One in Three IT Staff Snoops on Co-Workers

According to Reuters, one in three information technology professionals abuses administrative passwords to access confidential data such as colleagues' personal emails and salary details.

Cyber-Ark surveyed 300 senior IT professionals and found 1/3 admitted to snooping, and 47 percent had admitted to accessing information not relevant to their role.

Cyber-Ark found that administrative passwords are changed far less frequently than standard user passwords, with 30 percent being changed only once every 3 months, and 9 percent never being changed, meaning that any past employees would still have access to the systems.

View: Reuters

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21 Comments

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If the government does this, it's an outrage. It's downright ridiculous. It's uncalled for, shameful, and everybody should burn them MF's down to the ground to stop it.

But, apparently, if you are given the power and opportunity to do the same thing, who cares! It's funny!

I shouldn't have to tell you what that proves.

"If we're the police, who will police the police?"

PS: Bonus points to anyone who knows where that quote is from

Here at work there is a web login for Pallet Track opperations, anyone can access the site and the password is never changed even when people have left. Would just take one disgruntled employeet to caruse chaos...

I too am also guilty. But it has to be done, e-mail and screen monitoring.

I have caught people in the act of browsing porn on government systems, and it becomes a liability issue, and potential sexual harassment lawsuit. So it has to be kept in check.

Needless to say the people I have caught are no longer employed with us.

If your job is to monitor emails then you are not guilty; you are just doing your job.

I am an IT admin myself and I fall under the 2/3 of "good admins" who don't peek unauthorized information.
While I'd be interested to find out how much my co-workers are making, and I probably could find such
information if I wanted to...I know what's right and wrong.

(Troll said @ #3)
Don't you mean according to Reuters... Never heard of the news organization routers...

Routers, yep thats how you know you're a geek and need to get out more :P

meaning that any past employees would still have access to the systems.

Ummm...if this were an effective organization, the user account/rights would be removed at the time of firing/transfer.

(briangw said @ #1)

Ummm...if this were an effective organization, the user account/rights would be removed at the time of firing/transfer. :rolleyes:

You'd like to think that... where I work the tech people are the last people to know someone was fired... heck every place I've been at it's been like that... and when management doesn't tell the admins what happened accounts don't get closed out...

(neufuse said @ #1.1)

You'd like to think that... where I work the tech people are the last people to know someone was fired... heck every place I've been at it's been like that... and when management doesn't tell the admins what happened accounts don't get closed out...

No problems here. We have a term process where our help desk kills the accounts right away.

By admin passwords i believe they are referring to the servers builtin accounts and such, not just everyday user accounts for the general users.