Oracle drops OpenOffice.org

Oracle announced its intentions to discontinue the OpenOffice.org (OOo) suite of software on Friday 15th. The move does not come as a major surprise, following a 'fork' of the OpenOffice developers several months ago. The group who left OpenOffice.org development founded a 'vendor-neutral' group, known as The Document Foundation. The Document Foundation then began to develop an alternative to OpenOffice, known as LibreOffice. Unsurprisingly, the software suite is free, and is based upon the OpenOffice source code. Ars Technica provides coverage of how Oracle intends to progress without the OOo software in its arsenal.

Already, LibreOffice has gathered the support of commercial companies traditionally linked to OpenOffice - for example, Red Hat, Novell, Canonical, and Google have all moved their support towards The Document Foundation. The huge shift in support has left Oracle, quite literally, maintaining the open source software alone. It should come as no real surprise that Oracle have since considered and decided to end support for their software suite. When The Document Foundation was formed, they invited Oracle to give up the rights to the OpenOffice branding.

Oracle refused to hand over the rights to the OpenOffice product, and went a step further still, by attempting to pressure key members of The Document Foundation into resigning from their posts in OpenOffice.org development. The sheer popularity of LibreOffice has already convinced the developers of some Linux distributions to package it in their installations over the traditional OpenOffice software. Such is the popularity of LibreOffice that OpenOffice has ceased to be financially secure, meaning that Oracle no longer intends to continue to produce the software.

Oracle's position in the world of open-source software was shaken by the overnight surge in popularity for LibreOffice. Oracle sold a commercial version of OpenOffice, much like Sun Microsystems chose to do with StarOffice, another open-source office suite. While the significance of Oracle's submission to the power of The Document Foundation is quite surprising, it continues to leave questions hanging over the future of another Oracle project: Cloud Office. While the Cloud Office project used its own source code and was not built from OpenOffice, the future of the project is not guaranteed.

While many open-source office applications exist, OpenOffice.org is generally regarded as the most popular, due to its appearance in many different Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.

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Seems Oracle decided to keep their reputation for crappy software, by dropping the only good one they had.

Siebel anyone? I worked for Telstra for a while and that piece of s**t excuse for software was hell.

I just joined a new organization, and they use OpenOffice. Gawd, it's GHASTLY. I find myself struggling with even the most basic formatting and document layout - let alone any serious complex use.

Nowadays office applications are more suitable to student or personal user, while corporate users should migrate to cloud services. Oracle have the so called APEX, it was designed to replace spreadsheet apps, it is very powerful and easy to develop.

Also don't forget Oracle is the #1 business software company in the world. How could people say they are junk. Madness world.

*sigh* I remember the days when StarOffice had promise before Oracle bought it out. Why can't open source be left alone by the big corporations who later pull the plug?

Medfordite said,
*sigh* I remember the days when StarOffice had promise before Oracle bought it out. Why can't open source be left alone by the big corporations who later pull the plug?


someone sold it to them, blame the ones that owned OOo before being bought out and canceled.

OpenOffice: No problem, son. On the 3rd day, he roses...
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------- into LibreOffice -------------------------------

I just wish we could use OSS that doesn't feel like the bare minimum. OOo is a nice project in theory, but in execution, it's like a gimped Office 97. Seems like most OSS programs are the same: great idea, poor execution.

It's about time OOo gained full independence from Oracle. The writing has been on the wall for sometime; developers and supporters defecting, and Oracle's increasingly tyrannical approach to community input.

LibreOffice has my best wishes for the future. Lets hope we can get even more businesses, governments, and users to switch to a truly open office suite.

You get what you pay for comes to mind. I use LibreOffice as its free and I need only basic spreadsheet functionality. Do I need Microsoft Office for this? No. Would I give up Microsoft Office at work? Hell no.

Wiggy1223 said,
What about Natty? Will OOo still be there? Or will LibreOffice take over?

LibreOffice is the default office suite on Natty. alt + f2, then type: update-manager -d and give it a whirl Assuming you have 10.10 already

Open Office and Libre Office exist to provide an office package to people who cant afford MS Office, no doubt MS Office is the best, same is for Windows, but as Linux exists - to provide poor people with a basic OS (yeah, i know that some 50yr old virgins use Linux and can tell me how its superior to Windows, but i dont care about that)


it has always been like that:

free is free, but its not the best

It's not just about cost, It's about the freedom to use truly open standards, cross platform support, and the rejection of proprietary lock-in. Besides, I for one much prefer the LibreOffice user experience to MS Office with its distracting ribbon toolbar. My friends and family also agree.

