardware going to put money in Microsoft's pocket?

[quote=zeke009 said,] You are so right about HP. They laughed at me--leaving me with some very expensive dust catchers. Guess whose products I will not be buying when my PC, scanner, and printer need replacement.

TsarNikky said,
You are so right about HP. They laughed at me--leaving me with some very expensive dust catchers.

How is it an expensive dust catcher?
1. HP is compensating early buyers -> not expensive
2. You can still use the device -> not a dust catcher

margrave said,
Windows 8 just looks like their attempt at LCARS

Specific UI for specific jobs is what it should be......live long and prosper.

pocaracas said,
The best thing win8 can do is support win7/vista drivers. Will it?

As long as it's running on x86 hardware why wouldn't it support Vista/Win7 drivers?

The problem, not that it actually is one, is if it's running on ARM, not that USB devices wouldn't work regardless.

travelcard said,

Windows Media Center? It lives?

I've got this horrible feeling that WMC could be killed or drastically reduced on Win 8. As much as the fantastic product it is (it drives my main TV ) it doesn't seem to have caught on as much as they would like. I really hope they don't as there's so much more to be done on the PVR side of things (catching up with features available in TiVo and Sky+ for example) but I guess we're going to find out soon.....

Even with short videos we have not found the right way to put context around the overall experience.

who is stopping you from putting long videos