Flawed said,
It's not just about cost, It's about the freedom to use truly open standards, cross platform support, and the rejection of proprietary lock-in. Besides, I for one much prefer the LibreOffice user experience to MS Office with its distracting ribbon toolbar. My friends and family also agree.

i like both, but im aware of the pros and cons of each

OpenOffice was utter sh*t anyway. LibreOffice is, though, no different. It starts slowly and it takes quite some time to open a document - a few minutes by loading it or something.

Aside form massive performance issues compared to MS Office, it also doesn't render things with higher complexity than simple text without errors.

And, it is hard to use - all functionality either missing or buried behind an interface now even worthy of Office 2003.

+1 To Oracle

Now that LibreOffice (used to be OpenOffice) is free of Oracle's control, the Document Foundation can now focus on polishing up the application and make it better.

LibreOffice isn't a terrible application that some fanboys make it out to be and I use it myself. It is enough for me. Most people only use like 10% of the functions in an Office Suite.

Once, the Document Foundation make it more modern (better GUI) and start up quickly (better Java engine)... It will be a great application.

wixostrix said,
Why do all these open sources software have such generic sounding names?

As opposed to what? "Microsoft Office"? Sometimes the easiest way to tell people what your software does is to actually name it properly.

OpenOffice = Open Suite
LibreOffice = Office Suite

Flickr, Hulu, Twitter, Bit.ly: what the hell do these names mean? **** all that's what.

Majesticmerc said,

As opposed to what? "Microsoft Office"? Sometimes the easiest way to tell people what your software does is to actually name it properly.

OpenOffice = Open Suite
LibreOffice = Office Suite

Flickr, Hulu, Twitter, Bit.ly: what the hell do these names mean? **** all that's what.

I'm not saying they're bad, I'm just saying they sound cheap, to me. You don't have to bite my head off using aggressive language.

Microsoft is a known brand, therefore it does not sound generic. Flickr, Hulu, etc are names people came up with and turned into know brands. I think I just don't like the word Open. And I think LibreOffice would translate to Free Office.

wixostrix said,
Why do all these open sources software have such generic sounding names?

And Microsoft Office doesn't sound bland/unoriginal?

To all linux fans: this can make you to see that if you want to do your kind "Open Source" , you have to loose! Open Source is not for competition !

OO and desktop linux are deadends projects, Accept that!

Emperatoor said,
To all linux fans: this can make you to see that if you want to do your kind "Open Source" , you have to loose! Open Source is not for competition !

OO and desktop linux are deadends projects, Accept that!

How embarrassing.

Emperatoor said,
To all linux fans: this can make you to see that if you want to do your kind "Open Source" , you have to loose! Open Source is not for competition !

OO and desktop linux are deadends projects, Accept that!

No they aren't Windows someday as an operating system will collapse. Then in time Linux shall prevail. Linux is used in the french polices computers. Its used in the Indian government uses it. Russian government and their schools are moving to it and many more people around the world use it. Just look http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_adoption#Government

Emperatoor said,
To all linux fans: this can make you to see that if you want to do your kind "Open Source" , you have to loose! Open Source is not for competition !
OO and desktop linux are deadends projects, Accept that!

Wait, so why are governments all around the world replacing their current Microsoft software with FOSS, including OOo and Linux?

Flawed said,

Wait, so why are governments all around the world replacing their current Microsoft software with FOSS, including OOo and Linux?

Two words - price and control. FOSS (and especially outside North America) is almost entirely about maintaining control (especially since most commercial software is in North American-based, if not United States-based, control; fairly or not, the United States has a bad reputation). Price and philosphy are powerful motivators.

Flawed said,

Wait, so why are governments all around the world replacing their current Microsoft software with FOSS, including OOo and Linux?

LOL! In Germany and Austria they are actually changing back to Windows…

zikalify said,
No they aren't Windows someday as an operating system will collapse. Then in time Linux shall prevail. Linux is used in the french polices computers. Its used in the Indian government uses it. Russian government and their schools are moving to it and many more people around the world use it. Just look http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_adoption#Government

nopes, south Indian government tried to replace windows, but they are using windows again, linux wasnt doing there work. rest of Indian office use Windows.

Flawed said,

Really?
http://wiki.services.openoffic...Office.org_Deployments#Asia

I think you need to get your facts straight. The Indian government is actively promoting the use of FOSS and OOo/LibreOffice.

like i said before, it is only used in South India, now you cleared it is only used in Tamil Nadu ( a state in south, not whole south India ). not the WHOLE INDIA.


Read the article before posting, go troll somewhere else.

I thought I was the only one, but good news OpenOffice is no more. To bad LibreOffice is in the making. People need to learn that you need proper software for your business. And Microsoft has that solution with office 2010 and Office Web Apps thats also free.

Peter van Dam said,
I thought I was the only one, but good news OpenOffice is no more. To bad LibreOffice is in the making. People need to learn that you need proper software for your business. And Microsoft has that solution with office 2010 and Office Web Apps thats also free.

Now go claim your paycheck from MS for your brilliant advertising.

recursive said,

Now go claim your paycheck from MS for your brilliant advertising.

Lol. Nah, I would have done the same for Apple, but I don't want to pay twice for the same product so unable to give it a try. But if I can claim a paycheck from MS, I would have been millionair already

Has Oracle actually said it's giving up OpenOffice.org? The Ars Technica report (as well as reports on other sites like The Register) say that they're giving up the COMMERCIAL version (Oracle OpenOffice - the commercial version of OpenOffice.org). They haven't said specifically that they're going to stop development of OpenOffice.org.

OpenOffice (or LibreOffice from now on) is still a disappointment in many areas of productivity features. Given the huge support the project has from the open source community it sill lacks many features and applications to contend with Microsoft Office or to even think about it as a replacement.

It's slow, unstable, and lite on features.. Too bad most OpenSource fans seem to ignore that when they tell people to not bother with MS Office..

ajua said,
OpenOffice ...... still lacks many features and applications to contend with Microsoft Office or to even think about it as a replacement.

OpenOffice => FREE.

MS Office => Lots of money.

The point is, if you don't need all the extra features, OpenOffice (or LibreOffice) is a free option. But if you need the extra features, pay out the cash.

ajua said,
Given the huge support the project has from the open source community it sill lacks many features and applications to contend with Microsoft Office or to even think about it as a replacement.

Are you talking critical features, or something that the majority of people have never even used? I have yet to find one in MS Office that I can't do without. And by the way, the ribbon isn't a feature.

Ryoken said,
It's slow, unstable, and lite on features..

MS Office seems bloated, slow, has a distracting UI, and is very costly. LibreOffice suffers from none of those problems.

Ryoken said,

Too bad most OpenSource fans seem to ignore that when they tell people to not bother with MS Office..

You can sleep comfortably in the knowledge that LibreOffice has taken a significant amount of marketshare/mindshare away from MS Office, and will continue to do so with ease in the future. MS Office is starting to look like IE from that perspective, that is, it started off at 95%+, and has been slowing and consistently declining year upon year.

Captain555 said,

OpenOffice => FREE.

MS Office => Lots of money.

The point is, if you don't need all the extra features, OpenOffice (or LibreOffice) is a free option. But if you need the extra features, pay out the cash.

Office 2010 Home and Student: $99
Office 2010 Home and Small Business: $199

I'm sorry, but if you are a professional and generate revenue from the word documents and excel spreadsheets you use, $199 is seriously chump change. OOo sucks. I'd argue the productivity increase from using Office 2010 over OOo would make up the difference in cost for any professional within a relative short time. If your company is trying to shave costs by going with inferior software that hurts productivity, I would be questioning if your company will be in business much longer.

Shadrack said,

Office 2010 Home and Student: $99
Office 2010 Home and Small Business: $199

I'm sorry, but if you are a professional and generate revenue from the word documents and excel spreadsheets you use, $199 is seriously chump change. OOo sucks. I'd argue the productivity increase from using Office 2010 over OOo would make up the difference in cost for any professional within a relative short time. If your company is trying to shave costs by going with inferior software that hurts productivity, I would be questioning if your company will be in business much longer.

That's true, if it's worth it, then MS Office is the way forward (although to be fair, most documents I've ever seen that were written in MS Word still look like ass. You can't fix stupid). Captain555's post still applies though, the VAST majority of people don't need the extra features that MS Office provides, which makes OOo a good solution. I will guide most people to OOo first, and if they ask for stuff that OOo can't do, then I will tell them to pay up for MS Office. Most people I have recommended OOo to have never asked for MS Office.

Shadrack said,

Office 2010 Home and Student: $99
Office 2010 Home and Small Business: $199

I'm sorry, but if you are a professional and generate revenue from the word documents and excel spreadsheets you use, $199 is seriously chump change. OOo sucks. I'd argue the productivity increase from using Office 2010 over OOo would make up the difference in cost for any professional within a relative short time. If your company is trying to shave costs by going with inferior software that hurts productivity, I would be questioning if your company will be in business much longer.

I would buy it if only it would run on my Ubuntu machine

Majesticmerc said,

That's true, if it's worth it, then MS Office is the way forward (although to be fair, most documents I've ever seen that were written in MS Word still look like ass. You can't fix stupid). Captain555's post still applies though, the VAST majority of people don't need the extra features that MS Office provides, which makes OOo a good solution. I will guide most people to OOo first, and if they ask for stuff that OOo can't do, then I will tell them to pay up for MS Office. Most people I have recommended OOo to have never asked for MS Office.

and the vast majority of people using OOo could make do with MS's wordpad just save your docs as RTF

Shadrack said,
I'm sorry, but if you are a professional and generate revenue from the word documents and excel spreadsheets you use, $199 is seriously chump change.

Wasn't that my point ?

But I disagree on the "chump change". I'm a computer builder and I can build right now a complete PC for $185. $199 is a lot of money for a small enterprise.

Captain555 said,

But I disagree on the "chump change". I'm a computer builder and I can build right now a complete PC for $185. $199 is a lot of money for a small enterprise.

+1
And that $199 is only for a one seat licence. With ten computers, you are talking $1990, and that's without accounting for upgrades, which are inevitable. Sure, you might get a discount on ten licences, but it's still a hell of a lot more than OOo/Libre Office, especially for small businesses.

Flawed said,

+1
And that $199 is only for a one seat licence. With ten computers, you are talking $1990, and that's without accounting for upgrades, which are inevitable. Sure, you might get a discount on ten licences, but it's still a hell of a lot more than OOo/Libre Office, especially for small businesses.

you can buy licenses for multiple systems and/or cooperate environments, which ends up to far lower costs per system.
and IIRC, MS Office can be used on 3 systems for a single license.

yowan said,
Who would still that obsolete era software

Was there some English in that sentence somewhere? If so, I think I missed it. LOL!

OO was junk anyways, especially back in the day when they touted themselves as "the" replacement for office, yet they couldn't even render office documents near readable in some instances....

the forks are better though..

neufuse said,
OO was junk anyways, especially back in the day when they touted themselves as "the" replacement for office, yet they couldn't even render office documents near readable in some instances....

I know what you mean. I tried Microsoft Office the other day and it failed to render my ODF document. Such junk man. I'm glad I could just download LibreOffice and view it with 100% fidelity.

Flawed said,

I know what you mean. I tried Microsoft Office the other day and it failed to render my ODF document. Such junk man. I'm glad I could just download LibreOffice and view it with 100% fidelity.

I get the point of what you are saying, and I agree with it, but you do know that MS Office does support ODF, right?

neufuse said,
OO was junk anyways, especially back in the day when they touted themselves as "the" replacement for office, yet they couldn't even render office documents near readable in some instances....

the forks are better though..

Agreed

neufuse said,
OO was junk anyways, especially back in the day when they touted themselves as "the" replacement for office, yet they couldn't even render office documents near readable in some instances....

the forks are better though..

I tried it and switched back to MS Office straight away, I am wondering about whether the people who think that OpenOffice is good actually use the Office software regularly and for anything more than basic word documents.

I might try out LibreOffice at some point though, looks interesting.

neufuse said,
especially back in the day when they touted themselves as "the" replacement for office, yet they couldn't even render office documents near readable in some instances...

_Replacement for office_, as in, you can do the same tasks/workflow as you could do with Microsoft Office. It doesn't mean that you can actually use Microsoft Office files and expect great results. Keep in mind that the binary specifications of these files was just released a couple of years ago.
Do you expect that a Beta tape would work on a VHS player/recorder, since they both work with video/audio? C'mon son!

Minimoose said,

I am wondering about whether the people who think that OpenOffice is good actually use the Office software regularly and for anything more than basic word documents.

Just the millions of GNU/Linux users and businesses around the world. And that's not even counting MAC and Windows. I personally use it on a daily basis for actual work, not some basic documents; I've got gedit for basic word editing, or vim/emacs/nano if I'm on the cli. But good try attempting to trivialise a major competitor to MS Office.

Minimoose said,

I might try out LibreOffice at some point though, looks interesting.

Your statements are contradictory. How can you know the capabilities of it if you've never tried it?

thealexweb said,
Grr Oracle better hand over the OpenOffice name to the LibreOffice people because they have no further use for it.
Why? LibreOffice is its own thing now.

zikalify said,
Why? LibreOffice is its own thing now.

Why try and promote something people have never heard of when you can use the name of a well known product.

thealexweb said,
Grr Oracle better hand over the OpenOffice name to the LibreOffice people because they have no further use for it.

I like LibreOffice better. There are so many companies abusing the word "open" these days cough* Microsoft *cough, that it's lost its true meaning.

roadwarrior said,
Oracle is a cancer on the industry, just like SCO.

Very true, wants to be the most expensive and used by the biggest names but actually has the worst software.

roadwarrior said,
Oracle is a cancer on the industry, just like SCO.

Don't get me started on SCO... I hate it and their stupid licensing. Believe it or not we still run it on some servers at work... I'll drink to the day we retire that garbage of a an OS....

roadwarrior said,
Oracle is a cancer on the industry, just like SCO.

Hardly.. Sun was going out of business on their own and Oracle is simply just following in the footsteps of MS acquiring technologues and re-branding under their umbrella. Oracle 11gR2 RDBMS, Oracle EBS 12.1.3, Oracle Weblogic, Oracle Glassfish, Oracle Solaris 11 Express are actually really nice products that make corporations billions of dollars in streamlined costs savings.

dvb2000 said,
Why exactly did they buy Sun again? Is there anything left of the old Sun company?

Sun was cheap and Oracle got some technology out of it. Who knows what long term vision is left for sparc, but they're certainly selling it and integrating it across the platform now. Exedata v2 is actually a decent platform after they learned some stuff from their sun acquisition and didn't rely on HP/3rd party vendors.

dvb2000 said,
Why exactly did they buy Sun again? Is there anything left of the old Sun company?

Simple. Oracle bought Sun for Java technologies, and for the extensive patent portfolio that Sun had. And the price was too good to pass up for all that juicy IP. In fact, I am most scared by Oracle having the Sun patents, as Sun used to play a game of trying to see how broad and silly a patent application they could get past the USPTO, and they apparently got quite a few patents granted that should never have been granted. Sun kept them for defensive reasons, but who knows what Oracle will do with them.

roadwarrior said,
Oracle is a cancer on the industry, just like SCO.

Whats happening with OpenOffice.org, is happening with MySQL aswell. MySQL will be dropped/discontinued very soon too (or already has, didnt keep up with it.)

OpenOffice.org was the best alternative to MS Office, and MySQL was the best alternative to pretty much any other SQL solution... both becomming discontinued is quite a hard hit to teh internetz.

The Skeptic Canuck said,

Simple. Oracle bought Sun for Java technologies, and for the extensive patent portfolio that Sun had. And the price was too good to pass up for all that juicy IP. In fact, I am most scared by Oracle having the Sun patents, as Sun used to play a game of trying to see how broad and silly a patent application they could get past the USPTO, and they apparently got quite a few patents granted that should never have been granted. Sun kept them for defensive reasons, but who knows what Oracle will do with them.


Sun was a GREAT company IMO. They supported so many products, often for free. Helped out tons of companies and communities with their products.... I was kinda shocked when a while ago when redownloading Java runtime software, Sun was bought by Oracle...
I think Virtualbox will die the same horrible death OpenOffice and MySQL will

roadwarrior said,
Oracle is a cancer on the industry, just like SCO.

just didn't know Open Office was that dead. when I found this I downloaded Libre immediately and removed Open Office